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other words, In slack times the full force of all of these governmental activities should be utilized for the purpose of taking up the slack resulting from depression In commercial and industrial operations. No bigger task confronts the statesmen than to solve the problem of meeting unemployment, which saddens the faces of millions of men, writes the lines of care on the woman's brow, and puts the haunting look of "why?" In the eyes of children just beginning to understand their parents' woe at the thought that on to-morrow the bread chest will be empty.

The Clerk read as follows:

For additional amount for the erection of a four-room extensible building iu Potomac Heights, fiscal year 1928, $24,000.

Mr. WOOD. Mr. Chairman, I offer an amendment.

The CHAIHMAN. The gentleman from Indiana offers an amendment, which the Clerk will report.

The Clerk read as follows:

Amendment offered by Mr. Wood: On page 10, In line 11, after the word "Heights," strike out "fiscal year 1928."

The amendment was agreed to.

The Clerk read as follows:

The sum of $11,000 of the appropriation of $37,250 for the purchase of school-building and playground sites, contained In the District of Columbia appropriation act for the fiscal year 1928, Is made available for the acquisition of land in the vicinity of the Peabody School In accordance with the final award in condemnation proceedings, without limitation as to price based on assessed value.

Mr. SIMMONS. Mr. Chairman, I offer an amendment

The CHAIRMAN. The gentleman from Nebraska offers an amendment, which the Clerk will report.

The Clerk read as follows:

Amendment offered by Mr. Simmons: On page 11, after line 17, Insert as a new paragraph the following:

"The Commissioners of the District of Columbia are authorized to employ a consulting landscape architect under the appropriation of $250,000 for treatment of grounds of the Langley Junior High School and the McKinley High School, contained In the District of Columbia appropriation act for the fiscal year 1929, at a cost not to exceed $1,500, which amount shall be included as a part of the 3 per cent of said appropriation allowed the municipal architect's office for personal services."

Mr. CRAMTON. Mr. Chairman, will the gentleman from Nebraska state why the office of Colonel Grant could not furnish all of that labor?

Mr. SIMMONS. We are expending on those high-school sites between two and three million dollars. The municipal architect asked for this authorization, and I believe it is one that is justified.

Mr. CRAMTON. I yield to the gentleman's judgment

The amendment was agreed to.

The Clerk read as follows:

PUBLIC BUILDINGS AND PUBLIC PARKS

Park police: For an additional amount far pay and allowances of the United States park police, in accordance with the act approved May 27, 1924, as amended, fiscal year 1029, $6,700.

Mr. NEWTON. Mr. Chairman, I offer an amendment. The CHAIRMAN. The gentleman from Minnesota offers an , amendment, which the Clerk will report. I The Clerk read as follows:

Amendment offered by Mr. Newton: On page 17, line B, after the figures "$8,700" Insert a new paragraph to rend as follows:

"National Zoological Park: For construction and equipment of necessary exhibition cages and walks around the exterior of pnbllc exhibition building for birds, fiscal years 1928 and 1929, $30,000."

Mr. NEWTON. Mr. Chairman, this Item is for the purpose of finally completing the bird house at the Zoo. I understand it is acceptable to the chairman of the committee.

The amendment was agreed to.

The Clerk read as follows:

BUREAU Of FISHERIES

Fish distribution car: For the purchase or construction of a steel car for the distribution of useful food fishes, Including the necessary equipment, $60,000, to remain available until June 30, 1929.

Mr. LANIIAM. Mr. Chairman, I offer an amendment

The CHAIRMAN. The gentleman from Texas offers an amendment, which the Clerk will report.

The Clerk read as follows:

Amendment offered by Mr. Laniiaii : On page 24, line 5, after the figures " 1929," Insert a new paragraph, as follows:

"That portion of the appropriation, miscellaneous expenses, Bureau of Fisheries, 1927, which was made available for a fish-cultural station at Lake Worth, Tex., shall continue available for such purpose during the fiscal year 1929."

The amendment was agreed to.

Mr. IiAGUARUIA. Mr. Chairman, I ask unanimous consent to return to page 4, for the purpose of offering an amendment

The CHAIRMAN. The gentleman from New York asks unanimous consent to return to page 4, for the purpose of offering an amendment,

Mr. CRAMTON. Mr. Chairman, the urgency for getting this bill through is such that I am obliged to object.

The Clerk read as follows:

Michaud division, Fort Hall Indian Reservation, Idaho: To carry out the provisions of an act entitled "An act authorizing an appropriation for the survey and Investigation of the placing of water on the Michaud division and other lands in the Fort Hall Indian Reservation." approved March 28, 3928, fiscal years 1928 and 1929, $25,000 (reimbursable).

Mr. MORROW. Mr. Chairman, I offer an amendment.

The CHAIRMAN. The gentleman from New Mexico offers an amendment, which the Clerk will report.

The Clerk read as follows:

Amendment offered by Mr. Morrow: On page 30, line 4, Insert a new paragraph:

"Middle Rio Grande conservancy project. New Mexico: For payments to the Middle Rio Grande conservancy district, in accordance with the provisions of an act entitled 'An act authorizing the Secretary of the Interior to execute an agreement with the Middle Rio Grande conservancy district providing for conservation. Irrigation, drainage, and flood control for the Pueblo Indian lands In the Rio Grande Valley, N. Mex., and for other purposes,' approved March 13, 1928, fiscal year 1929, $100,000 (reimbursable)."

Mr. CRAMTON. Mr. Chairman, will the gentleman yield?

Mr. MORROW. I yield.

Mr. CRAMTON. The contract between the Government and the conservancy district authorized by the act referred to has not yet been signed and therefore our committee could not give consideration to that contract and the extent to which it conformed with the act.

It is the understanding of the gentleman and his expectation that if this appropriation is given now, and I know there is some urgency requiring it, that when the next appropriation comes along next December, the committee will not be estopped, but it will be expected that the committee will make a study of the situation and of the contract that will then have been entered into.

Mr. MORROW. Mr. Chairman and members of the committee, I will say my understanding was that everything concerning that contract had been practically complied with before the gentleman who represented the district left for New Mexico, but something arose afterwards concerning the same and I had a conversation with the Assistant Commissioner of Indian Affairs to-day in which he says it is perfectly satisfactory. This amount was approved by the Budget went to the President, and I was assured up until this morning, when I got the bill, that it was in the bill, and I was surprised when the bill came out without this item being Included.

Mr. CRAMTON. With the understanding I have suggested I would have no objection to the gentleman's item, and I am sure the committee would not.

Mr. MORROW. It will be carried out without any question.

The amendment was agreed to.

The Clerk read as follows:

Crop damage. Isletn Pueblo, N. Mex.: Indian pueblos, New Mexico: For payment of damages to crops and improvements destroyed In constructing tlie Isleta drainage canal, fiscal years 1928 and 1929, $161.

Mr. LAGUARDIA. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike out the lust word. Mr. Chairman and gentlemen of the committee, I do not want to make a nuisance of myself. Sometimes I do, although I do not intend it

I want to make an appeal to the gentleman from Michigan [Mr. Cbamton], if he will give me his attention. A few moments ago by action of the committee we increased certain salaries of employees of the House, and properly so. I understand the bill also provides a timely and proper increase for the pay of the reporters. A few years ago we Increased our own salaries. This leaves the salaries of the executive officers of the House of Representatives entirely out of proportion to the salaries of the employees and the salaries of the Members.

I have prepared a little amendment. I do not believe it will meet with the objection of the distinguished chairman of the Committee on Appropirations. I do not believe there is any opposition to it from the ranking minority member, the gentleman from Tennessee. I am sure it meets with the approval both of the majority floor leader and if I may say so, the Speaker of the House, with whom I have just talked. This being so, it is a rather simple matter. It does not involve any legislation that will require a great deal of study.

May I appeal to the gentleman from Michigan to withdraw Uk objection and permit me to ask unanimous censent to go back to page 4 and insert this item?

Mr. CHAMTON. Mr. Chairman, of course the gentleman has the right to appeal, but let me say this to the gentleman: There are certain items that were gone into carefully by the subcommittee on the legislative bill.

They have been carefully investigated. An appeal was made on the floor for certain other employees when the legislative bill was up. At that time I made a point of order for the reason that there had been no preliminary investigation by any committee. I suggested that every employee around the Capitol had some Member to speak for him, and if you once started there would be no place to stop. So I made the point of order. There has been a further investigation made as to employees. I did not think it wise to put them in to-day but, because there has been an opportunity for investigation and study, and feeling that they ought to be put in, I did not make objection.

Now, the gentleman from New York suggests that some other employees whose cases no committee has given any study or consideration to, and right now on each side of me have been forming lines of Members of the House awaiting an opportunity to make an appeal for their employees if the gentleman from New York is successful; because I think there is no other place to stop it except right here I am going to object. If the gentleman would offer the amendment I should make the point of order, so there is no object in going back.

Mr. LAGUARDIA. I realize my helplessness unless I have the gentleman's good will.

Mr. CRAMTON. The gentleman from New York has my good will.

The CHAIRMAN. The time of the gentleman from New York has expired, and the pro forma amt'iidment is withdrawn.

The Clerk read as follows:

Salaries, ('•••-. and expenses of marshals, United States courts: For salaries, fees, and expenses of United States marshals and their deputies, including the game objects specified under this head In the act making appropriations 1'or the Department of Justice for the fiscal year 1924, $1,861.35.

Mr. BLACK of New York. Mr. Chairman, I offer the following amendment.

The Clerk read as follows:

Amendment by Mr. Buck of New York: Page 40, line 2, after the figures "$1,861.35," Insert the following: "Provided, That such marshals and deputy marshals shnll not be employed to serve or enforce injunction orders against the officers of a municipality or a State in matters affecting the rates of public utilities."

Mr. WOOD. To that Mr. Chairman, I make the point of order.

Mr. BLACK of New York. Will the gentleman reserve it?

Mr. WOOD. No; I make it.

Mr. BLACK of New York. I want to be heard, Mr. Chairman, on the point of order. I am offering this amendment for the sole purpose of keeping the marshals and their deputies within the proper sphere of their duty. It is my contention that the Federal Government should not through the executive branch, to wit, the marshals under the Department of Justice, interfere with the State officials trying to maintain the laws of the States. If I may be permitted to give a concrete example

The CHAIRMAN. The Chair desires that the gentleman confine himself to the point of order.

Mr. BLACK of New York. I want to limit the marshals of the United States courts where the court has taken jurisdiction without warrant under the Constitution. There is one case that comes to my mind where the court took jurisdiction on an ex parte application in the middle of the night. I do not want such action in the executive branch of the Government stepping into a State or a city with the strength of the United States back of them and interfering with local laws and regulations.

Mr. LAGUARDIA. Mr. Chairman, the gentleman's amendment is a limitation.

The CHAIRMAN. The Chair considers the amendment as a direct instruction in the form of legislation and sustains the point of order.

Mr. BLACK of New York. Mr. Chairman, I ask unanimous consent to proceed for five minutes.

Mr. WOOD. The gentleman spoke five minutes on the point of order without saying anything about the point of order.

Mr. BLACK of New York. I do not think the Chairman of the committee wants to keep me from speaking on the merits of the amendment for five minutes.

Mr. WOOD. I do not want to object but I do want to get along, because we want to finish this bill to-night.

Mr. BLACK of New York. I will not take but three minutes.

The CHAIRMAN. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman from New York?

There was no objection.

Mr. BLACK of New York. I want to call attention to the situation that confronts this Government in the city of New York.

For years in New York they have been charging on the subways a 5-cent fare under a contract between the people of the city of New York and the transit companies. We have courts in New York to which the transit companies could go, were there any proper question concerning the contracts. The transit companies of New York have gone into the Federal jurisdiction and on motion a statutory court was created, and the opinion was handed down by that court against the 5-cent fare, and to read the opinion you would think that it was written by the transit companies' lawyers.

Mr. Laguardia. it was.

Mr. BLACK of New York. I am vouchsafed some information by the gentleman from New York that I did not have. The people of the city of New York are concerned about this situation. They resent the Federal court interfering with this matter. We have had bills here to give us more judges in the Federal courts in New York upon the theory that they had too much work to do now. They have enough work within their own proper jurisdiction. The State courts of New York were there for the transit companies to appeal to. They should not summarily have gone into the Federal courts to try out this proposition. There is a general resentment throughout the country against the Federal courts becoming rate-making bodies. We have in each State utility commissions to puss upon the question of rates, because these commissions can give the time required for a proper study of this question. This statutory court in New York, on papers filed by both sides, without going into the evidence, came to the conclusion that the 5-cent fare contract proposition is conflscatory. I have not the time to go into the entire question now.

The CHAIRMAN. The time of the gentleman from New York has expired.

Mr. LAGUARDIA. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike out "$1,861.31" and insert in lieu thereof "$61.35."

The CHAIRMAN. The gentleman from New York offers an amendment which the Clerk will report.

The Clerk read as follows:

Amendment offered by Mr. Laguakdia: Page 40, line 2, strike out "$1,861.31 " and Insert "$61.35." *

Mr. LAGUARDIA. Mr. Chairman, it may appear unseemly that the gentleman from New York [Mr. Black] and myself should take this time when the committee is anxious to adjourn, but this encroachment of the Federal court in New York City on the powers of the State courts and interferences in the rights of the city is so vital to 6,000,000 people in New York, so vital to the confidence that the American people should have in the Federal courts, that this House can not spend too much time on the question. It will be squarely before you sooner or later. There is not a lawyer in this House but will agree that the Federal Government either by legislation or through its courts can not interfere in the rights of contract. It is guaranteed in the Constitution that no law shall impair such rights. We are operating in New York City with the Interborough Co. on a contract that is 15 years old. This company applied to the Legislature of the State of New York to amend the law, so as to permit them to change their contract. During my time at the city hall they made nn application to the board of estimates for the modification of that contract.

They have appealed to the State courts time and time again, and yet after going to the State legislature seeking a modification of the contract, after themselves insisting when they were making huge profits that it was a valid contract, after going to the city government seeking a modification of the contract, after appealing to the State courts time and time again to get away from that contract, they went to the Federal court and found three judges that were willing to do the dirty work for the grafting exploiters of the Interborough. Wp can not help becoming indignant about this. As my colleague from New York [Mr. Black] stated, Oils was granted on paper, and when I say that the lawyers of the transit company wrote the opinion, the gentleman from New York knows and others may be convinced by simply taking the brief of the transit lawyers and comimring it with the opinion of the court. It is easy to find where the court got its law. The situation in New York City is serious. It is very serious. It is not necessary to lie a constitutional lawyer to know that the Federal courts, these so-culled statutory courts, have gone beyond their powers. Every strap hanger in New York knows it. I tell you it is going to make a very bad impression upon the people of the country when 6,000,000 people refuse to obey the order of the court, because the people of New York will never pay the extra 2 cents on this outrageous decision, improperly obtained. [Applause.]

The CHAIRMAN. The question is on agreeing to the amendment of the gentleman from New York,

The amendment was rejected.

The Clerk read as follows:

Damage claim*: To pay claims for damages adjusted and determined by the Secretary of tlie Navy under the provisions of the act entitled "An act to amend the net authorizing the Secretary of the Navy to settle claims for damages to private property arising from collisions with naval vess'-ls," approved December 28, 1922, as fully set forth In House Documents Nos. 271 and 296, Seventieth Congress, 125,741.22.

Mr. EDWARDS. Mr. Chairman, I ask unanimous consent that the remainder of the bill be considered as read. We have it before us, and it will take a good deal of time to read it. I suggest that the amendments be offered and then pass the bill. Let the bill be considered as having been read, and print it in the Record.

The CHAIRMAN. The gentleman from Idaho wishes to offer amendment a little later on.

Mr. EDWARDS. Very well. I will withhold my request.

The Clerk read as follows:

Ammunition storage facilities, Navy: Toward providing ammunition storage facilities in accordance with the recommendations contained In House Document No. 190. Seventieth Congress, fiscal years 1928 and 1929, $1,193,998. of which sum $038,998 shall be available for the acquisition of land, and $80,000 shall be available for the employment of clnfislfied personal services in the Bureau of Yards and Docks and In the field to be engaged upon such work and to be In addition to employees otherwise provided for.

Mr. FRENCH. Mr. Chairman, I offer an amendment, which I send to the Clerk's desk.

The CHAIRMAN. The Clerk will report the amendment. The Clerk read as follows:

Amendment offered by Mr. French: Page 47, after line 2, In lieu of the matter appearing in lines 3 to 12 both Inclusive, Insert the following:

'•Ammunition storage facilities, Navy: Toward providing ammunition storage facilities In accordance with the recommendations contained in House Document No. 199, Seventieth Congress (and the Secretary of the Navy is authorized to enter into contract or contracts for such facilities at a cost In the aggregate not to exceed $9,179,500, which amount will Include the establishment and development of a naval ammunition depot In the vicinity of Hawthorne, Nev., at a total cost not to exceed $3,500,000, the establishment and development of a naval ammunition depot in the Territory of Hawaii, at a total cost not to exceed $3,540,000, and the replacement of storage facilities at the Navnl Station, Cavite, P. I., subject to and In conformity with the treaty limiting naval armament, ratified August 17, 1923), $1,193,998, of which sum $038,998 shall be available for the acquisition of land, and $80,000 shall be available for the employment of classified personal services in the Bureau of Yards and Docks and in tbe Held to be engaged upon such work and to be in addition to employees otherwise provided for."

The CHAIRMAN. The question is on agreeing to the amendment offered by the gentleman from Idaho.

The amendment was agreed to.

The CHAIRMAN. The Clerk will read.

Mr. EDWARDS. Mr. Chairman, I renew my request.

The CHAIRMAN. The gentleman from Georgia asks unanimous consent to consider the bill as having been read atid to print it in the Record.

Mr. WOOD. If the gentleman will just withhold a moment, we wish to offer another amendment.

Mr. EDWARDS. Mr. Chairman, I withhold my request.

The CHAIRMAN. The Clerk will read.

The Clerk read as follows:

St. Louis, Mo., courthouse, customhouse, etc.: Toward the acquisition of a Kite and construction of a building in lieu of carrying oat the authorization In the act of July 3, 1926, $600,000, In addition to tbe unexpended balance of any money heretofore appropriated for that purpose, which is hereby made available, nnder an estimated total cost of $3,825,000; and the Secretary of the Treasury Is authorized to enter Into a contract or contracts for the entire foregoing estimated cost of such project: Provided, That any cost In excess of $1,000,000 shall be charged against the $100,000,000 authorized In section 5 of the public buildings act approved May 25, 1926, as amended.

Mr. COCHRAN of Missouri. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike out the last word.

The CHAIRMAN. The gentleman from Missouri moves to strike out the last word.

Mr. COCHRAN of Missouri. Mr. Chairman and Members of the House, the bill carries an item of $3,825,000 for a new Federal building in St. Louis. Construct this building and over $5,000,000 will be received by the Government when the present customshouse, erected in 1884, the appraiser's stores building, erected in 1859, and a vacant lot belonging to the Government are sold.

Then, again, when this new building Is constructed the Government will save annually over $62,000 it is now paying in rents to house Government agencies in St. Louis. The exact figure for the present fiscal year is $62,762. This explanation alone should satisfy the House the proposal carried here for the St. Louis building is a good business proposition.

The people of St. Louis found it hard to understand why the Government will not put back in a public building in our city the amount it will receive when the present holdings are disposed of. This has been explained by the Assistant Secretary of the Treasury, Mr. Carl T. Schuueman, to the satisfaction of the civic organizations of St. Louis and if the Department keeps its promises, which I am sure it will do.

St. Louis, my friends, is now engaged in beautifying the city. A bond issue was passed several years ago which provides for an expenditure of $87,000,000. A large amount of this money is being spent in constructing public buildings and creating a plaza in front of our union station. I predict in three years St. Louis will look like a new city to the visitor. Therefore you will fully understand why we want the Government to erect a building of a type which will coincide with the municipal program.

Mr. Schunernan has promised us a monumental type of building six or seven stories high, so constructed as to enable the Government, if necessity demands, to erect additional stories. Pie has promised us a building which will be a credit to the Government and one of which St. Louis will be proud.

This proposition means a great deal to St. Louis. It so happens the Government owns the most valuable block of ground in St. Louis, the block now occupied by the present Federal building, Eighth, Ninth, Olive to Locust Streets. Upon this site was erected in 1884 one of the most substantial public buildings constructed by the Government up to that time. It cost over $5,000,000. It is built of granite, 4 feet thick, and there are two basements. The granite, I am told, is used from the lower basement up. At that time it was used as the main post office, as well as for the courts and other Government agencies. When that building is sold the purchaser will be required to constnict a building which will equal in size any structure in our city in order to secure a fair return on his investment. It is expected the Government will realize from fonr and one-half to five and one-half million dollars when the sale is arranged. The trains that cross the famous Eads Bridge, which spans the Mississippi River at the foot of Washington Avenue, enter a tunnel which passes directly alongside of the eastern boundary of this site.

Many suggestions have l>een offered as to what use it will be put, some contending it will make an ideal location for a downtown railroad station, which we do not now have. A suggestion has been advanced to arrange construction so that suburban trains will be brought to this point, thus discharging passengers in the heart of the business district, and not 15 blocks distant, as is now the case. We hope that when we see the plans for this new building they will prove satisfactory to all, but in tho event we do not receive a building of the type to which we feel we are entitled I say now we will be back asking that this appropriation be increased.

Below will be found a table prepared by the Supervising Architect:

[merged small][table]

1 Does not include storage, about 23,210 square feet, which will be provided when main post office is extended, nor lobby (9,626square feet).

1 Does not include 21,200 square feet storage-warehouse space to be placed in basement.

1 Does not include l.iiiiO square feet storage to be placed in basement.

'Does not include 1.025 square feet storage to be placed in basement.

'Does not include 250 square feet storage in basement.

• Does not include S0.i square feet storage in basement.

: Does not include 4.0CO square feet storage in basement.

> Docs not include 1,500 square feet storage in basement.

I withdraw the pro forma amendment. I ask unanimous consent to extend my remarks in the Uecobo.

The CHAIRMAN. Is there objection?

There wiis no objection.

The CHAIRMAN. The pro forma amendment is withdrawn. The Clerk will read.

The Clerk read as follows:

Okrnulgec, Okla., post office, courthouse, etc.: For acquisition of site and commencement of construction, $75,000, under an estimated total

cost of $a;;o,ooo.

Mr. HASTINGS. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike out the last •word.

The CHAIRMAN. The gentleman from Oklahoma moves to strike out the last word. The gentleman from Oklahoma is recognized.

Mr. HASTINGS. Mr. Chairman, I am glad to know that the claims of Okmulgee for a public building to house her Federal activities are at last to be realized. Okmulgee is one of the splendid, populous, growing, progressive cities of the new State of Oklahoma. It has a population of more than 30,000 and

I am sure that before this building is completed its population will exceed 50,000.

It is the center of a large oil area and in every direction oil derricks delight the eye. Perhaps there are fewer dry wells found In that vicinity than In any other area.

In the southern part of the county there are great quantities of coal. The oil, gas, and coal has invited factories to that section and in the near future it is expected that Okmulgee will be one of the great industrial centers as it is now one of the commercial centers in eastern Oklahoma.

In addition, Okmulgee is surrounded and supported by the very best agricultural land that is to be found in the Middle West

The authorization of this building is the realization of an effort that I have been making since I first came to Congress. We have always been able to present such a showing that the committee has at each session made a favorable report, but we have not passed an omnibus public building bill since 1913, and I was first elected in 1914.

Okmulgee was made a Federal court place through an amendment which I offered to the bill in February, 1925. This justified a larger building. The population has increased rapidly and the postal receipts are in excess of $100,000. It is the fourth city iu population in Oklahoma.

In addition to housing the post office and Federal court the building will care for a larger number of agricultural employees, Indian Service, and numerous other governmental activities. For several years past public-spirited citizens have been contributing from their own means to the payment of rent for a building to house the post office. I am glad to know that this financial burden is to be lifted aud soon to be borne by the Government.

Okmulgee is entitled to a building that is not only attractive but one that will care for the future needs of all governmental activities. [Applause.]

I withdraw the pro forma amendment.

The CHAIRMAN. The Clerk will read.

The Clerk read as follows:

Sterling, Colo., post office, courthouse, etc.: For commencement of construction of tbe building, $00,000, under an estimated total cost, except for the courts, of $100,000: Provided, That such building shall be so constructed that accommodations for the courts may be added later.

Mr. WOOD. Mr. Chairman, I offer an amendment. The CHAIRMAN. The gentleman from Indiana offers an amendment, which the Clerk will report. The Clerk read as follows: .

Page 83, line 12, strike out "$100,000" and insert "$120,000."

The CHAIRMAN. The question is on agreeing to the amendment.

The amendment was agreed to.

The CHAIRMAN. The Clerk will read.

The Clerk resumed and concluded the reading of the bill.

Mr. WOOD. Mr. Chairman, I move that the committee do now rise and report the bill back to the House with the amendments, with the recommendation that the amendments be agreed to and that the bill as amended do pass.

The motion was agreed to.

Accordingly the committee rose; and the Speaker having resumed the chair. Mr. Treauway, Chairman of the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union, having had under consideration the 1)111 (H. R. 13873) making appropriations to supply deficiencies in certain appropriations for the fiscal year ending June 30. 1328, and prior fiscal years, to provide supplemental appropriations for the fiscal years ending June 30, 1928, and June 30, 1929, and for other purposes, reported that that committee had directed him to report the same back to the House with sundry amendments, with the recommendation that the amendments be agreed to and that the bill as amended do pass.

Mr. WOOD. Mr. Speaker, I move the previous question on the bill and all amendments thereto to final passage.

The previous question was ordered.

The SPEAKER. Is a separate vote demanded on any amendment? If not, the Clerk will report them in gross. The question is on agreeing to the amendments.

The amendments were agreed to.

The bill was ordered to be engrossed and read a third time, was read the third time, and passed.

On motion of Mr. Wood, a motion to reconsider the last vote was laid on the table.

DR. WALTER REED

Mr. BLAND. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent to extend my remarks on the life nnd character of Dr. Walter Reed and include therein a speech made by Col. J. Randolph Kenn, of the United States Army, now retired, delivered at the birthplace of Walter Reed.

The SPEAKER. Without objection, it is so ordered.

There was no objection.

Mr. BLAND. Mr. Speaker, Dr. Walter Reed was a world hero whose work brought Immeasurable blessing to mankind.

On Saturday, October 15, 1927, there was dedicated at Belroi, Gloucester County, Va., the birthplace of Dr. Walter Reed. The house in which Doctor Reed was born is still standing, and it has been restored as nearly as possible to the same condition that it was in when Doctor Reed was born there on the 13th day of September, 1851. His father was a minister of the Methodist Church and was stationed on thfe Gloucester circuit at the time of Walter Reed's birth.

This property was purchased by the Walter Reed Memorial Commission for the encouragement of research work upon the direction of the Medical Society of Virginia. Funds were raisf-d by popular subscription. The house has been restored, and when sufficient funds have been raised it is Intended to complete the restoration of the entire property, to furnish it in keeping with the period when Doctor Reed was born, to inclose the property, to plant shrubs and flowers, and to preserve the property as a national shrine In such condition as to make it a fitting memorial to the hero who was born there.

At the dedication on October 15, 1927, there was delivered a notable address by Col. Jefferson Randolph Kean, Medical Corps, United States Army, retired, editor of the Military Surgeon, Washington, D. C., former chief surgeon at Gen. Fitzhugh Lee's headquarters in Cuba when Doctor Reed's experiments were conducted. Colonel Kean was an intimate friend of Dr. Walter Reed and had personal knowledge of Doctor Reed's work. His speech is a valuable historical contribution to the life, character, and service of Doctor Reed and deserves preservation in the records of the Congress of the country which Doctor Reed served with such distinction and upon which he reflected such glory by his contribution to humanity.

I have sought and obtained permission to extend my remarks in the Rkcord by publishing the speech made by Colonel Kean at the dedication of Dr. Walter Reed's birthplace.

Colonel Kean said:

Ladles nnd gentlemen, In the lives of great men two places have In all ages and among all peoples had a peculiar Interest nnd sacred quality—that where they are born and that where, when life Is ended, their remains are laid to rest In the last sleep. It was my sad duty on a November day In 1902 to select the spot where Walter Ileed shonld rest, on a beautiful hillside In Virginia overlooking the Potomac nnd the Capitol, In that silent city where the soldier dead of the Republic sleep in their thousands In the consecrated fields that once belonged to the jjrent captain, Robert Lee. I feel it therefore a great privilege and honor to be present also at this spot where Walter Reed was born.

Sir William Osier said in one of liis addresses:

"Of the altruistic instincts, veneration is not the most highly developed at the present day; but I hold strongly with the statement that It Is the sign of a dry age when the great men of the past are held in light esteem."

It Is my hope and my belief that Virginia may never be dry In that sense.

To the Romans the word "pletas," which is our word piety, meant dutifulness, and it had reference not only to their attitude to their parents but to the spirits, or genii, of their dend and to the cult of the quaint little gods, the Lures and Penates, who presided over the family hearth and the domestic affairs. Their cult consisted In offerings of flowers or dainties from the table, and it has survived the ages In the offerings of flowers which we lay upon the graves of those we love.

It is to tills Roman belief that ho was always the object of observation and solicitude by splrltunl beings which be hnd been taught to venernte that gave to the Roman character, in the opinion of Pater, Its steadiness and regard for duty and dignity in all the affairs of life. I like to believe that we Virginians are in this sense n pious people, that we hold In high esteem the great men of the past, that In our lives we are not unmindful of them, and that we would like so to live as not to shame them. This is a cult which brings the great men of the pnst Into our lives, nnd will perpetuate their virtues and reproduce their qualities. It is such n feeling I am sure which has crowded the fnir enpitol of this State with the statues of soldiers and statesmen, has nitide shrines at Mount Vernon and M'onticello, and lias impelled your SUte Medical Society to purchase this humble dwelling, and

to dedicate It to the memory of the great man and choice spirit which here first saw the light of day.

Walter Reed was born on this spot September 13, 1851. the fifth nnd youngest child of Lemuel Sutton Reed and Pharaba White, bis first wife. Lemuel Reed, though he spent his adult life in Virginia as a minister of the Gospel, was a North Carolinian by birth, and It wns to the old North State that his now famous son went at the age of 25 to wed his chosen wife, Emille Lawrence—the gracious lady whom we have with us here to-day.

Of the 26 years of his Army life, much of Interest might be told did time permit, his varied experiences In his stations In the then far distant Arizona, In Nebraska, Alabama. Dakota, and posts farther west. It was not until 1893 that he became professor of bacteriology and clinical miscroscopy In the then newly organized Army Medical School and was able to devote himself to the special branch of medical science in which he attained enduring fame. But for this he had a year of preparation In 1890 when he was stationed In Baltimore and had the rare good fortune to study under that great scientist and grand old man, Dr. William II. Welch, now the Nestor of medical science in America. Never wns opportunity more eagerly seized or more profitably pursued. Then was made the liaison between matter and pupil which profoundly Influenced and guided the 12 brief years of life which the fates then allotted to Reed. I can not now undertake the narrative of even these few years. We have for the story of his life Howard Kelly's admirable biography and many shorter sketches, with some of which each of you Is doubtless familiar. I will therefore, if you will permit me, deport somewhat from the text which has been assigned me and give you some personal reminiscences of the man as I knew him and of bis work in Cuba as It came under my observation. He hnd been my predecessor at Fort Robinson in the uttermost parts of Nebraska, and I had heard much of his professional skill and his devotion to his patients, not only those In the garrison but the poor pioneers who gained a miserable existence by the cultivation of those arid plains.

My first acquaintance with Walter Reed came In July, 1896, when he came to my station at Key West, Fla., attracted by an epidemic of smallpox which then afflicted the town. He wished to study a curious nmebold body which he had observed In the blood of children and of the Rhesus monkey after vaccination, In the hope that It might be the much-sought cause of smallpox. In the mornings we went to the smallpox hospital to take blood from the victims of that loathsome disease; the afternoons he spent over his microscope; and the evenings were passed on the broad veranda looking out over the tranquil bay or at the strange stars in the southern sky while he told with whimsical humor tales of his life In the West. Except for a few days that I was his guest in Washington, I did not see him again for two years when came the Spanish War nnd the fever camps of the South. A lx>ard was ordered with Major Ret'd at the head nnd Majs. Victor C. Vanghan and Edward O. Shakespeare, both distinguished in the medical profession, to study these fevers. They went from camp to camp, observed, studied, and advised. They showed how the diagnosis could be made between the milder typhoids and malarial fever, for which the former were so commonly mistaken. Thus I saw Reed again when the board came to Gen. Fitzhugh Lee's camp of the Seventh Army Corps at Jacksonville, where the most Important hospital happened to be in my charge. The work lasted over a year, and their famous report, which shed a flood of light on the whole subject of the mode of sprend of typhoid fever in camps, had not been completed when Reed was ordered to Cuba in 1900.

His first visit to Habana was in Mnrch when he came to Investigate the use by the engineers of a disinfectant called electrozone. made by a patented process out of sea water. It was fondly hoped by many that the free use of this fluid on the streets of the city might banish diseases as well as smells and even disinfect the sewers and cespools. As may be Imagined this procedure received small support from Keed nnd was promptly abandoned.

The yellow-fever board, or commission as it Is usually called, wns created by War Department order, May 24, 1900, and was composed of Maj. Walter Reed and three acting assistant surgeons—James Carroll, Aristldes Agramonte, and Jesse W. Lazear. The two latter were already on duty in Cuba when Reed arrived there on June -5.

A severe epidemic was in progress in Habana and at the neighboring town of Marianao, where Gen. Fitzhugh Lee has his headquarters. He was In command of the two Provinces of Habnna and Plnar del Rio, which include the western end of the Island, but the city of Habnna was exeopted from his command and wns under another general. Major Gorgas was the health officer of the city, and I was the chief surgeon of General Lee's command, and hail sanitary control of tlie outside country. I had been taken with yellow fever on June 21 and was 111 when Reed landed on the morning of June 25, and lie hastened to visit me In the hospital at Camp Columbia. It pleases me to think that in my person lie saw the first case of the dread disease with which his fnme will be forever associated. The board was given quarters and laboratory space In a barrackllke wooden building belonging to tlie hospital and some half mile from General Lee's headquarters.

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