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The other memhcrg of the commission were capable and well-trained gclentlats.

James Carroll had risen from the ranks in the Army and by hard work and Reed's encouragement and assistance obtained his medical education. lie had been for several years Reed's laboratory assistant.

Arlstldes Agramontc was born in Cuba during the 10 years' war in which his father, a Cuban officer, was killed In battle by the Spanlards. His family had refugeed In the United States, and he had been educated in New York. He had graduated from the College of Physicians and Surgeons of New York In 1892 and at this time was in charge of the laboratory of the Division of Cuba In Habana. He is the only surviving member of the commission and has for many years been a distinguished professor In the school of medicine of the University of Habana. He has never received from the Government of the United States any honor or material reward for his share in the work of the commission.

Dr. Jesse W. Lazear, the fourth member of the commission, wag a graduate of Johns Hopkins. He then studied medicine at Columbia and was a classmate of Agramonte's at the College of Physicians and Surgeons. After graduation he studied in Europe, part of the time at the Pasteur Institute. When he came to Cuba he was bacteriologist to the medical staff at Johns Hopkins Hospital and was assistant In clinical microscopy in the university. He spent much time in the study of malaria and was expert in work with mosquitoes.

It seems to me that the time has come and is long overdue when our Government should show Its gratitude for the noble and beneficent work of these four men by an adequate and fitting provision for the families of those who died, and by suitable honorg and material rewards for the one who survives.

The first work of the board was to study the Bacttlus tcterofdei, which had been announced three years before by Sanarelll to be the cause of yellow fever. His claims were generally accepted and had been corroborated by two Investigators, Wasdln and GIddlngs, of the Public Health Service of the United States, who had been at work in Hnbnna since the American occupation of the city. Their claims had been disputed, however, by the findings of Agramonte, and the Reed board was Instructed to decide the matter. And they did decide it, In a report so clear, thorough, and conclusive that, though hotly contested by both Wasdln and Sanarelli at the time, their conclusions have ever since stood unshaken.

It was then decided on August 1 to study the theory that yellow fever wag conveyed by the mosquito. This theory had been advanced by several observers in preceding years, but its chief and, at that time, only proponent was Doctor Finley In Habana. He bad written a paper 20 years before advancing this theory and giving good epldemiological evidence in support of It. He had even fixed on the variety of mosquito which was the criminal, and had made many efforts to transmit the disease by its agency. He claimed some successes, but these results seemed to be doubtful. The reasons for his failures, for we know now that they were all failures, were the same that defeated the efforts of Reed's board in the first weeks of tbeir work.

Yellow fever had always been the most elusive and puzzling of diseases and had defeated the attempts of a multitude of able investigators to find out its secrets. A study of Lazejir's wonderfully detailed and accurate notes, including the Individual history of each of his mosquitoes, uncovered two traps:

The first Is that the yellow-fever patient ceases to have the infective agent in his blood after the third day of the disease and can not infect mosquitoes after that time.

The second trap is that after the mosquito has bitten a case of yellow fever, even In the first three days, she Is quite harmless for a period of Incubation of 12 to 14 days, after which she becomes able to Infect.

Now, it happens that In most cases yellow fever in the first three days is much like malaria and other fevers, and It is only nbout the third day that the patient begins to take on the characteristic yellow tluge and the diagnosis becomes certain. So It was quite natnral that the experimenter would take his mosquito to a well-marked yelluw-fever case more than three days old, and she would fall to become infected when Bhc bit.

This was trap No. 1, and If by good luck the experimenter escaped It and hit on a patient In the first three days, what would he do next? Naturally he would take the mosquito to the volunteer who agreed to be bitten, with as little loss of time as possible, for captive mosquitoes in jars and test tulies are delicate creatures and apt to die, or to be eaten by ants, or escape. So those who missed trip No. 1 were caught by trap No. 2 and, as we have said, none of Doctor Finlay's experiments got by both of them, nor did our board's at first.

Finlay's theory was, ng Gorgag once said to me, "a wonderful Instance of scientific clairvoyance."

Reed was called back to the United States during the first week in August on account of the death of Doctor Shakespeare, to put in order the manuscripts of the typhoid-fever board and the experiments began ti< bis absence.

They fed the supposedly Infected mogqnltoes eTery few day§ by letting them bite the arm of a member of the board or a volunteer, and these were not difficult to find among the young doctors and orderlies at the post hospital. On August 27 Lazear took his mosquitoes to Las Anlmas Hospital to be fed on yellow-fever patients, but one of them refused to bite. It happened that this Insect had bitten a man in the second day of fever 12 days before and was thus past both traps and was what we came to call "loaded "; but this fact was not then appreciated. As the insect appeared to be weak and liable to die, Carroll offered to feed it on his arm and did so. On the 30th Carroll felt badly and had a chill. He was thought to have malaria, and no one thought of yellow fever until the symptoms of that disease were apparent. Carroll thought so little of the mosquito bite and was so far from regarding it as a scientific experiment that he went Into the infected zone and even into the post-mortem room, where Agramonte was conducting an autopsy on a yellow fever case. This greatly vexed Reed when he returned and heard of it, as It vitiated to a large extent the value of the case as an experiment. When Carroll's diagnosis became clear, Lazear and Agramonte were greatly troubled but determined to verify the virulence of this mosquito By putting her on the first volunteer who presented himself. A young soldier of the Seventh Cavalry, Pvt. William H. Dean, came by the laboratory soon after they had agreed to do this (August 31) and readily agreed to feed the mosquitoes. He became sick five days later, and as he had been in the quarantined camp all the time and Bo could not have acquired yellow fever in any other way, the demonstration of mosquito conveyance wan perfect. A little later Lazear was bitten while feeding his mosquitoes in a yellow-fever ward by a mosquito not of his flock, and died September 25 after a few days' suffering of yellow fever in its most malignant form. His case as a demonstration was of even less value than Carroll's as he had been in frequent contact with cases of yellow fever. Such were the conditions when Reed returned from the United States a few dayg after Lazcar's death. The three cases, especially that of Dean, convinced him, and he determined to hasten back to the United States to report these cases to the American Public Health Association and also to consult the Surgeon General and his wise mentor, Doctor Welch, as to the next steps to be taken, for it was evident that this small and imperfectly controlled aeries of cases was not sufficient to convince the medical profession and the general public.

I had at that time returned from a short sick leave in the Stirtes and wag chief surgeon at Gen. Fitzbugh Lee's headquarters. When Iteed mentioned to me on October 11 bis intention to go to Habana next day to get General Wood's permission to go to the United States, I offered to get transportation and take him down. Accordingly, through the courtesy of the adjutant general. Major Michie, I got permission to use General Lee's fine horses and carriage, and so we drove down in great style. When we were on the road I urged him to ask General Wood for a considerable sum of money to pay the expenses of a series of experiments and give liberal bonuses to Spanish immigrants, who I wag sure could be induced in that way to volunteer, especially as they came to Cuba with always the probability of having yellow fever. He did not commit himself as to what he would do, and I awaited the interview with keen interest.

General Wood received us graciously, as be knew us both well and had taken a course of study under Reed. They stood facing each other in the embrasure of a window of the palace looking out on the Plaza de las Armas and to me, a silent observer, it wag a most dramatic scene with all the setting of a great historic moment. Looking out between them I could see Morro Castle and the blue waters of the harbor and on our left the ancient Fort la Fuerza, built by the gallant De Soto before he sailed northward to find his grave in the turbid current of the Mississippi. The two men offered a singular contrast In their appearance. General Wood, massive, leonine, Impassive; Keed, slender, alert, with mobile features and sparkling blue eyeg as he told the story of the three cases and summed up the evidence. Then, after a moment's pause, he said very earnestly, "General Wood, will you give me $10,000 to continue and complete these experiments?" General Wood's reply cnme almost without hesitation—"I have this morning signed a warrant for that amount to aid the police in the capture of criminals, and surely this work is of more importance to Cuba than the catching of a few thieves. I will give you $10,000 and if that proveg Insufficient I will give you $10,000 more."

We said good day to the military governor and with joyous hearts betook ourselves to the Paris restaurant, where we celebrated this happy outcome with a good luncheon, and I pledged bis success and future fame with a bottle of Rloja Clarete.

Next day Reed sailed for New York and read his paper before the American Public Health Association on October 24. There he encountered Wasdin full of his demonstration that B. sanareW was Its cause and that it was transmitted through the respiratory channel like measles or grippe. The clash was sharp, bitter, and personal on Wasdin's part, courteous and ImpcrBonnl on Reed's, but conclusive that the organism which had led Wnsdin and the rest of the world astray was common in the Tropics and was simply accidentally present In the bodies of some cases, and It was in fact a member of the hog-cholera group of bncteria.

Keed did not linger to enjoy his victory, and four days later he was back in Cuba eager to take up the work with all the facilities which General Wood's financial and moral support placed in his hands.

When Reed applied for the promised money General Wood told him that he would place It for disbursement In Kcan's hands, as he was an officer permanently on duty there and Iteed would be saved the worry of It. So this was done, and I acquired in a subordinate and business way a connection with this famous board.

The building of his experimental station. Camp Lnzear. where the tests should be made, was at once begun, and Spanish immigrants were readily found who for a handsome sum were willing to be bitten by the "little flies," and If they were taken sick to be nursed by the seiiorltiis Americanas, as they called the nurses. A most dramatic episode of this period was the volunteering of Moran and Kissinger to be the first victims of the experimentation. Kissinger was In fact the first case—a noble offer which has been often and fully told. These were followed by other American soldiers from the Hospital Corps, so that between the Americans and the Spaniards the supply of subjects for experiment was ample. The Spaniards furnished Keed much amusement, especially a Jolly young Spaniard peasant named Antonio Benlgno, but whom need called lion in to, which means a sweet potato, on account of his fondness for that vegetable. His contract with Reed In Spanish, signed by both, hnngs on the wall of my office. He was flrst to recover, and when I took his reward to him I got It in ten $20 gold pieces. The poor Spaniard had never seen such great coins or so much money, and his joy was that of a child with a new toy.

The revolting test of the infected clothing and bedding by Dr. Robert P. Cook—Virginian, by the way—and his six privates of the Hospital Corps, who slept In them by twos for 1)0 successive nights, was another heroic episode. All this makes it a wonderful and thrilling story, which Is well told In Kelly's admirable work.

Suffice it to say that his demonstrations carried conviction with them to the physicians of Habana, who bad remained Incredulous during the 20 years that Dr. Carlos Finlay had been laboring to convince them with arguments and experiments of this very thing. So then they bethought themselves of this dear old man who was at the head of the yellow-fever board, and 60 doctors of Habana gave him a dinner to celebrate the verification of the Finlay theory.

Dr. Juan Gulteras, who died this year In Habana, presided, and aa I recollect the military governor sat on one side of him and Doctor Finlny on the other. Reed, Carroll, and Agramonte were there and Gorgas and I and perhaps other medical officers. Gulteras, with his musical voice and admirable diction, undertook to divide the honors between Finlay and Reed. He compared this work to the demonstration that the Anopheles mosquito cnrrled malaria, which had been published by Ross two years before. Finlay was like Patrick Mnnson, who propounded the theory, and Reed was like Ross, who demonstrated It so that It was accepted by the scientific world. We all agreed that the simile was a good one and the division of credit just. But as the years have passed and the fame of Walter Reed has spread to all corners of the world our Cuban friends have come to ff«l that Finlay has not had his share. They do not realize that It Is to the demonstrator and not to the theorist that the world of science gives the highest place.

About the time that Doctor Finlay made the flrst announcement of his theory a distinguished physician of Washington, Dr. A. F. A. King, read a remarkable paper before the Philosophical Society, which was afterwards published In the Popular Science Monthly, entitled "Insects and disease—Mosquitoes and malaria," In which he pponounced bis theory that malaria was carried by mosquitoes and gave 19 good epidemiologlcal reasons In support of his theory. But It remained a barren theory, although It had later the powerful support of the father of tropical medicine, Patrick Manson, until Ross furnished the demonstration. Although Doctor King was loved and admired in Washington, an was Finlay in Habana, no one that I have beard has raised the cry that he lias been robbed of the fume and credit that Is due him, as the Cubanx have recently done in an official publication In the case of Doctor Finlay. Goldberger, of the Public Health Service, has stated the case in one pithy sentence. "Reed has converted a discredited theory Into an established doctrine."

My remarks have already taken too much time for me to make even a brief estimate of the value of Reed's work, or of the vast sum of human suffering and loss of life from this terrible plague which he made it possible to bring to an end. Professor Welch said of it In a letter to the Secretary of War:

"Doctor Reed's researches In yellow fever are by far the most Important contributions to science which have ever come from an Army surgeon. In my Judgment, they are the most valuable contributions to medicine and public hygiene which have ever been made in this country with the exception of the discovery of anaesthesia. They have led and will Ipiid to the saving of untold thousands of lives. I am in a position to know that the credit for thn original Ideas embodied in this work belong wholly to Major Reed. Snch work, If done iu ICurope, would receive substantial recognition from the goveruuicnt."

General Wood, whose recent death we still mourn, said:

"I know of no man on this side of the world who has done so much for humanity as Doctor Beed. His discovery results in the saving of more lives annually than were lost in the Cuban war, and saves the commercial interests of the world from a greater financial loss each yenr than the cost of the Cuban war. » • • Hereafter it will never be possible for yellow fever to gain such headway that quarantine will exist from the mouth of the Potomac to the month of the Rio Grande. Future generations will appreciate fully the value of Doctor Reed's services. His was the originating, directing, and controlling mind In this work and the others were assistants only."

It was stated In a recent biography of General Gorgas that Reed, when his demonstration wns complete, did not know what to do with It, that he did not see how mosquitoes could be successfully fought, and that his attitude in the first mouths of 1901 was one of pessimism and depression. ,

Nothing could be further from the truth. His letter to Dr. L. O. Howard, Chief of the Bureau of Entomology, at Washington, on January 13, 1901, rings with Joyful anticipation, and in it he says "with Howard and kerosene we will soon knock out old Culez fasclatus" ((he name applied at that time to the yellow-fever-bearing mosquito).

In the paper which he read to the Pan American Congress held in Hahana on February 4 the tenth conclusion is:

"The spread of yellow fever can be most effectually controlled by measures directed to the destruction of mosquitoes and the protection of the sick against the bites of these Insects."

This wns written at a time when Gorgas, according to his own statement, still was In doubt whether this was the only way or even the common way in which yellow fever was spread.

Such claims grievously misrepresent Gorgas. Between Reed and Gorgas, I am glad to Hay, there was never any rivalry or any feeling but the most cordial friendship and confidence. Their relation as they saw it was well expressed in a letter from Gorgas to Reed, dated from Habaiia August 20, 1001, in which he said:

"I am very happy to shine in the more humble rOle of being the first to put your discovery to extensive practical application."

The fame of Gorgas is secure In the performance of the greatest feat of sanitary administration that the world has seen. That of Beed Is admirably stated In the citation of President Eliot, of Harvard Cnisity, which Is the epitaph on Reed's tomb—

"He gave to man control of that dreadful scourge, yellow fever."

We here to-day may make for Walter Reud the proud boast of the Roman poet:

"Exes;! monumentum acre perennlus."

He has Indeed "built a monument more lasting than bronze and loftier than the pyramids of kings, which neither storms, nor winds, nor the immeasurable flight of time can destroy."

MESSAGES FROM THE PRESIDENT OF THE VNITED STATES

The Speaker laid before the House the following messages from the President of the United States, which were read, and, with the accompanying pajiers, were referred to the Committee on Foreign Affairs and ordered printed:

INTERNATIONAL AERONAUTICAL CONFEHENCE ON CIVIL AERONAUTICS (H. DOC. NO. ilOS)

To the Congress of the Vnited States:

I commend to the favorable consideration of the Congress the inclosed report from the Secretary of State with the accompanying papers, to the end that legislation may be enacted authorizing (1) the President to invite representatives of foreign Governments to attend an International Aeronautical Conference on Civil Aeronautics to be held in Washington. D. C.. December 12, 13. and 14 of this year, and (2) an appropriation of $24,700 for the expenses of such a conference in accordance with the recommendations of the Secretary of Commerce, as submitted through the Secretary of State.

Calvin Coolidce.

The White House, 3tav 18, 19S8.

INTERNATIONAL TEUCGRAPH CONFERENCE (II. DOC. NO. 309)

To the Congrex* of the United States:

I transmit herewith a report from tho Secretary of State requesting that the Congress be asked to enact legislation authorizing an appropriation in the sum of $10,800 to pay for the expenditures involved in the participation by the United States in the International Telegraph Conference to bt> held at Brussels, beginning about September 10, 1028.

I recommend Hint the Congress enact legislation authorizing an appropriation for the sum mentioned, in accordance with the recommendation of the Secretary of State.

Calvin Coolidoe.

The White House, May IS, W28.

ENROLLED BILLS SIGNED

Mr. CAMPBELL, from the Committee on Enrolled Bills, reported that they had examined and found truly enrolled bills of the following titles, when the Speaker signed the same:

H. R. 3470. An act grunting relief of Havert S. Sealy and Porteus K. Burke;

H. R. 8314. An act to amend an act of Congress approved March 4, 1027 (Public, No. 795, 69th Cong.), to provide for appointment as warrant officers of the Regular Army of such persons as would have been eligible therefor but for the interruption of their status, caused by military service rendered by them as commissioned officers during the World War;

H. R. 9508. An act to authorize the purchase at private sale of a tract of land in Louisiana, and for other purposes;

H. R. 10109. An act granting pensions and increase of pensions to widows and former widows of certain soldiers, sailors, and marines of the Civil War, and for other purposes;

H. R. 10363. An act to provide for the construction or purchase of two L boats for the War Department;

H. R. 10364. An act to provide for the construction or purchase of two motor mine yawls for the War Department;

H. R. 103G5. An act to provide for the construction or purchase of one heavy seagoing Air Corps retriever for the AVar Department;

H. R. 10786. An act authorizing surveys and Investigations to determine the best methods and means of utilizing the waters of the Gila River and its tributaries above the San Carlos Reservoir in New Mexico and Arizona;

H. R. 11133. An act making appropriations for the government of the District of Columbia and other activities chargeable in whole or iu part against the revenues of such District for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1929, and for other purposes; and

H. R. 12286. An act making appropriations for the Navy Department and the naval service for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1929, and for other purposes.

The SPEAKER announced his signature to enrolled bills of the Senate of the following titles:

8.2148. An act to fix standards for hampers, round stave baskets, and splint baskets for fruits and vegetables, and for other purposes;

S. 2463. An act to amend an act entitled "An act for the purchase of a tract of laud adjoining the United States target range at Auburn, Me," approved May 19, 1926; and

S. 3057. An act authorizing the Secretary of War to transfer and convey to the Portland Water District, a municipal corporation, the water pipe line including the submarine water main connecting Fort McKinley, Me., with the water system of the Portland Water District, and for other purposes.

JOINT RESOLUTION AND BILLS PRESENTED TO THE PRESIDENT

Mr. CAMPBELL, from the Committee on Enrolled Bills, reported that this day they presented to the President of the United States for his approval a joint resolution and bills of the House of the following titles:

H. J. Res. 263. Joint resolution authorizing the president and fellows of Harvard College to erect, on public grounds in the District of Columbia, a monument to Maj. Gen. Artemas Ward;

H. R. 2473. An act for the relief of Louie June;

H. R. 4012. An act for the relief of Charles R. Sles;

H. It. 4COO. An act to correct the military record of Charles E. Lowe; •

H. R. 4687. An act to correct the military record of Albert Campbell;

H. II. 4839. An act for the relief of the Press Publishing Co., Marianna, Ark.;

H. R. 5322. An act for the relief of John P. Stafford;

H. It. 5548. An act to authorize payment of six months' death gratuity to dependent relatives of officers, enlisted men, or nurses whose death results from wounds or disease not re-suiting from their own misconduct;

H. It. 5644. An act to enable an enlisted man In the naval service to make good time lost in excess of one day under certain conditions;

H. R. 5718. An act to amend the act entitled "An act to readjust the pay and allowances of the commissioned and enlisted personnel of the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, Coast and Geodetic Survey, and Public Health Service";

II. H. 582C. An act authorizing the Secretary of the Navy, in his discretion, to deliver to the custody of the Louisiana State Museum of the city of New Orleans, La., the silver bell iu use on the cruiser New Orleans;

II. R. 5030. An act for the relief of Jesse W. Bolsseau;

H. It. 6152. An act for the relief of Cromwell L. Harsley;

H. R, 6195. An act granting six months' pay to Constance D. Lathrop;

H. R. 6842. An act for the relief of Joseph F. Friend;

H. R. 6854. An act to add certain lands to the Montezuma National Forest, Colo., and for other purposes;

H. R. 7142. An act for the relief of Frank E. Ridg.-ly, deceased;

H. R. 7895. An act for the relief of the Lagrango Grocery Co.;

H. R. 7897. An act to ratify the action of a local board of sales control iu respect of contracts between the United States and the West Point Wholesale Grocery Co., of West Point, Ga.;

H, It. 7898. An act to ratify the action of a local board of sales control in respect of contracts between the United States and the Lagrunge Grocery Co., of Lagrange, Ga.;

H. It. 7903. An act to authorize the erection at Clinton, Sampson County, N. C., of a monument iu commemoration of William Rufus King, former Vice President of the United States;

H. R. 8031. An act for the relief of Higgins Lumber Co. (Inc.);

H. R. 8440. An act for the relief of F. C. Wallace;

H. It. 9046. An act to continue the allowance of Sioux benefits:

H. It. 9355. An act to provide for the acquisition of certain property in the District of Columbia for the Library of Congress, and for other purposes;

H. R. 9620. An act for the relief of E. H. Jennings, F. L. Johanns, and Henry Blank, officers and employees of the post office at Charleston, S. C.;

H. R. 9965. An act to erect a tablet or marker to mark the site of the Battle of Kettle Creek, in Wilkes County, Ga., where, on Fehruaiy 14, 1779, Elijah Clarke, of Georgia, and Colonel Pickens, of South Carolina, overtook the Tories under Colonel Boyd, .killing him and many of his followers, thus ending British dominion in Georgia;

H. R. 10503. An act for the relief of R. P. Washam, F. A. Slate, W. H. Sanders, W. A. McGinnis, J. E. Lindsay, and J. T. Pearson;

H. R. 11405. An act to acquire an area of State land situate in Lassen Volcanic National Park, State of California, by exchange;

H. R. 11021. An act to authorize the Secretary of the Navy to advance public funds to naval personnel under certain conditions;

H. R. 11724. An act to provide for the paving of the Government road, known as the Ringgold Road, extending from Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park, in the State of Georgia, to the town of Ringgold, Ga.. constituting an approach road to the Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park;

H. R. 12067. An act to set aside certain lands for the Chippewa Indians in the State of Minnesota.

II. R. 12192. An act authorizing the Secretary of the Interior to accept a deed to certain land and issue patent therefor to the city of Buhl, Twin Falls County. Idaho;

H. R. 12446. An act to approve a deed of conveyance of certain land in the Seneca Oil Spring Reservation. N. Y.;

H. R. 3470. An act granting relief to Havert S. Sealy and Porteus It. Burke;

H. R. 8314. An net to amend an act of Congress approved Manch 4. 1927 (Public, No. 795, 69th Cong.), to provide lor appointment as warrant officers of the Regular Army of such persons as would have been eligible therefor but for the interruption of their status, caused by military sen-ice rendered by them as commissioned officers during the World War:

II. It. 9568. An act to authorize the purchase at private sale of a tract of land in Louisiana, and for other purposes;

H. It. 10159. An act granting pensions and increase of pensions to widows and former widows of certain soldiers, sailors, and marines of tiie Civil War, and for other purposes;

H. It. 10303. An act to provide for the construction or purchase of two L boats for the War Department:

II. R. 10364. An act to provide for the construction or purchase of two motor mine yawls for the War Department;

H. R. 10365. An act to provide for the construction or purchase of one heavy sea-going Air Corps retriever for the Wnr Department:

H. It. 10780. An act authorizing surveys and investigations to determine the bixt methods and means of utilizing the waters of the Gila River and its tributaries above the San Carlos Reservoir in New Mexico and Arizona; and

H. R. 12286. An act making appropriations for the Navy Department and the naval service for the fiscal year ending Juno 30, 1929, and for other purposes.

LEAVB OF ABSENCE

By unanimous consent, leave of absence was granted to Mr.
Eaton (at the request of Mr. Bachabach), on account of
illness.

ADJOVKNMKXT

Mr. TILSON. Mr. Spanker, I move that the House do now
adjourn.

The motion wiis agreed to; accordingly (at 5 o'clock and 39
minutes p. m.) the House adjourned until to-morrow, Saturday,
May 19, 1928, at 12 o'clock noon.

COMMITTEE HEARING

Mr. TILSON submitted the following tentative list of com-
mittee hearings scheduled for Saturday, May 19, 1928, as re-
ported to the floor leader by clerks of the several committees:

COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURE

(11 a. m.)

To provide for the use of net weights In interstate and for-
eign commerce transactions in cotton, to provide for the stand-
ardization of bale covering for cotton (H. H. 10303).

EXECUTIVE COMMUNICATIONS, ETC.

Under clause 2 of Rule XXIV, executive communications were
taken from the Speaker's table and referred as follows:

530. A letter from the Comptroller General of the United
States, transmitting report on the claim of Christina Arbuckle,
administratrix of the estate of John Arbuckle, deceased, late of
the city and State of New York, together with his recommenda-
tions thereon ; to the Committee on Claims.

531. A letter from the Secretary of War, transmitting report
from the Chief of Engineers on preliminary examination and
irfan and estimate of cost of improvement of Puget Sound and
tributary waters, Washington, particularly in respect to the con-
dition of the channels and mouths of sand bars and other
obstructions by the use of a suction dredge or otherwise (H. Doc.
No. 307) ; to the Committee on Rivers and Harbors u«d ordered
to be printed.

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES ON PUBLIC BILLS AND
RESOLUTIONS

Under clause 2 of Rule XIII,

Mr. WOOD: Committee on Appropriations. H. R. 13873. A
bill making appropriations to supply deficiencies in certain ap-
propriations for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1928, and prior
fiscal years, to provide supplemental appropriations for the
fiscal years ending June 30, 1928, and June 30, 1929, and for
other purposes; without amendment (Rept No. 1731). Referred
to the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union.

Mr. COLTON: Committee Ob the Public Lands. 8.1131. An
act to encourage and promote the production of livestock in
connection with irrigated lands in the States of Wyoming, Mon-
tana, and New Mexico; with amendment (Rept. No. 1732).
Referred to the Committee of the Whole House on the state of
the Union.

Mr. GRAHAM: Committee on the Judiciary. H. R. 11285.
A bill to establish Federal prison camps; with amendment
(Rept. No. 1735). Referred to the House Calendar.

Mr. GRAHAM: Committee on the Judiciary. S. 4183. An
act authorizing the filling of a vacancy occurring in the office of
district judge for the northern district of Illinois created by the
act entitled "An act for the appointment of an additional circuit
judge for the fourth judicial circuit, for the appointment of
additional district judges for certain districts, providing for an
annual conference of certain judges, and for other purposes,"
approved September 14, 1922; without amendment (Rept. No.
1736). Referred to the House Calendar.

Mr. MORROW: Committee on Irrigation and Reclamation.
H. R, 6406. A bill granting the consent of Congress to compacts
or agreements between the States of New Mexico and Oklahoma
with respect to the division and apportionment of the waters
of the Cimarron River and all other streams in which such
States are jointly interested; without amendment (Rept. No.
1737). Referred to the House Calendar.

Mr. MORROW: Committee on Irrigation and Reclamation.
H. R. G4!)7. A bill granting the consent of Congress to compacts
or agreements between the States of New Mexico and Texas
with respect to the division and apportionment of the waters
of the Rio Grande, Pecos, and Canadian <>r Red Rivers, and
all other streams in which such States are jointly interested;
without amendment (Rept. No. 1738). Referred to the House
Calendar.

Mr. MORROW: Committee on Irrigation and Reclamation.
H. R. 6498. A bill granting the consent of Congress to com-
pacts or agreements between the States of New Mexico and
Colorado with respect to the division and apportionment of the
waters of the Rio Grande, San Juan, and Las Animas Rivers,
and all other streams in which such States are jointly inter-
ested; without amendment (Rept No. 1739). Referred to the
House Calendar.

Mr. MORROW: Committee on Irrigation and Reclamation.
H. R. G499. A bill granting the consent of Congress to com-
pacts or agreements between the States of New Mexico and
Arizona with respect to the division and apportionment of the
waters of the Gila and San Francisco Rivers and all other
streams in which such States are jointly interested; without
amendment (Rept. No. 1740). Referred to the House Calendar.

Mr. WHITE of Colorado: Committee on Irrigation and Recla-
mation. H. R. 7024. A bill granting the consent of Congress
to compacts or agreements between the States of Colorado
and New Mexico with respect to the division and apportion-
ment of the waters of the Rio Grande, San Juan, and Las
Animas Rivers, and all other streams in which such States
are jointly interested: without amendment (Rept. No. 1747).
Referred to the House Calendar.

Mr. WHITE of Colorado: Committee on Irrigation and Recla-
mation. H. R. 7025. A bill granting the consent of Congress
to compacts or agreements between the States of Colorado
and Kansas with respect to the division and apportionment of
the waters of the Arkansas River and all other streams in which
such States are jointly interested; without amendment (Hept
No. 1748). Referred to the House Calendar.

Mr. WHITE of Colorado: Committee on Irrigation and Recla-
mation. H. R. 7026. A bill granting the consent of Congress
to compacts or agreements between the States of Colorado and
Wyoming with respect to the division and apportionment of the
waters of the North Platte River and other streams in which
such States are jointly interested; without amendment (Rept
No. 1749). Referred to the House Calendar.

Mr. WHITE of Colorado: Committee on Irrigation and Recla-
mation. H. R. 7027. A bill granting the consent of Congress to
compacts or agreements between the States of Colorado and
Nebraska with respect to the division and apportionment of the
waters of the North Platte River and all other streams in
which such States are jointly interested: without amendment
(Rept. No. 1750). Referred to the House Calendar.

Mr. WHITE of Colorado: Committee on Irrigation and Recla-
mation. H. R. 7028. A bill granting the consent of Congress
to compacts or agreements between the States of Colorado and
Utah with respect to the division and apportionment of the
waters of the Colorado, Green, Bear, or Yampa, the White,
San Juan, and Dolores Rivers and all other streams in. which
such States are Jointly interested; without amendment (Hept.
No. 1751). Referred to the House Calendar.

Mrs. LANGLEY: Committee on Immigration and Naturalisa-
tion. H. R. 13791. A bill relating to the naturalization of cer-
tain aliens; without amendment (Rept. No. 1752). Referred
to the House Calendar.

Mr. HOGG: Committee on the Post Office and Post Roads.
H. R. 58. A bill to authorize the assignment of railway postal
clerks and substitute railway postal clerks to temporary em-
ployment as substitute senpost clerks; without amendment
(Rept. No. 1753). Referred to the Committee of the Whole
House on the state of the Unfon.

Sir. ELLIOTT: Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds.
S. 4035. An act authorizing conveyance to the city of Hart-
ford. Conn., of title to site and building of the present Federal
building in that city; without amendment (Rept. No. 1754).
Referred to the Committee of the Whole House on the state of
the Union.

Mr. ELLIOTT: Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds.
S. J. Res. 50. A joint resolution providing that the Secretary
of Agriculture be directed to give notice that on and after
January 1, 15)29, the Government will cease to maintain a
public market on Pennsylvania Avenue between Seventh and
Ninth Streets NW.; without amendment (Rept. No. 1755). Re-
ferred to the Committee of the Whole House on the state of
the Union.

Mr. MAcGREGOR: Committee on Expenditures in the Ex-
ecutive Departments. II. R, 12064. A bill to discontinue cer-
tain reports now required by law to be made annually to Con-
gress; with amendment (Rept No. 1757). Referred to the
Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union.

Mr. WINTER: Committee on Irrigation and Reclamation.
H. R. 115420. A bill to provide for the storage and diversion of
the waters of the North Platte River and construction of the
Casper-Alcova reclamation project; with amendment (Rept No.
1758). Referred to the Committee of the Whole House on the
state of the Union.

Sir. WINTER: Committee on Irrigation and Reclamation.
II. R. 13421. A bill to provide for the storage and diversion of
the waters of the North I'latte River and construction of the
Saratoga reclamation project: with amendment (Rept. No.
1759). Referred to the Committee of the Whole House on the
state of the Union.

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES ON PRIVATE BILLS AND
RESOLUTIONS

Under clause 2 of Rule XIII,

Mr. SPEAKS: Committee on Military Affairs. H. R. 3202.
"A bill for the relief of Elizabeth Hunt; with amendment (Rept.
No. IT.4!.'!). Referred to the Committee of the Whole House.

Mr. McSWAIN: Committee on Military Affairs. H. R. 12650.
A bill granting an honorable discharge to John F. Fleming;
with amendment (Rept. No. 1734). Referred to the Committee
of the Whole House.

Mr. LAMPERT: Committee on the District of Columbia.
H. R. 8388. A bill for the relief of Jennie Bruce Gallahan;
with amendment (Rept. No. 1742). Referred to the Committee
of the Whole House.

Mr. PORTER: Committee on Foreign Affairs. H. R. 9085.
A bill for the relief of Charles A. Moore; without amendment
(Rept. No. 1743). Referred to the Committee of the Whole
House.

Mr. SPEAKS: Committee on Military Affairs. H. R. 12359.
A bill for the relief of the widow of Edwin D. Morgan; without
amendment (Rept. No. 1744). Referred to the Committee of
the Whole House.

Mr. PORTER: Committee on Foreign Affairs. H. R. 12995.
A bill for the relief of Etta B. Leach Johnson; without amend-
ment (Rept. No. 1745). Referred to the Committee of the
Whole House.

Mr. BURDICK: Committee on Naval Affairs. H. R. 13795.
A bill for recognition of meritorious services performed by
Lieut. Commander Edward Ellsberg, Lieut. Henry Hartley, and
Boatswain Richard E. Hawes; without amendment (Rept. No.
1746). Referred to the Committee of the Whole House.

Mr. ELLIOTT: Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds.
H. R. 5!)52. A bill for the relief of Robert Michael White;
without amendment (Rept. No. 1756). Referred to the Com-
mittee of the Whole House.

PUBLIC BILLS AND RESOLUTIONS

Under clause 3 of Rule XXII, public bills and resolutions
were introduced and severally referred as follows:

By Mr. WOOD: A bill (H. R. 13873) making appropriations
to supply deficiencies in certain appropriations for the fiscal
year ending June 30, 1928, and prior fiscal years, to provide
supplemental appropriations for the fiscal years ending June
30. 1928, and June 30, 1929, and for other purposes; committed
to the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the
Union.

By Mr. BUSHONG: A bill (H. R. 13874) to further amend
the act of March 4, 1925, as amended March 3, 1926, and April
(!, 1926, to provide for the relief of the Bethlehem Steel Co.
and to further carry out the provisions of the award of the
National War Labor Board of July 31, 1918, and the action of
the War Department Claims Board of July 6, 1921; to the
Committee on Claims.

By Mr. CANNON: A hill (H. R. 13875) to amend the tariff
act of 1922, entitled "An act to provide revenue, to regulate
commerce with foreign countries, to encourage the industries
of the United States, and for other purposes "; to the Committee
on Wavs and Means.

By Mr. DREWRY: A bill (H. R. 13876) to authorize the
construction of barracks and mess hall for enlisted men at the
naval training station, Hampton Roads, Va.; to the Committee
on Naval Affairs.

By Mr. CELLER (by request): A bill (H. R. 13877) to
correct certain abuses and regulate and standardize the hours
of labor, leaves of absence, also sick and annual leave and leave
without pay. and the general conditions of labor at present
prevailing within the Treasury Department, especially amongst
the employees of the outdoor staff; to the Committee on the
Civil Service.

By Mr. W. T. FITZGERALD: A bill (H. R. 13878) to grant
a World War service compensation to soldiers, sailors, and
marines of the World War. their widows, minor children, and
helpless and dependent children; to the Committee on World
War Veterans' Legislation.

By Mr. RAGON: A bill (H. R. 13879) to declare Petit Jean
River a nonnavigable waterway; to the Committee on Interstate
and Foreign Commerce.

By Mr. RATHBONE: A bill (H. R. 13880) to regulate inter-
state and foreign commerce in bituminous coal; provide for
consolidations, mergers, and cooperative marketing; regulate
the fuel supply of interstate carriers; require the licensing of
corporations, producing and shipping coal in interstate com-
merce; and to creat a bituminous coal commission, and for
other purposes; to the Committee on Interstate and Foreign
Commerce.

By Mr. SOMERS of New York: A bill (H. R. 138S1) to
amend the act entitled "An act ivclassifying the salaries of
postmasters and employees of the Postal Service, readjusting
their salaries and compensation on an equitable basis, increas-
ing postal rates to provide for such readjustment, and for
other purposes," approved February 28, 1025; to the Com-
mittee on the Post OHice and Post Roads.

By Mr. VESTAL: A bill (H. R. 13882) to extend the benefits
of the Hatch Act and the Smith-Lever Act to the Territory of
Alaska; to the Committee on Agriculture.

By Mrs. ROGERS: A hill (H. R. 13883) to amend the act
(Public, No. 135, 68th Cong.) approved May 24, 1924, entitled
"An act for the reorganization and improvement of the Foreign
Service of the United States, and for other purposes "; to the
Committee on Foreign Affairs.

By Mr. BUTLER: A bill (H. R. 13884) to authorize the
Secretary of the Navy to proceed with the construction of
certain public works, and for other purposes; to the Committee
on Naval Affairs.

By Mr. WHITE of Colorado: A bill (H. R. 13885) to provide
for the applicability to certain classes of persons of the pro-
visions of articles 3 and 4 of the war risk insurance act, as
amended, and for other purposes; to the Committee on World
War Veterans' Legislation.

By Mr. SMITH: A bill (H. R. 138S6) authorizing the Secre-
tary of the Interior to issue patent to the District War Mothers,
Montpelier, Idaho, for 40 acres of public lands; to the Committee
on the Public Lands.

By Mr. LINTHICUM : Joint resolution (H. J. Res. 308) direct-
ing the Comptroller General of the United States to readjust
the accounts between the city of Baltimore and the United
States; to the Committee on the Judiciary.

By Mr. SIROVICH: Joint resolution (H. J. Res. 309) calling
upon the President of the United States to Issue a proclamation
every year designating the first week in May as national health
week; to the Committee on the Judiciary.

By Mr. MAGRADY: Joint resolution (H. J. Res. 310) pro-
posing an amendment to the Constitution of the United States
relative to equal rights for men and women; to the Committee
on the Judiciary.

By Mr. PORTER: Joint resolution (H. J. Res. 311) to pro-
vide an annual appropriation to meet the quota of the United
States toward the expenses of the International Technical Com-
mittee of Aerial Legal Experts; to the Committee on Foreign
Affairs.

By Mr. JOHNSON of Washington: Joint resolution (H.« J.
Res. 312) relating to the enforcement of the contract-labor
provisions of the immigration act of 1917; to the Committee on
Immigration and Naturalization.

By Mr. SMITH: Joint resolution (H. J. Res. 313) for the
improvement of the ice caves near Shoshone, Idaho; to the
Committee on the Public Lands. •

PRIVATE BILLS AND RESOLUTIONS

Under clause 1 of Rule XXII, private bills and resolutions
were introduced and severally referred as follows:

By Mr. BACHMANN: A bill (H. R. 13887) granting a pension
to J. Campbell Palmer; to the Committee on Pensions.

By Mr. FROTHINGHAM: A bill (H. R. 13888) for the relief
of Charles McCoombe; to the Committee on Claims.

By Mr. FULMER: A bill (H. R. 13889) for the relief of
Hattie L. Padgette; to the Committee on Claims.

By Mr. COLDER: A bill (H. R. 13890) for the relief of
John Thomas Lonergan; to the Committee on Naval Affairs.

By Mr. GREENWOOD: A bill (H. H. 13891) granting a
pension to Harriet J. Young; to the Committee on Invalid
Pensions.

By Mr. KURTZ: A bill (H. R. 13892) granting an Increase
of pension to Anna M. Shank; to the Committee on Invalid
Pensions.

By Mr. GCHAFER: A bill (H. R. 13893) for the relief of
Roland Zolesky; to the Committee on Claims.

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