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His cheerful looks a gayer dress put on, When Phoebus' felf return'd the Python's con.
His eyes with decent fury shone :

queror. Dangers but serv'd to heighten every grace, When every grove, with a triumphant song, And add an awful terror to the hero's face.

Confess'd the victor as he pass'd along :

Whilft with the trophies every hill was crown'd, Where'er in arms the great Naffau appears, And every echoing vale dispers'd his fame around Th'extreme of action's there:

As loud the British shores their voices raise, Himself the thickelt danger shares,

And thus united fing the godlike William's praison Himfelf th' informing foul that animates the war.

What the fam'd Merlin's sacred verse of old, Heroes of old in wondrous armour fought,

And Nostradam's prophetic lines foretold; By some immortal artist wrought :

To thee, oh happy Albion, 's shown,
Achilles' arms, and Ajax' seven-fold fhield,

And, in Nasau, the promise is out-done.
Were proof against the dangers of the field.

Behold a prince indulgent heaven has sent,
But greater William darcs his breast expose

Thy boundless wishes to content :
Unarm'd, unguarded to his foes :

A propher great indood, whose powerful hand
A thousand deaths and ruins round him filed,

Shall vanquish hosts of plagues, and heal the But durft not violate his sacred head;

groaning land. For angels guard the prince's life and throne, Who for his empire's safety thus neglects his own.

The great Nassau now leads thy armies forth, Had he in ages past the sceptre sway'd,

And shows the world the British worth :
When facred rites were unto heroes paid;

Beneath his conduct they securely fight,
His statue had on every altar Itood,

Their cloud by day, their guardian flamic by nights His court a temple been, his greater self a god.

His bounty too shall every bard inspire,

Reward their labours, and protect their lyre; Now tune thy lyre, my muse, now raise thy For poets are to warlike princes dear, voice,

And they are valiant William's care: Let Albion hear, her distant Mores rejoice : His victories instruct them how to write, Thy solemn Pæans now prepare,

William's the glorious theme and patron of their Sweet as the hymns that fillid the air,

wit.

ÆSOP AT COURT; OR, SELECT FABLES, 1702.

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1

ÆSOP TO THE KING.
Victorious prince! formod for supreme com-

mand,
Worthy the empire of the seas and land!
Whilft impious fa&tion (wells with native pride,
Parties diftract the frate, and church divide!
And lenseleis libels, with audacious style,
Insult thy Senate, and thy power revile !
Vouchsafe to hear th' aduired truths of old,
Which birds and beasts in sportive tales unfold;
To curb the info lent, advance the good,
And quell the ragings of the multitude.
O fam'd for arms, and matchless in renown!
Permit old #lop to approach thy throne:
To you the labours of his muse belong ;
Accept the humble, but instructive song,

That fountain, from whose watery bed
Th' ungrateful flood was daily fed.

And thus the rabble waves began:
“ We're the delight of gods and man!
How charming do our banks appear!
How swift the stream, the flood how clear

" See how, by nature's bounty strong,
We whirl our legion waves along :
In sofe meanders winding play,
And glitter in the face of day.

" Bat thou, poor fountain, filly soul!"
Thy head absconding in a hole,
Run'st meddling on from place to place,
Asham'd to show thy dirty face ;
In rocks and gloomy caverns found,
Thou creep'lt inglorious under ground:
D' you hear? henceforth your lords obey !
We the grand waves assume thc fway."

“ Well, angry firs, the fountain cry'd,
And how's your streams to be fupply'd ?
Ye lenfelets foois, that would command,
Should I withdraw my bounceous hand,

FABLE I.

THE RIVER AND THE FOUNTAINS,
A river, infolent with pride,
The fountain and its springs dified;

Or backward turn my watery store,

TAL MORAL. That hour you'd cease, and be no more.

Tyrants can only be restrain'd by might, Go ask that blustering fop the wind,

Power's their conscience, and the sword their rigts: That puts this whimsy in your mind,

Allies they court, to compals private ends, And makes your factious lurges rise,

But at the dividend disclaim their friends If he'll recruit you with supplies.

Yet boast not, France, of thy successful fraud, « And when to native mud you turn,

Maintain'd by blood, a torment whilft enjoy'd;

Imperial Cælar drives the fiorm along, Such as a common-sewer would scorn,

And Nassau's arms avenge the public wrong.
Too late you'll curse this frantic w him,
When carriers' steeds fhall piss a nobler stream.

FABLE III.
TXE MORAL.
Unhappy Britain ! I deplore thy fate,

TIE BLIND WOMAN AND NER DOCTORS,
When juries pack'd, and brib'd, insult thy state :
Like waves tumultuous, infolently wise,

A WEALTHY matron, now grown elde They tutor kings, and senators advise ;

Was weak in every part : Whilft old republicans direct the stream,

AMided fore with rheums and cold, Not france and Rome, buc monarcb's their Yet pretty found at heart.

aim : Fools rode by koaves! and paid as they deserve,

But most her eyes began to fail,

Depriv'd of needful light: Despis'd whilft us’d! then left to hang or starve.

Nor could her spectacles avail,

To re&ify their light.
FABLE II.

Receipts the try'd, he do&ors fees,
THE LION'S TREATY OF PARTITION.

And spar'd for no advice

Of men of skill, or quacks for need
A MIGHTY lion hcretofore,

That practise on sore eyes.
Of monfrous paws and dreadful roar,
Was bent upon a chase :

Salves they daub'd on, and plaisters botá, Inviting friends and near allies

And this, and that was done : Frankly to share the sport and prize,

Then flannels, and a forehead-cloth, During the hunting-space.

To bind and keep them on. The lyox and royal panther came,

Her house, though small, was furnih'd The boar and wolf of Wolfingham,

And every room did thine The articles were these :

With pidures, tapestry, and plate,
Share and share like, whate'er they got,

All rich, and wondrous fine.
The dividend upop the spot,
And so depart in peace.

Whilft they kept blind the filly foul,

Their hands found work enough! A royal hart, delicious meat!

They pilfer'd plate, and goods ebey ftola De in'd by inauspicious face,

Till all was carry'd off.
Was started for the game :

When they undam'd their patient's cres
The hunters run him one and all,
The chase was long, and, at the fall,

And now pray how's your right:

Cries e other, this was my advice, Each enter'd with his claim.

I knew 't would set you right. One lov'd a haunch, and one a fide,

Like a fuck pig the woman star'd, This ate it powder'd, c'other dried,

And up and down the run : Each for bis share alone :

With naked house and walls quite scar'd
Old grey beard then began to roar,

She found herself undone.
The wbikers twirl'd bully'd, and swore,
The hart was all his own,

“ Doctors, quoth fe, your core's my pain,

For what are eyes to me : # And thus I prove my title good;

Bring falves and forehead-cloths again,
My friend deceas'd sprung from our blood,

I've nothing left to fee."
Hall's mine as we're ally'd :
My valour claims the other part,
In short I love a hunted hart:

See, injur'd Britain, thy unhappy case,
And who dares now divide ?"

Thou patient with distemper'd eges: The bilk'd confederates they ftare,

State-quacks but nourish the diseale,

And thrive by treacherous advice.
Aod cry'd, " old gentleman, deal fair,
For once be just and true."

If fond of the expensive pain,
Quoth he, and, looking wondrous grum,

When eighteen millions run on score ! « Behold my paws, the word is mum;

Let them clap mufflers on again, And so, ineflicurs, adicu!".

And phylic abec of eighteen nicre.

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THE MORAL.

'' Towser, quoth he, I'm for a fair ; FABLE IV.

Be regent in my room :

Pray of my tender flocks take care,
THE SATYR'S ADDRESS.

And keep all safe at home.
Five satyrs of the woodland fort,

I know thee watchful, just, and brave,
Though politicians then :

Right worthy such a place :
Their ears prick'd up, their noses short,
And brows adorn'd like aldermen;

No wily fox shall thec deceive,

Nor wolf dare fhow his face."
With afses hoofs, great gogle eyes,
And ample chins of Be-m's size :

But ne'er did wolves a fold infest,

At regent Towser's rate :
To Jove tript up with an address,

He din'd and supp'd upon the best,
In favour of the plains :
That it would please him to suppress

And frequent brcakfasts ate.
All heats and colds, his winds and rains; The farmer oft receiv'd advice,
The sun that he'd extinguish too,

And laugh'd at the report : And in the skies hang something new.

But, coming on him by surprise, * My wife reforming friends, quoth Jove,

Just found him at the fport. Our elements are good!

“ Ingrateful beaft, quoth he, what means We manage for the best above,

Thac bloody mouth and paws? Though not so rightly understood;

I know the base, the treacherous stains, But since such profound squires are sent,

Thy breach of trust and laws. We'll treat you like the cream of Kent."

The fruits of my past love I see; Then Jove brought out ætherial fire

Roger, the halter bring ; In a gilt chafing-dith :

E'en truss him on that pippin tree,
The sparkling flame they all admire,

And let friend Towser swing.
'Twas fine, they vow'd, as heart could wish :
They gap'd, they grinn'd, they jump'd about ! I'll spare the familh'd wolf and fox,
Jove, give us that, the sun put out!

That ne'er my bounty knew :

But, as the guardian of my flocks,
The charming flames they all embrace,

This neckcloth is your due."
Which, urg'd by Nature's lawe, 1
Their shaggy hides set in a blaze,

When ministers their prince abuse,
And soundly fing'd their paws;

And on the subjects prey:
In corners then they sneak'd with terror dumb, With ancient monarchs 'twas in use,
And o'er th' immortal pavements scud it home. To send them Towser's way.
How fenseless are our modern Whiggish tools,

FABLE VI.
Beneath the dignity o! British fools!
With beef resolv'd, and fortify'd with ale,

THE FOX AND BRAMBL..
They censure monarchs, and at senates rail;

Ren, an old poacher after game, So eagerly to public mischief run,

Saw grapes look tempting fine : That they prevent the hands, which loo them on.

But, now grown impotent and lame, O true machines! and heads devoid of brains!

Could not command the vine ; Affront that fenate which your rights maintains !

His lips he lick'd, stood ogleing with his eyes, Thus ideors sport with power, and Aames embrace, Straind at a running jump, but miss'd the prizes Till smarting folly glares chem in the face.

Quoth he, that honest bush hard-by
FABLE V.

Might give a friend a lift :
In croth, its curtesy I'll try,

And venture for a shift.
Taere dwelt a farmer in the west,

Without more words he bounces to the top. As we're in story told;

But gor'd and wounded is compellid to drop Whose herds were large and flocks the best

Down Reynard came, batter'd and core, That ever lin'd a fold.

He blow'd and lick'd his paws : Arm'd with a staff, his rufset coat,

Then mutter'd to himself and swore, And Towser by his fide,

Curfing the faral cause;

[scorn, Early and late he tun'd his throat

Damn'd rascal shrub, quoth he, whom hedge-takes And every wolf defy'd.

Beneath a furs-bush, or the scoundrel thorn: Lov'd Towser was bis heart's delight,

« Good words, friend Ren, the bush reply'da In cringe and fawning skill'd,

Here no encroacher 'scapes : Satrusted with the flocks by night,

Those foxes that on brambles ride And guardian of the field.

Love thorns, as well as grapes;

THE MORAL.

TIE MORAL.

THE FARMER AND HIS DOG.

THE MORAL.

But better language would your mouth become :: Thy dread tribunal now creat at home,
If you muft curse, go curse the fool at home." And, arm'd with vengeance, to her rescue come

In power her baseft enemies remain,
Who first offend, chen in disputes engage, Oppress thy subjects, and thy trealures drzis :
Should check their passions and indecent rage : With sums immense chey raise their tor:unten
But peevish age, of weak resentments proud, Though armies itarve, and fleets Degkeleddet
Like woman's stubborn, impotent, and loud.

Bane of the war! curse of thy martial reiga! Ill-manners never found a just pretence,

You share the toil and dangers, they the gaia;
And rude expresions show a barren sense : To justice then the known offenders bring,
But, when high birth descends to mean abuse, Avenge thy people, and affert the king.
The crime runs foulest, and finds no excuse.

FABLE VIII.
FABLE VII.

THE FOX AND WEAZLE.

AN OWL AND THE SUN.

To the late Honourable the Commifioners of tbe Prize. A Saucy buflle-headed owl
Office.

One morning on the sun fell soul,
A NEEDY Weazle heretofore,

Because it made him blind: Very rapacious, lank, and poor ;

Buc by his sophiftry you'll guess That had no place, small comings-in,

Him not of the Athenian race, And liv'd in terror of the gin;

But a more modern kind, Nor got a morsel to his hole,

The morn was fragrant, cool, and bright, But what he either begg'd or stole;

The sun illustrious with his light, One night a foraging for prey,

Dispensing warmth to all: He found a store hvuse in his way:

Madge on a pinnacle was got, Each cranny then he nimbly paft;

Sputtering and hooting like a sot, With lantern jaws and flender waist;

And thus began the brawl. And made long time his quarters good,

“ D'ye hear, you prince of red-fac'd looks! On flaughter'd mice and wheaten food.

Hot-headed puppy! foe to owls! But, growing corpulent and round,

Why this offensive blaze? Too small the wide chink was found :

Behind some cloud go sneak alide, And now he squeez'd and thrust in vain,

Your carbuncles and rubies hide, For liberty and home again,

And quench that flaming face. A fox that chanc'd to stroll that way,

“ When I'm a taking the fresh air, For meditation's sake, or prey, Stood grinning at him for a while,

Whip in my eyes you come full glare,

And so much rudeness how! With rogueifh looks and sneering smile;

I wonder when the modeft moon And though he shrewdiy gave a guess,

Would serve an owl as you have done,
Yet ask'd him how and what's the cale;

Or tan and burn one fo!
And why his weazlethip would keep
In durance vile, and play bo-peep.

Bright Phæbus smil'd at what was said,
Quoth he, “ Alack, Sir, I was lean,

And cry'd, “ 'Tis well, Sir Logger-bead,

You're neither sense nor shame!
Haggard and poor, when I came in :

Because a blinking fool can't bear
A skeleton, mere skin and bone !
Though now so gross and bulky grown,

An object so cranfcending fair,

The sun muft take the blame.
That, with good cheer and dainties fed,
My rump is bigger than my head.

Shall I the universe benight,
But if a helping paw you'll lend,

And rob the injur'd world of light, To force a board, and serve a friend;

Because you rail and scoul; So fain I would my bacon fave,

When birds of the most abjet fort I'll kiss your foot, and live your fave."

Deride and grin you for their sport,

And treat you like an owl ?"
Quoth Ren,“ We doctors hold it best,
After a long debauch, to fast:

THE MORAL.
Then as for discipline, 'tis fit,

Who libel senates, and traduce the great, You take a quantum fufficit.

Measure the public good by private hate : Slacken with abstinence your skin,

Interest's their rule of love ; fierce to oppole And you'll return as you got in :

All whom fuperior virtue makes their focs. For, till each collop you refund,

Thy merits, Rochester “, thus give offence; You're like to quarter in Lob's-pound.”

The guilty faction hates difcerning fense: Cæsar, no more in foreign camps expofe

Laurence Hyde, Earl of Rochester, Your sacred life, to Britain's generous fucs:

Lieutenant of Ireland. See an accouer et bia * “ Supplement to snitt."

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THE MORAL.

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This Harley t, Seymour |, Howe Ś, and Mack. With every sweet harmonious note worth find,

He charm'd the listening throng: Great eye fores to the loud rapacious kind; The hooting cuckow, was displeas'd alonc, But, whilst in holes addressing owls repinc,

Condemn'd his manner, and extoll'd her own. Brighe as the fun their patriot names will fhine.

“ This screaming fop, quoth fhe, chat scares

All creatures with his din ;
FABLE IX.

When folks are listening to my airs,
THE SEA AND THE BANKS.

Forsooth he's putting in.

Here's such a chattering kept, and odious noise, As out at sea a ruffling gale it blew, And clouds o'ercast the gloomy kies :

My song's quite Spoild with his confounded

voice." The surges they began to rise, And terrify the sailors, jocund crew.

The injur'd songster modestly reply'd;

“ Since you perform fo fine, This to the wanton billows was but sport,

The contest let some judge decide, They roar'd and gambol'd it along,

And try your skill with mine; This was the burden of their song,

Vanquish'd, I'll your superior genius own." They'd have a storm, and show good reason for':.

The cuckow shook her head, and cry'd 'twas dones Then a fresh maggot takes them in the head,

A solemn plodding ass that graz'd the plain To have one merry jaunt on fhore:

Was for an umpire chose : They'd not be fetter'd up, they swore,

The nightingale advanc'd his frain, But thus to the insulied margin said :

And charm'd with every close. Hey, Plugs! d'ye hear, ye lazy hounds!

The cuckow's note 'was one unvary'd tone, Open to right and left! make way,

Exceeding hoarse, yet pleas’d, le roar'd it on. And give free paTage to the sea,

Appeal was made ; the judge this sentence gave, Down with your ramparts and obfèructing mounds. “ You, firrah, nightingale ! “ See how they stir! awake, ye brutes :

Of music you some smarterings have, And let us have one frisk at land;

And may in time do well; Or, 'zbud, we'll wash you into sand,

But for substantial song, I needs must say, Without the tedious form of long disputes.”

My friend, the cuckow, bears the bell away." “ Hold! soft and fair! the banks reply'd ; we're bound,

Mackworth *, who reads thy well-digested lines, In honour, to make good our post:

Where eloquence with nervous reason shines, Ard will, for ail your windy boast,

Secs art and judgment flow through every pages As barriers to the sea, maintain our ground. The patriot’s zeal free from indecent rage; Go, lord it in your watery realms, the main !

So pure thy style, thy manners so refin'd, There rage and bluster as you please,

Your pen transmits the candour of your mind, Licentious in your native seas,

Yet happier he that has the answer wrote, Bat not an inch as trespaffers you'll gain.

In penury of sense, and dearth of thought :

Whilft alles judge, and fadion claims a vote, So, my fierce mutineers, be jogging home!

Abusive nonsense is th' admired note; For if you dare invade our coast,

Where want of art and manners merit praise, You'll run your heads against a post, And Thamefully retire in empty foam.”

He robs the cuckow of her ancient bays.

THE MORAL.

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