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"Then cometh the end, when he shall have deliver ed up the kingdom to God, even the Father; when he shall have put down ALL rule and ALL authority and power. For he must reign till he hath put ALL enemies under his feet. The last enemy that shall be destroyed is death. For he hath put ALL things under his feet. But when he saith, ALL things are put under him, it is manifest that he is excepted, which did put ALL things under him. And when ALL things shall be subdued unto him, then shall the Son also himself be subject unto him that put ALL things under him, that God may be ALL in ALL."

Here is an example in point. The word all occurs ten times in the course of five verses, and, agreeable to your own words," without any mark of distinction." The definition of the word is-the whole, every one, every thing, quite, completely, altogether, the whole quantity, every part.

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Be pleased now to furnish a reply to your own question, Is it credible, that God should use the same word, in the same sentence [or connexion] in totally different senses? If you answer, yes, I grant it, and Paul gives the exception, expressing most forcibly, that but for this manifest exception, even Jehovah, the self-existent author of the universe, would be included in the catalogue! My intention is not to dwell on the glorious and soul-cheering topic at present. It is left for your consideration, in company with your rule for understanding it.

"But the only fair rule of interpretaçion is to understand words in their original and proper sense in all cases in which their meaning is not necessarily restricted by the subject or connexion."

Should you find ALL to be necessarily restricted, further than the exception noticed by the Apostle, you will not fail to give the information.

Yours,

CANDIDUS.

NOTE TO THE READER.

In the closing paragraph of Letter 5. Mr. H. says, But I feel that I am detaining you too long on this criticism of words." Perhaps he was correct in the premises. I do not feel that they have been unnecessarily detained in the present remarks. If words are the signs of ideas, the more clear these signs are made to our apprehension, the more certain will be our understanding of the ideas thus communicated. If the reader has gained one step towards the truth by this attempt, the writer will enjoy the satisfaction of having written to good purpose, and the reader will not certainly complain. As the Rev. author of the Letters has furnished the reader a note, recommending," Edwards against Chauncey, Appleton's Lectures, and Dwight's Theology," as "books with which Universalists would do well to be better acquainted," the readers of the Inquirer shall be furnished with an extract of the first named work soon, which will suffice for a specimen. In return for this advice, Mr. H. and his readers, and all others who dare to read an unanswerable performance, are invited to read Balfour's Inquiry, one volume of which contains more information, and more irrefutable argument, founded on invincible facts, than all orthodox publications since the dawn of time.

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SIR-In giving opinions, merely, a man may err from the truth, and honestly endeavour to maintain sentiments which subsequent examination will demonstrate to be fallacious. To those who thus err, we

extend the hand of charity, for to them is applicable the Latin adage, humanum est errare. But I deeply regret to say, that the tenor of your Letters, more deeply implicates the feelings of the heart, than the determination of the judgment. If, in narrating what you term facts (relative to the effects of Universalism) the departure from truth is so obvious as to be discovered at the first blush, what shall be said of the palpable departure from rectitude which is manifest in your mis-citations from scripture! Let the following, from an orthodox publication, reply to the question.

"It behoves us to guard against misquoting Scrip. ture, not only from reverence to Deity, but also, from regard to the cause of truth. If a misquotation be brought in support of error, so far as it has influence, truth must suffer by it. If it be adduced for the establishment of truth, when its inaccuracy is detected, opponents will triumph as if the victory were gained. She needs no such aids; but stands more securely without them."

I shall now quote a full paragraph from Letter V. the principal portion of which is garbled. The intelligent reader will recollect that several of these passages have been anticipated in a previous number, with remarks, exhibiting their misapplication. If this system of mutilation is proof of any theory, the time has come, when the scoff of infidelity is reduced to a self-evident proposition.-If a total disregard to the persons addressed, or to whom the language applies, the time to which it refers, and the connexion in which it is found-be all of no importance; then is it true, that "the Bible is an old instrument, on which any man can play the tune which best pleases him." I now request, that each reader will consider himself as a juror in a capital case, and reply as under the sanction of an oath does the language of the cited

paragraph, in a single instance, convey the definite idea of a future state? If not, the theory of endless suffering must be relinquished, or sought from some other source.

"In the New Testament we read of those who shall be severed from the just; who shall be cast into outer darkness; who shall depart into everlasting fire; who shall lose their souls; who shall be destroyed soul and body in hell; who shall not see life, but the wrath of God abideth on them; they shall be shut out from Abraham and all the prophets; the Judge at the END of the world [aion, age, the Jewish dispensation] shall send forth his angels, and gather them out of his kingdom, and cast them into a furnace of fire; they are reserved unto the day of Judgment to be punished; who shall be punished with everlasting destruction from the presence of the Lord and the glory of his power; the smoke of their torment ascendeth up for ever and ever; they are bound hand and foot and cast into outer darkness; they receive their good things, their portion in this life, and are tormented in the life to come; an impassable gulf is placed between them and the blessed; they die in their sins; where Christ is gone they cannot come; they never have forgiveness; they shall come out of their graves unto the resurrection of damnation; the mist of darkness is reserved to them for ever; the heavens and the earth which now are, are kept in store, reserved unto fire against the day of Judgment and perdition of ungodly men; God shall send them strong delusions that they should believe a lie, that they all might be damned who have pleasure in unrighteousness; there is a sin unto death for which we are not to pray, and which shall not be forgiven, neither in this world nor in the world, to come; their names shall be blotted out of the book of life; they are clouds, carried with a tempest, for which is re

extend the hand of charity, for to them is applicable the Latin adage, humanum est errare. But I deeply regret to say, that the tenor of your Letters, more deeply implicates the feelings of the heart, than the determination of the judgment. If, in narrating what you term facts (relative to the effects of Universalism) the departure from truth is so obvious as to be discovered at the first blush, what shall be said of the palpable departure from rectitude which is manifest in your mis-citations from scripture! Let the following, from an orthodox publication, reply to the ques

tion.

"It behoves us to guard against misquoting Scrip. ture, not only from reverence to Deity, but also, from regard to the cause of truth. If a misquotation be brought in support of error, so far as it has influence, truth must suffer by it. If it be adduced for the establishment of truth, when its inaccuracy is detected, opponents will triumph as if the victory were gained. She needs no such aids; but stands more securely without them."

I shall now quote a full paragraph from Letter V. the principal portion of which is garbled. The intelligent reader will recollect that several of these passages have been anticipated in a previous number, with remarks, exhibiting their misapplication. If this system of mutilation is proof of any theory, the time has come, when the scoff of infidelity is reduced to a self-evident proposition.-If a total disregard to the persons addressed, or to whom the language applies, the time to which it refers, and the connexion in which it is found-be all of no importance; then is it true, that "the Bible is an old instrument, on which any man can play the tune which best pleases him." I now request, that each reader will consider himself as a juror in a capital case, and reply as under the sanction of an oath-does the language of the cited

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