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From the Earliest Accounts of Time to the present Period;

WHEREIN

THEIR REMARKABLE ACTIONS AND SUFFERINGS,
THEIR VIRTUES, VICES, PARTS, AND LEARNING,

ARE ACCỦRATELY RECORDED AND DISPLAYED':

With CATALOGUES OF THEIR LITERARY PRODUCTIONS.

A NEW EDITION, IN EIGHT VOLUMES.
Corrected, Enlarged, and greatly Improved; with the Addition of many Hundreds

of New Lives, never Published before.

v 0 L.

IV.

LONDON:

PRINTED FOR THE PROPRIETORS;
AND SOLD BY ALL BOOKSELLERS IN TOWN AND COUNTRY-,

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ACCOUNTS

OF THE

LIVES AND WRITINGS

OF THE MOST

Eminent Persons

IN

EVERY AGE AND NATION.

LÍFFORD (George), the third earl of Cumberland, very eminent for his skill 'in navigation, was born in the year 1558, and educated at Peter-house, in Cambridge, where he

had for his tutor the celebrated John Whitgift, afterwards archbishop of Canterbury. In this place he applied himself chiefly to the study of the mathematics, which his genius led hiin to; whereby he became qualified for the several great expeditions he undertook afterwards.

The first time he had any public employment was in the year 1586, when he was one of the peers who sat in judgment upon Mary queen of Scots: but having a greater inclination to act by sea than by land, and (according to the fathion in the brave and warlike reign of queen Elizabeth) being bent on ntaking foreigni discoveries, and defeating the ambitious designs of the Sp niard, who was preparing his Invincible Armada for conquering England, he fitted out, at his own charge, a little fleet; confifling of three Thips, and a pinnace, with a view to send them into the South Sea, on purpose to annoy the Spanish settlements there. His first voyage was in the year 1586, which was rather tedious and unsuccessful; he returned to England the ensuing year, September the 29th, and then went, with many other English noblemen and gentlemen, to the relief of Sluys, at that time besieged by the duke of Parma ; but at his arrival he found the place surrendered. In 1588 he was one of those A 2

brave

brave persons who put themselves on board the English fleet, to oppose the Spanish Armada that was advancing to invade England. He commanded, on that occasion, the Elizabeth Bonaventure, and signalized himself in a remarkable manner; especially in the last engagement with the Spaniards, near Calais. Queen Elizabeth was so pleafed with his good services, that she granted him a commission, dated October 4, 1588, to pursue his intended voyage to the South Sea; and, for his greater honour and encouragement, lent him one of her own royal ships, named the Golden Lion, to be the admiral. This he victualled and furnished at his own charge; and sailed about the end of O&tober, attended with many brave English 'gentlemen. In the Channel he took a ship of Dunkirk, named the Hare, laden with merchandize for Spain, which he sent home; but contrary winds at first, and afterwards a violent storm, which forced him to cut his main-malt by the board, deprived him of all farther hopes and ability to prosecute his designs on the Spanish coasts, so that he returned to England. However, not discouraged by this unhappy disappointment, he undertook a third voyage to the West Indies in 1589. For that purpose he obtained the queen's leave, and one ship of the royal navy, called the Victory; to which adding three other small fhips, furnished at his own expence with about four hundred men, and all necessaries, he set sail from Plymouth the 18th of June. He now made several valuable seizures, but experienced all the hardships of a tedious voyage.

The earl, in attempting to leize a Brazil ship, seeing captain Lister 'had boldly carried off the companion, had two parts of his own men killed or wounded, and received himself three thots upon bis shield, and a fourth on his side, though not deep ; his head was likewise broken with stones, and all covered with blood, and both his head and legs were much burned with granadoes; notwithstanding which, they had the good fortune to make themselves masters of a Portugueze thip, of 110 tons, freighted with sugar and Brazil wood; and two days after of another, between three and four hundred tons, loaden with hides, cochineal, sugar, china dihes, and silver. After being now kept out at sea by storms and contrary winds, and reduced to the greatest extremities, he arrived safe at Falmouth on the 29th of December.

In 1591 his lorddhip undertook a fourth voyage to the coast of Spain, with five ships, fitted out at his own charge. He sailed from England in May, and, in his way to the Spanith coasts, found several Dutch ships coming from Lisbon loaden with spices, which he took out of them. These spices he determined to send to England, in a Thip guarded by the Golden Noble, his rear-admiral; but they were taken in a calm, by some Portugueze gallies from Penicha, one of the captains, with several of the men, llain, and the rest car ied prifoners to Penicha, and from thence to Lisbon. His lordship took, besides the spices just now mentioned, a vessel freighted with wine,

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