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for portions of units or fractional units the fractions remaining may be embraced in a single entry if it conforms to the requirements of said act of February 19, 1909. Persons owning and occupying less than 320 acres acquired under the provisions of the homestead laws or having unperfected homestead entries for less than 320 acres within the area affected by this Proclamation have an equal right with other applicants to secure the additional area to which they

are entitled. Requirements.

3. Applications to enter may be executed before the Register and Receiver of the United States land office for the district in which the lands are situated at Dodge City, Kansas, or before a United States Commissioner, or a judge or a clerk of a court of record in the county in which the land is situated, or before any such officer outside the county and in the land district who is nearest or most accessible to the land. The agent's affidavit to each declaratory statement filed by agent must be sworn to by the agent before one of such officers on or after November 1, 1915, but the power of attorney appointing the agent may be sworn to by the declarant on or after the date hereof before any officer in the United States having a seal and authority to administer oaths. After applications have been so sworn to, they must be presented to the Register and Receiver at Dodge City, Kansas, accompanied by the required fees and commissions. Applicants may present the applications in person, by mail, or otherwise. No person shall be permitted to present more than one application in his own behalf.

4. Each application to make entry must be accompanied by a fee of $5 if the area applied for is less than 81 acres, or $10 if 81 acres or more, and commissions at the rate of $0.02; for each acre applied for outside the limits of the railroad grant, or $0.05 for each acre applied for within such limits, and each declaratory statement must be

accompanied by a fee of $2. Disposition of appli

5. All applications to make homestead or additional homestead entry and declaratory statements received by the Register and Receiver of the United States land office at Dodge City on or after November 1, 1915, and on or before November 26, 1915, will be treated as filed simultaneously, and where there is no conflict such applications and statements, if in proper form and accompanied by

the required payment, will be allowed on December 1, 1915. In Conflicting applicae case of conflicting applications and only one of the applicants alleges

settlement initiated prior to the reservation and since maintained, his application shall be allowed and the others rejected. If two or more conflicting applications are received, each containing allegations of such prior settlement, a hearing shall be ordered to determine the

priority of right and it shall be restricted to those alleging such right. Drawings.

Where there

are applications or statements conflicting in whole or in part, in which no one of the several applicants claims such prior settlement, the rights of the respective applicants will be determined by a public drawing to be conducted by the Register and Receiver at the United States land office at Dodge City, Kansas, beginning at ten o'clock a. m. on December 1, 1915. The names of the persons who presented the conflicting applications and statements will be written on cards and these cards shall be placed in envelopes upon which there are no distinctive or identifying marks. These envelopes shall be thoroughly and impartially mixed, and, after being mixed, shall be drawn one at a time by some disinterested person. As the envelopes are drawn the cards shall be removed, numbered beginning

with number one, and fastened to the applications of the proper Action on applica persons, which shall be the order in which the applications and state

ments shall be acted upon and disposed of. If homestead application or declaratory statement can not be allowed for any part of the land

cations.

tions.

Hons.

applied for, it shall be rejected. If

If it may be allowed for part of, but not at, the land applied for, the applicant or the declarant through his agent shall be allowed thirty days from receipt of notice within which to notify the Register and Receiver what disposition to make thereof. During such time, he may request that the application or statement be allowed for the land not in conflict and rejected as to the land in conflict, or that it be rejected as to all the land applied for; or he may apply to have the application or statement amended to include other land which is subject to entry and to inclusion in his application or statement, provided he is the prior applicant. If it is determined by the drawing that a declaratory statement shall be acted upon and disposed of before a homestead application for the same land, the homestead applicant shall be allowed thirty days from receipt of notice within which to advise the Register and Receiver whether to allow the application subject to the declaratory statement, or to reject the same. If an applicant, or a declarant or his agent, in such cases fails to notify the Register and Receiver within the time allowed what disposition to make of the application or statement, it will be rejected as to all the land applied for. Homestead applications and declaratory statements presented after November 26, 1915, will be received and noted in the order of their filing, and will be acted upon and disposed of in the usual manner after all such applications and statements presented on or before that date have been acted upon and disposed of.

6. Persons having valid subsisting rights to enter any portion of the Subsisting rights. lands to be opened under this Proclamation may file their applications on and after November 1, 1915, and should make such applications as promptly after such date as they can conveniently do so.

7. None of the lands to be opened under this Proclamation shall Time of opening. become subject to settlement and entry from and including December 1, 1915, until and including January 29, 1916, except in the manner prescribed herein, and all persons are admonished not to make settlement during such period on lands not covered by filings or entries made by them under this Proclamation; Provided, however, that lowcaminations nothing herein shall prevent persons from going upon and over the lands to examine them with a view to making entry thereof when the lands shall become subject thereto in accordance herewith. At nine o'clock a. m. on January 31, 1916, all of the lands opened under this Proclamation not otherwise withdrawn or reserved and which en Disposal of lands not have not been entered or filed upon in the manner herein provided will become subject to settlement and entry under the provisions of the land laws applicable thereto.

8. The Secretary of the Interior is hereby authorized to make and prescribe such rules and regulations as may be necessary to carry the provisions of this Proclamation into full force and effect.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF I have hereunto set my hand and
caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
Done at the City of Washington this fourteenth day of October in

the
year

of our Lord nineteen hundred and fifteen and of (SEAL.) the Independence of the United States the one hundred and fortieth.

WOODROW WILSON
By the President:
ROBERT LANSING

Secretary of State.

al

Regulations.

Octobor 19, 1915.

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

A PROCLAMATION.

Declaration of

ex

Export of arms, etc. WHEREAS, a Joint Resolution of Congress, approved March 14th,
Preamble.
Vol. 37, p. 630. 1912, reads and provides as follows:-"That whenever the President

shall find that in any American country conditions of domestic vio-
lence exist which are promoted by the use of arms or munitions of
war procured from the United States, and shall make proclamation
thereof, it shall be unlawful to export except under such limitations
and exceptions as the President shall prescribe any arms or munitions
of war from any place in the United States to such country until
otherwise ordered by the President or by Congress”;

And whereas, it is provided by Section II of the said Joint Resolution, “That any shipment of material hereby declared unlawful after such a proclamation shall be punishable by a fine not exceeding ten thousand dollars, or imprisonment not exceeding two years, or both":

Now, therefore, I, Woodrow Wilson, President of the United isten en of de mestic vio- States of America, acting under and by virtue of the authority con

ferred in me by the said Joint Resolution of Congress, do hereby declare and proclaim that I have found that there exist in Mexico such conditions of domestic violence promoted by the use of arms or munitions of war procured from the United States as contemplated by the said Joint Resolution; and I do hereby admonish all citizens

of the United States and every person to abstain from every violaWarning against il- tion of the provisions of the Joint Resolution above set forth, hereby

made applicable to Mexico, and I do hereby warn them that all

violations of such provisions will be rigorously prosecuted. And I Officers to enforce do hereby enjoin upon all officers of the United States, charged with

the execution of the laws thereof, the utmost diligence in preventing violations of the said Joint Resolution and this my Proclamation issued thereunder, and in bringing to trial and punishment any offenders against the same.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the soal of the United States to be affixed. Done at the City of Washington this nineteenth day of October in

the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and (SEAL.) fifteen and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and fortieth.

WOODROW WILSOX
By the President:
ROBERT LANSING,

Secretary of State.

of

legal shipment arms, etc., thereto.

laws.

October 20, 1915.

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

A PROCLAMATION

Thanksgiving Day, It has long been the honoured custom of our people to turn in the 1915. Preamble. fruitful autumn of the year in praise and thanksgiving to Almighty

God for his many blessings and mercies to us as a nation. The year that is now drawing to a close since we last observed our day of tional thanksgiving has been, while a year of discipline because of the mighty forces of war and of change which have disturbed the world, also a year of special blessing for us.

Another year of peace has been vouchsafed us; another year in which not only to take thought of our duty to ourselves and to mankind but also to adjust ourselves to the many responsibilities thrust upon us by a war which has involved almost the whole of Europe.

We have been able to assert our rights and the rights of mankind without breach of friendship with the great nations with whom we have had to deal; and while we have asserted rights we have been able also to perform duties and exercise privileges of succour and helpfulness which should serve to demonstrate our desire to make the offices of friendship the means of truly disinterested and unselfish service. Our ability to serve all who could avail themselves of our services in the midst of crisis has been increased, by a gracious Providence, by more and more abundant crops; our ample financial resources have enabled us to steady the markets of the world and facilitate necessary movements of commerce which the war might otherwise have rendered impossible; and our people have come more and more to a sober realization of the part they have been called upon to play in a time when all the world is shaken by unparalleled distresses and disasters. The extraordinary circumstances of such a time have done much to quicken our national consciousness and deepen and confirm our confidence in the principles of peace and freedom by which we have always sought to be guided. Out of darkness and perplexity have come firmer counsels of policy and clearer perceptions of the essential welfare of the nation. We have prospered while other peoples were at war, but our prosperity has been vouchsafed us, we believe, only that we might the better perform the functions which war rendered it impossible for them to perform. Now, THEREFORE, I, WOODROW WILSON, President of the ber 25, 1913; appointed

, United States of America, do hereby designate Thursday the twenty- as a day of general fifth of November next as a day of thanksgiving and prayer, and invite the people throughout the land to cease from their wonted occupations and in their several homes and places of Worship render thanks to Almighty God.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed. DONE at the City of Washington this twentieth day of October

in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and (SEAL.] fifteen and of the independence of the United States of America the one hundred and fortieth.

WOODROW WILSON
By the President:
ROBERT LANSING,

Secretary of State.

thanksgiving.

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,

November 11, 1915.

A PROCLAMATION.

War between Bul. and

France, Great Britain, Italy,

WHEREAS a state of war unhappily exists between France, Great garia Britain, Italy and Servia on the one side and Bulgaria on the other; and a ser visit

And Whereas the United States is on terms of friendship and amity Preamble. with the contending powers, and with the persons inhabiting their several dominions;

And Whereas there are citizens of the United States residing within the territories or dominions of each of the said belligerents and carrying on commerce, trade, or other business or pursuits therein;

And Whereas there are subjects of each of the said belligerents residing within the territory or jurisdiction of the United States, and carrying on commerce, trade, or other business or pursuits therein;

And Whereas the laws and treaties of the United States, without interfering with the free expression of opinion and sympathy, or with the commercial manufacture or sale of arms or munitions of war,

Declaration of neutrality.

Acts forbidden in United States territory.

nevertheless impose upon all persons who may be within their territory and jurisdiction the duty of an impartial neutrality during the existence of the contest;

And Whereas it is the duty of a neutral government not to permit or suffer the making of its waters subservient to the purposes of war;

Now, Therefore, I, Woodrow Wilson, President of the United States of America, in order to preserve the neutrality of the United States and of its citizens and of persons within its territory and jurisdiction, and to enforce its laws and treaties, and in order that all persons, being warned of the general tenor of the laws and treaties of the United States in this behalf, and of the law of nations, may thus be

prevented from any violation of the same, do hereby declare and proVol. 35, pp. 1089–1091. claim that by certain provisions of the act approved on the 4th day

of March, A. D. 1909, commonly known as the “Penal Code of the United States” the following acts are forbidden to be done, under severe penalties, within the territory and jurisdiction of the United States, to-wit:

1. Accepting and exercising a commission to serve any of the said belligerents by land or by sea against the other belligerent or belligerents.

2. Enlisting or entering into the service of any of the said belligerents as a soldier, or as a marine, or seaman on board of any vessel of war, letter of marque, or privateer.

3. Hiring or retaining another person to enlist or enter himself in the service of any of the said belligerents as a soldier, or as a marine, or seaman on board of any vessel of war, letter of marque, or privateer.

4. Hiring another person to go beyond the limits or jurisdiction of the United States with intent to be enlisted as aforesaid.

5. Hiring another person to go beyond the limits of the United States with intent to be entered into service as aforesaid,

6. Retaining another person to go beyond the limits of the United

States with intent to be enlisted as aforesaid. Rights of transients.

7. Retaining another person to go beyond the limits of the United States with intent to be entered into service as aforesaid. (But the said act is not to be construed to extend to a citizen or subject of any of the belligerents who, being transiently within the United States, shall, on board of any vessel of war, which at the time of its arrival within the United States, was fitted and equipped as such vessel of war, enlist or enter himself or hire or retain another subject or citizen of the same belligerent, who is transiently within the United States, to enlist or enter himself to serve such belligerent on board such vessel of war, if the United States shall then be at peace with such belligerent.)

8. Fitting out and arming, or attempting to fit out and arm, or procuring to be fitted out and armed, or knowingly, being concerned in the furnishing, fitting out, or arming of any ship or vessel with intent that such ship or vessel shall be employed in the service of any of the said belligerents.

9. Issuing or delivering a commission within the territory or jurisdiction of the United States for any ship or vessel to the intent that she may be employed as aforesaid.

10. Increasing or augmenting, or procuring to be increased or augmented, or knowingly being concerned in increasing or augmenting, the force of any ship of war, cruiser, or other armed vessel, which at the time of her arrival within the United States was a ship of war, cruiser, or armed vessel in the service of any of the said belligerents, or belonging to the subjects of any, by adding to the number of guns of such vessels, or by changing those on board of her for guns of a larger calibre, or by the addition thereto of any equipment solely applicable to war.

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