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politics at the time, and to the desire of that Government to guarantee the peace and prosperity of the Dominican Republic. I will also copy the answer at the foot of each document:

It is very distressing to me to know that your duties as Provisional President bave proved so irksome, but I earnestly hope that you will continue to discharge them for the illotted time, in the interests of humanity and peace; and I can hardly doubt that every good clement will join in supporting the Provisional Government and thus perform their patriotic duty toward the Dominican Reputlic, in whose welfare the United States is so vitally interested. I assure you that your efforts on behalf of the Dominican people will receive from the Government of the United States the sincerest and most earnest support.

WM. H. Tarr. I'resident Taft,

Washington : Accept this expression of my gratitude for Your Excellency's message, received today. Like you, I hope that all good Dominicans will fulfill their patriotic duty to the Republic, which a long and cruel civil war has caused to suffer greatly. I must trust to the good faithi of iny fellow-citizens, who are well aware of the sentiment of the great American people, pioneers of liberty and justice, and of the desires of their Government.

The limit of my tenure will depend on circumstances, and it is my fiscd intention to leave it as soon as the whole country is pacified.

In my name and that of the Dominican people receive, Mr. President, the expression of the most sincere gratitude.

ADOLFO A. SOVEL. The most sympathetic interest is felt by the President and Government of the United States in your unselfish and patriotic efforts to maintain lawful and orderly government and to introduce needful reforms, thus assuring to the Dominican nation the blessings of prosperity and peace. The President and Government of the United States sincerely wish that your patient endeavors may so succeed as to exclude the possibility of a recurrence of such disorders as have afllicted the Dominican people. Those disorders would by their recurrence make more onerous the duty of the United States under its conventional and moral obligations never to be indifferent to tbe peace and order of the Dominican Republic

War. 11. TAFT. President Taft,

Washington : I am profoundly touched by the generous interest of the Government and people of the United States and their hope that my persevering efforts for the peace and prosperity of the Dominican nation may prove so successful as to exclude all possibility of a recurrence of the disorders that have afflicted it.

Notwithstanding the obstacles which the former state of war and its consequences bave caused, I earnestly trust--and I beg Your Excellency to share this trust-tbat the occasion may not arise for the Government of the United States to fulfill in a manner painful to the Dominican people its moral obligations and those imposed by the Convention of 1907.

PRESIDEYT Norel.

POLITICAL AFFAIRS-RESIGNATION OF PRESIDENT NOUEL;

ELECTION AND INAUGURATION OF PRESIDENT BORDAS; REVOLUTION; MEASURES IN REGARD THERETO TAKEN BY THE UNITED STATES; OBSERVATION OF DOMINICAN ELECTIONS BY UNITED STATES OFFICIALS.1

File No. 839.00/777.

The American Minister to the Secretary of State.

[Telegram--Paraphrase.)

AMERICAN LEGATION,

Santo Domingo, January 15, 1913. President Nouel advised me this morning of a plot to gain possession of the fort here by prominent Horacista generals. Horacio Vásquez himself denounced the plot and offered to place himself and some of his followers in the fort to maintain order.

The Archbishop [President Nouel] has for some time been uirged arbitrarily to abolish the present Congress and make himself dictator.

• Continued from For. Rel. 1912, pp. 340-380.

He has absolutely refused and is thinking of convoking Congress in extraordinary session to consider constitutional reforms and other matters.

He expresses himself as despondent over the probabilities of success in his efforts for good government unless the Government of the United States takes an active part in controlling elections and the establishment of a government expressing the will of the people. He therefore requests me to obtain from you if possible a statement that can be made public as to the necessity of such a step on our part if the disorders of the past should tend to recur.

RUSSELL.

File No. 839.00/777.

The Secretary of State to the American Minister.

[Telegram--Paraphrase. I

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, January 22, 1913. The following statement may be given to President Nouel as a message from me, to be made public if he sees fit:

The most sympathetic interest is felt by the President and Government of the l'nited States in your unselfish and patriotic efforts to maintain lawful and orderly government and to introduce needful reforms, thus assuring to the Dominican nation the blessings of prosperity and peace. The President and Government of the United States sincerely wish that your patient endeavors may so succeed as to exclude the possibility of a recurrence of such disorders as bare afflicted the Dominican people. Those disorders would by their recurrence make more onerous the duty of die United States under its conventional and oral obligations never to be indifferent to the peace and order of the Dominican Republic.

You will do everything in your power to hold up the hands of the President, Archbishop Nouel, and to impress him with the necessity of patiently continuing in office. It would be well to advert in your conversations to the fact that under the present electoral law it is apparently almost impossible to accomplish much in the direction ef free elections, however willing the Government of the United States might be to lend its aid; and that as a prerequisite to free elections it would seem indispensable to provide some form of previous registration and some form of voting that would prevent fraud. You might also suggest in informal conversation that besides the electoral law other reforms seem to the Department to be urgently needed, and that these might possibly be accomplished without reform of the Constitution. For instance, reform of the laws relating to provincial and communal governments, the law of conscription (so as to provide for an annual enlistment by lot instead of at the will of local military chiefs), and the creation of a right to question arrest by means of habeas corpus or other such proceedings.

You might also point out to the President how much easier it would be for the United States to lend its aid if necessary to assist in the conduct of free and orderly elections if such reforms were realized.

File No. 839.00/785.
The American Minister to the Secretary of State.
[Telegram--Paraphrase.)

AMERICAN LEGATION,

Santo Domingo, January 24, 1913. The Department's statement for publication was given to the press and telegraphed to the governors of all the provinces. The Archbishop requests me to answer you as follows:

I am profoundly touched by the generous interest of the Government and people of the United States and their hope that my persevering efforts for the peace and prosperity of the Dominican nation may prove so successful as to exclude all possibility of a recurrence of the disorders that have afflicted it.

Notwithstanding the obstacles which the former state of war and its consequences have caused, I earnestly trust-and I beg Your Excellency to share this trust—that the occasion may not arise for the Government of the United States to fulfill in a manner painful to the Dominican people its moral obligations and those imposed by the Convention of 1907.

RUSSELL, File No. 839.00/802. The American Minister to the Secretary of State. (Telegram---Paraphrase.)

AMERICAN LEGATION,

Santo Domingo, February 28, 1913. Congress convened yesterday in ordinary session. The President presented his message, which contained many proposals of reform.

RUSSELL.

File No. 839.00/807.
The American Chargé d'Affaires to the Secretary of State.

(Telegrams---Paraphrases.)

AMERICAN LEGATION,

Santo Domingo, March 14, 1913. President Nouel will resign early in April, if not sooner. His brother, the Minister of the Interior, promises to give me the earliest information as to the exact date. The President's health is said to have improved slightly but the doctors forbid his resuming work until after a complete rest. He is in Barahona recuperating.

All are aware of the approaching resignation and are preparing accordingly. Vidal and Arias are supposedly working together. Vásquez is well prepared. Velásquez is said to be the choice of Congress.

At least one gunboat should be here all the time, not leaving for coal unless replaced by another.

CURTIS.

File No. 839.00/808.

AMERICAN LEGATION,

Santo Domingo, March 19, 1913. The Archbishop will resign the presidency probably Tuesday or Wednesday of next week, according to information received this morning from his brother, Secretary Nouel, who desires me to have an

additional gunboat at this capital for moral effect. I have consulted with the commander of the Wheeling and we conclude that it is advisable to have a second gunboat within call, preferable at Mayaguez or in Samaná Bay, since the cutting of the telegraph lines across the island will probably be the first act of any new revolution.

CURTIS.

File No. 839.00/808.

The Acting Secretary of State to the American Chargé d'Affaires.

[Telegram--Paraphrase.)

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, March 20, 1913. Deliver to the President of the Dominican Republic the following telegram from the President:

I regret to learn that your arduous official duties have so impaired your health as to cause Your Excellency seriously to consider resigning the Presidency of the Dominican Republic.

Permit me to say that I earnestly hope Your Excellency will reconsider a purpose that might be so prejudicial to order in the Republic and that you may continue in office at least until an election can be held that shall permit the free expression of the Dominican people.

I assure Your Excellency of my earnest sympathy in your difficult and patriotic effort to promote the welfare of your country, and of my hope for its

success.

ADEE.

File No. 839,00/811,
The American Chargé d'Affaires to the Secretary of State.

(Telegram--Paraphrase.)

AMERICAN LEGATION,

Santo Domingo, March 24, 1913. I gave the President's message to the Minister for Foreign Affairs, who sent it to President Nouel at Barahona by the Minister of the Interior. The Minister for Foreign Affairs informs me today that he is sending the response of the Archbishop directly to the President. The Archbishop expects to continue in the presidency until Arias reaches Cibao, about the beginning of next week.

The Ministers of Foreign Affairs, Interior and Finance, and exPresident Jiménez, have all asked for an increased naval force here, for moral effect. A large ship is urged by the Minister for Foreign Affairs, on the ground that in this country there is a widespread expectation that the Government of the United States will henceforth leave the Latin American republics entirely to themselves. Except for this I can see no present necessity.

CURTIS.

File No. 839.00/814.
The President of the Dominican Republic to the President.

[Telegram-Translation.)

Santo DOMINGO, March 24, 1913. I sincerely thank you for the message that Your Excellency has just addressed to me upon learning of my intention to resign the Presidency of the Republic because of my broken health. It would have been my greatest desire to attain constitutional reform and, under protection thereof, that such free elections might be held as would guarantee the peace and the future of the Republic. The lenewed assurances of sympathy from Your Excellency to my Gorernment are for me and for the Dominican people a motive of real satisfaction.

PRESIDENT NOUEL.

File No. 839.00/812.
The Acting Secretary of State to the American Chargé d'Affaires.

[Telegram-Paraphrase.]

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, March 24, 1913. The revenue cutter Algonquin will proceed at once to Dominican waters to establish radio communication with the Wheeling.

ADEE.

File No. 839.00/816.
The American Chargé d'Affaires to the Secretary of State.

[Telegrams--Paraphrases. ]

AMERICAN LEGATION,

Santo Domingo, March 26, 1913. Algonquin established radio communication with Wheeling today. Consul at Puerto Plata requested to inform commander of Algonquin in case the telegraph lines across the island are cut, and to ask him to communicate immediately with the Wheeling.

CURTIS.

File No. 839.00/818.

AMERICAN LEGATION,

Santo Domingo, March 31, 1913. The resignation of President Nouel was presented to Congress this morning, and was accepted. Order is being maintained.

CURTIS. File No. 839.00/819. The American Consul at Puerto Plata to the Secretary of State.

[Telegrams-Paraphrases.)

PUERTO PLATA, April 1, 1913. Arias yesterday agreed with Vásquez here to resist election of Velásquez. Cibao apparently united to make war in case of election of Velásquez.

THAWAY.

File No. 839.00/824.

PUERTO PLATA, April 6, 1913. General José Bordas Valdés was unanimously chosen President by the Senate yesterday, on first reading.

HATHAWAY.

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