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File No. 882.42/9.

The Acting Secretary of State to the President of the American

Colonization Society.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, October 7, 1911. Sir: Your attention is invited to the Department's letter of June 27 last, enclosing copy of one received from Mr. Ernest Lyon, the Liberian Consul General at Baltimore, relative to the payment to the Liberian Government of the accrued Donovan Fund, for the purpose of which the Department has been asked to designate an official to approve the Society's accounts, to receive the balance due, amounting to about $60,000, and to give the Society proper acquittance. No reply has been received by the Department to this letter of June 27, 1911.

From the files of the Department it appears that on February 20, 1909, you wrote to Mr. Robert Bacon, then Secretary of State, to the effect that the American Colonization Society had approximately $22,000 which was available for educational purposes of the public schools of Liberia, and an annual income of about $3,500 which, under certain conditions, might also become available for the same purpose. To insure this money being applied to the specific purpose mentioned by you, it was suggested by you that the funds be received by the Department and by it transmitted to the American Minister at Monrovia subject to the order of the Superintendent of Public Instruction of Liberia to be expended solely for educational purposes of the public schools and that in the event of doubt and misunderstanding arising in connection with the expenditure or disbursement of the moners thus transmitted, all such questions should be submitted by the American Minister to a committee of three, composed of himself, the Secretary of State of Liberia, and the Superintendent of Public Instruction. Your proposal was referred to the Liberian Government through the American Minister at Monrovia who, in reply, forwarded to the Department copy of a note from the Liberian Minister for Foreign Affairs suggesting certain modifications to your proposition. It appears that a copy of this despatch from the American Minister at Monrovia, with its enclosure, was transmitted to you in a letter dated May 14, 1909, which was addressed to you at 1821 Jefferson Place, but that no reply has been received to that letter.

The Department now transmits copy of a recent letter which has been received from Mr. Ernest Lyon' enclosing copy of a telegram and a letter from the General Superintendent of Public Instruction of Liberia, appointing him agent of the Department of Education of that Republic with full power to conclude all necessary arrangements with the American Colonization Society with reference to the Donovan Fund. I am [etc.]

ALVEY A. ADEE.

1 The letter of Sept. 27, 1911, printed ante.

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The President of Liberia to the Secretary of State.

[Telegram.]

MONROVIA, October 22, 1911. Consul General Lyon authorized receive Donovan fund and release Society.

PRESIDENT BARCLAY.

File No. 882.42/11.
The Consul General of Liberia to the Secretary of State.

LIBERIAN CONSULATE GENERAL,

Baltimore, August 12, 1912. Sir: At the request of the American Colonization Society, Washington, D. C., I am instructed to leave with the State Department the duplicate of documents demanded by the Society necessary for the settlement of the Donovan Fund, which is now held for Liberian public education. I have [etc.]

ERNEST Lyon.

(Inclosure.)

To all to irhom it may concern, but in particular to the Trustees of the Ameri

can Colonization Society, Washington, D. C., United States of America:

Know ye by these presents :

That, Whereas Caroline Donovan, late of the City of Baltimore, State of Maryland, in the United States of America, deceased, by her last will and testament did give and bequeath into the Republic of Liberia for the maintenance of public schools in Liberia, a legacy, the principal and interest accruing thereon amounting to the sum of sixty-five thousand five hundred and eleven dollars and eleven cents ($65,511.11) to be paid unto the said Republic of Liberia, said amount being in the hands of the American Colonization Society of Washington, D. C., United States of America, and,

Whereas, the Government of Liberia has enacted a law creating a Board of Education (a copy of which law is hereto attached),' at the head of which board is the Honourable B. W. Payne, Secretary of Public Instruction, and which board is the custodian of all public school funds.

Now therefore, know ye: That I, B. W. Payne, Secretary of Public Instruction of the Republic of Liberia, for myself and on behalf of the Board of Education, by the power vested in me by the vote of said board taken, have made, constituted and appointed, and by these presents do make, constitute and appoint the Honourable Charles B. Dunbar of the City of Monrovia, and Dr. Ernest Lyon, Consul General of the Republic of Liberia to the United States of America, our true and lawful attorneys, for me, and in behalf of the Board of Education, in our name and for our use and benefit, under the law governing the same, to ask, demand and receive of and from the American Colonization Society of Washington, D. C., United States of America, the legacy given and bequeathed unto the said Republie of Liberia by the said will of the said Caroline Donovan as aforesaid; and upon receipt thereof, or payment thereof to our attorneys, of the full amount as aforementioned with the interest accruing thereon, I do authorize them to approve the account, give the proper and full receipt and release for the money as they may see proper and fit to do so.

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Giving our said attorneys full power to do everything whatsoever requisite and necessary to be done in the premises, as fully as we could do if personally present, hereby ratifying and confirming all that our said Attorneys shall lar. fully do, or cause to be done by virtue hereof. In witness whereof I have hereunto, for myself in behalf of the Board of

Education in Liberia, set my hand and seal this 13th day of July in [SEAL.) the year of Our Lord, one thousand nine hundred and twelve, and of the Republic the sixty-fifth,

B. W. PAYNE,

Secretary of Public Instruction.
For and in behalf of the Board of Education in Liberia.

File No. 882.42/11,

The Acting Secretary of State to the President of the American

Colonization Society.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, August 20, 1912. Sir: In compliance with the request of Doctor Ernest Lyon, Liberian Consul General at Baltimore, Maryland, I am transmitting herewith certain authenticated documents which he states have been required by you as proper authority for the American Colonization Society to turn over to Mr. Charles B. Dunbar and Doctor Lyon as attorneys to receive the fund from the hands of the Society. I am [etc.]

ALVEY A. ADEE.

File No. 882.42/19.
The President of the American Colonization Society to the Secretary

of State.

WASHINGTON, October 7, 1913. SIR: I have the honor to inform you that the Donovan Trust Fund, which has been the subject of correspondence between your Department, the American Colonization Society and the Liberian Government, was satisfactorily adjusted this day, by payment in full by the Society of the sum of $65,511.11, to Consul General Lyon, who is dels authorized by the Liberian Government to receive the fund and give an acquittance to the Society. Respectfully,

H. L. E. Jonsson.

1 Inclosure to the next above.

MEXICO.

MESSAGES OF THE DE FACTO PROVISIONAL PRESIDENT, VICTO

RIANO HUERTA, READ TO THE CONGRESS APRIL 1 AND SEPTEMBER 16, 1913.

File No. 812.032/14.

The American Ambassador to the Secretary of State. No. 1916.]

AMERICAN EMBASSY,

Mexico, April 2, 1913. Sir: I have the honor to transmit herewith in duplicate the official copy of the Report of the Citizen President of the Republic to the Second Session of the 26th Congress of the United Mexican States, as well as a translation of the same in duplicate taken from the Mexican Herald of this morning. I have [etc.]

HENRY LANE WILSON.

[Inclosure-Translation-Extract pertaining to foreign relations.) Public attention has been occupied greatly by the public disorders whith hare occurred during the last six months, since they might have had influence in some manner on the cordial relations which up to date we have maintained with foreign nations.

As a matter of fact the criminal depredations committed in various parts of the Republic by armed groups which have placed themselves outside the law, committing acts now of rebellion, now of brigandage, have brought about, on the part of victims of foreign nationality, claims against the Mexican Government, directed by the representatives of their respective nations. The form in which the claims have been presented has in no wise inspired any doubt or the least fear that our relations of friendship with foreign nations could suffer any al. teration from this cause. Prudence, discretion and serenity have been characteristic of the conduct of the diplomatic agents accredited to Mexico in taking up these affairs, showing once more the esteem which their Governments and they then selves hare for our country.

The Mexican Government, anticipating the investigation ordered by the American Congress to fix and estimate the personal damages caused by the revolution of 1910 by citizens resident in El Paso, Texas, and Douglas, Arizona, ordered two of its consuls to compile with the greatest zeal the data for the appraising the real damage and to set the amounts of indemnities which should be forthcoming. The result was that only eleven persons presented claims in El Paso and six in Douglas, for injuries received, in some cases because of acts imputable to their own negligence or their impertinent curiosity to witness a battle. In equity and in view of the damages suffered, indemnities were fixed, the amounts of which were similar to those fixed by the American courts and by the Mexican and American chancelleries in cases where the damages, in part at least, are the fault of the victimus. The matter is not yet ended due to the exaggerated pretensions of those interested, who have thought to find in the commission appointed by the American Congress an unconditional support.

File No. 812.032/15.

The American Chargé d'Affaires to the Secretary of State. No. 2060.]

AMERICAN EMBASSY,

Mexico, September 17, 1913. Sir: For the information of the Department, I have the honor to transmit herewith the original text of the message read by the Prorisional President of the United Mexican States, at the opening of

Congress last night. I also transmit herewith a clipping from the
Mexican Herald of today which contains the translation thereof.
I have [etc.]

NELSON O'SHAUGHNESSY.

[Inclosure-Translation, Extract pertaining to foreign relations.] The fratricidal struggle that has been exhausting us is fortunately near its end, due to the efforts of the glorious Federal Army, any praise of which is too little. Besides this struggle the tension of our diplomatic relations with the Government of the United States of America, although fortunately not with that people, have caused us to suffer more than one disappointment that we did not merit from that source and has retarded the complete pacification of the Republic. As this matter is of such a delicate nature and as I have already informed the Permanent Committee and the whole nation of the still uninterrupted state of negotiations, I have only to add that the Government with reason expects soon to see settled the differences that today keep in suspense the friendship that unites us to that powerful and civilized neighbor.

Notwithstanding the very delicate circumstances in which the country bas been placed, and to which I will refer in the proper place, our foreign relations have not suffered, and, far from becoming strained, they have been characterized by a more cordially amicable tendency since the country began to emerge from its great revolutionary crisis.

Among the international questions awaiting settlement there are some that have arisen of late on account of the revolutionary conflict and others of an earlier date, which for various reasons had not been settled. To both, the Executive has devoted special attention, the desire being that the Department of Foreign Relations develop an activity commensurate with the urgency that exists at the present time that all questions in which friendly governments are interested be promptly despatched.

The Executive hopes that Mexico will be able to give the most solid guar. anties of its good will to the nations with which she is bound by ties of friendship and interest, and she on her side will do her best to the end that all delicate questions pending in our chancellery may soon be disposed of, while upholding, as is right, before all things, the honor and interests of the nation, in accordance with adequate precepts of international law. To this end certain projected conventions will shortly be submitted to the Senate, the general terms of which are the subject-matter of negotiations which have been initiated in a friendly spirit.

POLITICAL AFFAIRS-ASSASSINATION OF PRESIDENT MADERO

AND VICE PRESIDENT PINO SUÁREZ; SEIZURE OF THE EXECU-
TIVE POWER BY GENERAL HUERTA COOPERATING WITH GEN-
ERAL FELIX DÍAZ; DICTATORSHIP OF HUERTA; IMPRISON.
MENT OF OPPOSITION DEPUTIES AND NULLIFICATION OF
PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS; SUPPRESSION OF DÍAZ; UPRISING
OF CONSTITUTIONALISTS UNDER VENUSTIANO CARRANZA.
MEASURES TAKEN BY THE UNITED STATES ON THE BORDER
AND IN MEXICAN WATERS; MEASURES TAKEN BY THE DIPLO-

MATIC CORPS TO PROTECT THE LIVES OF FOREIGNERS."
File No. $12.00/5823.
The American Ambassador to the Secretary of State.
(Telegram-Paraphrase.)

AMERICAN EMBASSY,

Mexico, January 7, 1913—6 p. m. The substance of my analysis of the situation, made since my return,' is as follows:

I regard the whole situation as gloomy if not hopeless. Armed revolution against the Government has for the moment sensibly di

1 Continued from For. Rel. 1912, pp. 708-878. . Mr. Wilson resumed charge of the Embassy on January 5.

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