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OF THE

TWENTY-SECOND ANNUAL MEETING

OF THE

American Bar Association

HELD AT

BUFFALO, NEW YORK,

August 28, 29 and 30, 1899.

PHILADELPHIA:
DANDO PRINTING AND PUBLISHING COMPANY,
34, SOUTH THIRD STREET.

1899.

Loanpo-** OF THE
LELAND SThrowdoos, wil., UNIVERSITY

LAW DEPARTMENT.

LIBRARY OF THE
LELAND STANFORD JR. UNIVERSITY.

a.3997/

THE

TWENTY-THIRD ANNUAL MEETING

WILL BE HELD AT

SARATOGA SPRINGS, NEW YORK,

On Wednesday, Thursday and Friday,

August 29, 30 and 31, 1900.

APR 18 1900

LICHARY OF THE
LELAND STANFORD, JR., UNIVERSITY

LAW DEPARTMENT,

TRANSACTIONS

OF THE

TWENTY-SECOND ANNUAL MEETING

OF THE

American Bar Association,

HELD AT

BUFFALO, NEW YORK,

AUGUST 28, 29, AND 30, 1899.

Monday, Auyust 28, 1899. The Twenty-second Annual Meeting of the American Bar Association convened in the Common Council Chamber, in Buffalo, on Monday, August 28, 1899.1

The meeting was called to order by the former President, William Wirt Howe, of Louisiana, who introduced Charles F. Manderson, Vice-President for Nebraska, as presiding officer of the meeting in the absence of the President, Joseph H. Choate, of New York.

Charles F. Manderson, took the chair and introduced Sherman S. Rogers, of Buffalo.

Sherman S. Rogers :

Mr. President and gentlemen of the American Bar Association: The pleasant duty has been assigned me to welcome

| The Eighteenth Conference of the International Law 'Association was held at Buffalo in conjunction with the meeting of this Association. The International Law Association met on August 31 and September 1 and 2. A list of its members who were in attendance at both meetings will be found below in the List of Members Registered. Charles F. Manderson, Vice-President of the American Bar Association, was elected Honorary President of the International Law Association.

you, on behalf of the Bar of Buffalo, to this fortunate, and we hope you may find it so, this pleasant city. It is certainly fortunate in having you as its guests. We recognize that your Association, more than any other, represents to the country the profession of which we are members, and that the honorable service of the Association as well as its distinguished personnel, entitles it to speak upon the great questions of jurisprudence and legislation with which it may concern itself, with the dignity and seriousness that must attract attention and command respect.

This is fast becoming a great convention city, so to speak; doubtless because of its central location, perhaps also because -you see I go back to that—it is a pleasant place in which to sojourn in the summer season—and partly because it has a phenomenal attraction in the great cataract so near our doors. But whatever may be the attractions that bring you to us at this time, we are most grateful to you for coming.

Your presence cannot fail to stimulate among our own members the laudable pride and ambition which every worthy lawyer has a right to feel in so great a profession. It ought also in some manner to rekindle in many of us, who in the engrossing cares of business life are apt to forget that the practice of the law is something more than a means to a livelihood, a little of the glow of aspiration we felt in earlier days, when ideas were more and money less.

I observe, Mr. President and gentlemen, that this is the twenty-first year of the life of your Association; that the public may know who have been its Presidents during these years, let me name them together:

James 0. Broadhead, of Missouri.
Benjamin H. Bristow, of New York.
Edward J. Phelps, of Vermont.
Clarkson N. Potter, of New York.
Alexander R. Lawton, of Georgia.
Cortlandt Parker, of New Jersey.
John W. Stevenson, of Kentucky.

William Allen Butler, of New York.
Thomas J. Semmes, of Louisiana.
George G. Wright, of Iowa.
David Dudley Field, of New York.
Henry Hitchcock, of Missouri.
Simeon E. Baldwin, of Connecticut.
John F. Dillon, of New York.
J. Randolph Tucker, of Virginia.
Thomas M. Cooley, of Michigan.
James C. Carter, of New York.
Moorfield Storey, of Massachusetts.
James M. Woolworth, of Nebraska.
William Wirt Howe, of Louisiana.
Joseph H. Choate, of New York.

Sir, would it be possible to find twenty-one names more justly eminent in the records of any voluntary association, nay, of any Senate? With such men as leaders in this Association, the country has the assurance that here is a body which, to good government, public order, wise legislation, and the pure administration of justice, is and will continue to be a strong bulwark and support.

Again, Mr. President and gentlemen, I welcome you to our city. We are fain to believe that our Bar may not be wholly unknown to you. Certainly there has been in Buffalo, in earlier years, a Bar of which any city might be proud-some great lawyers and some great judges; many men who would have done honor to the country in any civil station. Our Bar of to-day, let me denote as distinguished for modesty—the lawyer's traditional virtue—and we trust they may add by your testimony, their hospitality.

The President:

I take pleasure in introducing Mr. Walter S. Logan, President of the New York State Bar Association.

Walter S. Logan, of New York:

Gentlemen of the American Bar Association: The New York State Bar Association does not propose to give the Buf

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