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MEMOIR OF WILLIAM WORDSWORTH

Repentance, a Pastoral Ballad

The Affliction of Margaret

PREFACE

SUPPLEMENTARY ESSAY.

The Cottager to her Infant (by a Lady)

The Sailor's Mother

POEMS REFERRING TO THE PERIOD OF CHILD-

The Childless Father

15 The Emigrant Mother

Wy heart leaps up when I behold

ib. Vaudracour and Julia

ib. The Idiot Boy

Foresight, or the Charge of a Child 10 his

Michael, a Pastoral Poem

younger Companion .

16

Tue WAGGONER, in Four Cantos

Characteristics of a Child Three Years old ib.

Address to a Child, during a boisterous Winter POEMS OF THE FANCY

Evening (by a Lady).

ib.

A Morning Exercise

The Nother's Return (by the same).

ib. To the Daisy

lucy Gray; or, Solitude

17 A whirl-blast from behind the hill

We are Seven

18

The Green Linnet

Aberdote for Fathers, showing how the Prac-

The Contrast

tice of Lying may be taught

ib.

To the Small Celandine

Rural Architecture .

19 To the same Flower

The Pet-Lamb.

ib.

The Waterfall and the Eglantine

The Idle Shepherd-Boys; or Dungeon-Ghyll

The Oak and the Broom

Force

Song for the Spinning Wheel

To H. C. six Years old

ib. The Redhreast and Butterfly

lutluence of Natural Objects

The Kitten and the Falling Leaves

The Longest Day

A Flower Garden

VESILE PIECES .

To the Daisy

ib.

To the same Flower

Extract from the Conclusion of a Poem

23

An Evening Walk, addressed to a young Lady ib.

To a Sky-lark ·

To a Sexton

128

Descriptive Sketches

The Female Vagrant

Who fancied what a pretty sight

33

Song for the Wandering Jew

MENS FOCSDED ON THE AFFECTIONS

35

The Seven Sisters

The Brothers

ib. A Fragment

Artegal and Elidure

39 The Pilgrim's Dream

The Sparrow's Nest.

41

Hint from the Mountains

xTo a Bufterfly

il. Stray Pleasures

A Farewell

il. On seeing a Needlecase in the Form of a Harp.

Stanzas ; written in my Pocket-copy of Thom-

Address to my Infant Daughter .

son's Castle of Indolence

42

Louisa

ib. POEMS OF THE IMAGINATION.

&range fits of passion I have known

ib. There was a Boy, etc.

/ she dwelt among the uptrodden ways 43

I travelled among unknown Men

ib. To the Cuckoo

Ere with cold beads of midnight dew

ib. A Night-piece

To ***

ib. Water-fowl

Tis said that some have died for love

ib.

Yew-Trees

A Complaint

View from the Top of Black Comb

To ******

il

* Nutting

How rich that forebead's calm expanse ib.

. * She was a Phantom of delight

TO ****

ib. O Nightingale! thou surely art, etc. .

Lament of Mary Queen of Scots on the eve of

Three years she grew in sun and shower.

a New Year.

45 A slumber did my spirit seal

* The Complaint of a forsaken Jadian Woman il The Horn of Egremont Castle

The Last of the Flock

46 Goody Blake and Harry Gill

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Even as a

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Page

Pago

X I wandered lonely as a Cloud

84 A volant Tribe of Bards

118

The Reverie of Poor Susan

ib.

How sweet it is, when Mother Fancy rocks

Power of Music

ib. Personal Talk

ib.

Star-gazers

85

(continued)

ib.

The Haunted Tree

ib.

(continued).

ib.

Written in March

ib.

(concluded)

ib.

X Gipsies

86 To R. B. Haydon, Esq.

ib.

Beggars

ib. From the dark chambers of dejection freed. ib.

Sequel to the Foregoing

ib. Fair Prime of life!

119

Ruth

87

I heard (alas! 't was only in a dream) ib.

Laodamia

89

Retirement

ib.

Her eyes are wild, her head is bare

91 To The Memory of Raisley Calvert

ib.

Resolution and Independence

92 Scorn not the Sonnet

ib.

The Thorn

Not Love, nor War

119

XHart-leap Well

September, 1815

ib.

Song at the Feast of Brougham Castle

November 1

ib.

Yes, it was the mountain Echo

Composed during a Storm

To a Sky-lark .

99

To a Snow-drop

il.

It is no Spirit who from Heaven hath flown ib.

Composed a few Days after the foregoing ib.

French Revolution.

ib.

The Stars are mansions built by Nature's hand ib.

Ode. The Pass of Kirkstone

ib.

To the Lady Beaumont

ib.

Evening Ode

100

To the Lady Mary Lowther

Lines

There is a pleasure in poetic pains

ib.

Peter Bell

The Shepherd, looking eastward

MISCELLANEOUS SONNETS

113

Hail, Twilight

ib.

To *****

ib. With how sad steps, 0 Moon

Nuns fret not at their convent's narrow room ib.

dragon's eye

ib.

Written in very early Youth

ib. Mark the concentred Gazels

ib.

Admonition

ib. Captivity.

il.

Beloved Vale! I said, etc.

14 Brook! whose society the Poet secks

ib.

Pelion and Ossa flourished side by side

ib.

ib.

Composed on the Panks of a Rocky Stream

There is a little unpretending Rill

ib.

Pure elernent of waters!

ib. Malham Cove

ib.

Her only Pilot the soft breeze

ib.

Gordile

ib.

The fairest, brightest hues of ether fade .

Upon the sight of a beautiful Picture

ib. The Monument commonly called Long Meg

ib.

Why, Minstrel, these untuneful murmurings. ib. and her Daughters, near the River Eden

Acrial Rock, whose solitary brow

ib. Composed after a Jouruey across the Ilamilton

To Sleep

Hills, Yorkshire

ib.

ib. These words were uttered as in pensive mood ib.

To Sleep

ib.

* Composed upon Westminster Bridge, Sept. 3,

The Wild Duck's Nest

123

ib.

1803

ib.

Written upon a Blank Leaf in The Complete

Oxford, May 30, 1820

Angler :

ib.

ib.

Oxford, May 30, 1820

To the Poet, John Dyer

ib. Recollection of the Portrait of king Henry

On the Detraction which followed the Publi-

Eighth, Trinity odge, Cambridge

ib.

cation of a certain Poem

ib. On the Death of His late Majesty

ib.

To the River Derwent

116 June, 1820

ib

Composed in one of the Valleys of Westmor-

A Parsonage, in Oxfordsbire

ib.

Jand, on Easter Sunday

ib. Composed among the Ruins of a Castle in

Grief, thou hast lost an ever-ready Friend ib.

North Wales

ib.

To S. H.

ib. To the Lady E. B. and the flou. Miss P. 124

Decay of Piety

ib. To the Torrent at the Devil's Bridge, North

Wales

Composed on the Eve of the Marriage of a

il

Friend, in thie Vale of Grasmere

il.

ib.

Though narrow be that Old Man's cares, etc.

ib.

From the Italian of Michael Angelo

Straage visitation !

From the same

When Philoctetes

ib.

While they, her Playınates once

ib.

to the Supreme licing

To the Cuckoo

ib.

Surprised by joy

The Infant 11 ---M---

Methought I saw the footsteps of a throne ib.

Weak is the will of Man

ib.

To Roiha Q-

il

It is a beauteous Evening

To*****

ib.

Where lies the Land to which you Ship must

Jo my mind's eye a Temple

ib.

Conclusion

ib.

With Ships the sea was sprinkled far and night ib. I MEMORIALS OF A TOUR IN SCOTLAND, 1803
The world is too much with us, eic.

Departure from the Vale of Grasmere

ib,

1 25

go?

128

130

.

.

wean

ib.

.

To the Sons of Burns, after visiting the Grave

of their Father

Ellen Irwin, or the Braes of Kirtle

ib.

To a Highland Girl

127

Glen Almain, or the Narrow Glen

ib.

Stepping Westward

-The Solitary Reaper

ib.

Address to Kilchurn Castle upon Loch Awe ib.

Rob Roy's Grave

129

Composed at -- Castle

Yarrow unvisited

ib.

In the Pass of Killicranky, an Invasion being

expected, October 1803

131

The Matron of Jedburgh and her Husband ib.

Fly, some kind Spirit, fly to Grasmere-dale 132

The Blind Highland Boy

ib.

Torn in 1814

134

The Brownie's Cell

ib.

Composed at Corra Linn, in sight of Wallace's

Tover

135

Effusion in the Pleasure-ground on the Banks

of the Bran, near Dunkeld

ib.

Yarrow visited

137

POEMS ON THE NAMING OF PLACES

ib.

It was an April morning, etc.

To Joanoa

138

There is an Eminence, etc.

139

À narrow girdle of rough stones and crags ib.

To M...

ib.

When to the attractions of the busy World 140

INSCRIPTIONS

In the Grounds of Coleorton, the Seat of Sir

George Beaumont, Bart., Leicestershire ib.

In a Garden of the same

ib.

Written for an Uro, placed at the Termination

of a newly-planted Avenue

ib.

For a Seat in the Groves of Coleorton

ib.

Written with a Pencil upon a Stone in the

Wall of an Out-house on the Island of Gras-

mere

ib.

Written with a Slate-pencil on a Stone on the

Side of the Mountain of Black Comb 142

Written with a Slate-pencil upon a Stone, the

largest of a leap lying near a deserted

Quarry, upon one of the Islands at Rydale ib.

INSCRIPTIONS SUPPOSED TO BE FOUND IN AND NEAR

· Hermit's Cell:

lopes what are they? etc

Jose ribed upon a Rock.

143

last thou seen with flash incessant

ib.

Near the Spring of the Hermitage

ib.

Sor seldom, clad in radiant vest

ib.

for the Spot where the Hermitage stood on

St Herbert's Island, Derwent-water

ib.

WINETS DEDICATED TO LIBERTY

1.14

composed by the Sea-side, near Calais, Aug.

1802

ib.

Calais, August, 1802

ib.

To a Friend

ib.

Imered for Bopaparte, etc.

il.

Caiais, August 13, 1802

ih.

Da the Extinction of the Venetian Republic ib.

The King of Sweden

in

Page

To Toussaint l'Ouverture

145

Driven from the soil of France, a Female

ib.

Composed in the Valley, near Dover, on the

Day of Landing

ib.

Inland, within a hollow Vale; I stood

ib.

Thought of a Briton on the Subjugation of

Switzerland

ib.

O Friend! I know not which way I must look ib.

Milton! thou shouldst be living at this hour ib.

Great Men have been among us, etc.

146

It is not to be thought of that the Flood ib.

When I have borne in memory what has

tamed

ib.

One might believe that natural miseries . 146

There is a bondage worse,

far worse, to bear. ib.

These times touch monied Worldlings with dis-

may

ib.

England! the time is come when thou shouldst

ib.

When, looking on the present face of things ib.

To the Men of Kent

147

Anticipation

ib.

Another year!- another deadly blow!

ib.

ODE

ib.

On a celebrated Event in Ancient History 148

Upon the same Event

ib.

To Thomas Clarkson, on the final passing of

the Bill for the Abolition of the Slave Trade,

March, 1807

ib.

A prophecy. February, 1807

ib.

Clouds, lingering yet

ib.

Go back to antique Ages

ib.

Composed while the Author was engaged in

writing a Tract, occasioned by the Conven-

tion of Cintra, 1808

ib.

Composed at the same time, and on the same

Occasion

149

Hoffer

ib.

Advance – come forth from thy Tyrolean

ground

ib.

Feelings of the Tyrolese

ib.

Alas! what boots the long laborious quest

ib.

And is it among rude untutored Dales

ib.

O'er the wide earth

ib.

On the final Submission of the Tyrolese. ib,

Hail, Zaragoza! etc.

150

Say, what is Honour ? etc.

il.

The martial courage of a day is vain

ib.

Brave Schill! by death delivered

ib.

Call not tbe Royal Swede unfortunate

ib.

Look now on that Adventurer

Is there a Power

ib.

Ah! where is Palafox ? etc.

ib.

In due observance of an ancient rite

151

Feelings of a noble Biscayan at one of these

Funerals

il.

'The Oak of Guernica

il.

Indignation of a high-minded Spaniard . ib.

Avaunt all specious pliancy of mind

ib.

O'erweening Statesmen have full long relied ib.

The French and the Spanish Guerillas 152

Spanish Guerillas, 1911

ib.

The power of Armies is a visible thing

ib

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Missions and Travels.

ib.

Alfred.

ib.

Ilis Descendants.

ib.

Influence abused.

ib.

Danish Conquests.

ib.

Canute.

The Norman Conquest.

ib.

The Council of Clermont.

ib.

Crusades.

ib.

Richard l..

ib.

An Interdict.

ib.

Papal abuses.

Scene in Venice.

Papal Dominion.

ib.

ib.

• 178

ib.

ib.

ib.

ib.

179

ib.

il

Part Il.-Cistertian Monastery.

Monks and Schoolmen.

Other Benefits..

--(continued).

Crusaders..

Trapsubstantiation.

Waldenses.

Archbishop Chichiely to Henry V.

Wars of York and Lancaster.

Wicliffe.

Corruptions of the higher Clergy.

Abuse of Monastic Power.

Monastic Voluptuousness.

Dissolution of the Monasteries.

The same Subject. .

(continued).

Saints.

The Virgin.

Apology.

Imaginative Regrets.

Reflections.

Translation of the Bible.

The Point at Issue.

Edward VI.

ib.

il

ib.

ib.

180

ib.

ib.

ib.

ib.

il

181
ib.
ib.

ib.

170

• 182

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The Liturgy

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• 226

Rural Ceremony
Regrets.

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THL PRIORESS'S TALE.

209
THE RIVER DCDDON; A SERIES OF SONNETS. 20
To the Rev. Dr W-

ib.
Not envying shades.
Child of the clouds !

ib.
How shall I paint thee?

ib.
Take, cradled Nursling of the mountain, ib.
Sole listener, Duddon! to the breeze that played ib.

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