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The Assembly returned the following entitled bills, with a message that they had concurred in the amendments of the Senate thereto:

"An act to incorporate the Masonic Hall Association of Watertown."

"An act appointing railroad commissioners of the town of Johnstown, and modifying their powers and duties."

Ordered, That the Clerk return said bills to the Assembly.

Mr. Nicks gave notice that he would, at an early day, ask leave to introduce a bill in relation to bridges at Corning.

Mr. Platt gave notice that he would, at an early day, ask leave to introduce a bill to authorize the town of Queensbury, in the county of Warren, to issue bonds to aid in the construction of a railroad.

Mr. White, gave notice that he would, at an early day, ask leave to introduce a bill in relation to the Syracuse, Fayetteville and Manlius Railroad Company.

Mr. Kline gave notice that he would, at an early day, ask leave to introduce a bill relative to the division of the excise moneys between the different towns in Montgomery county.

By unanimous consent, Mr. Parsons asked and obtained leare to introduce a bill entitled “An act to incorporate the Protectives of the city of Rochester,” which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on the judiciary.

By unanimous consent, Mr. Bennett asked and obtained leave to introduce a bill entitled "An act to amend section ten of title two of the revised charter of the city of Buffalo," which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on municipal affairs.

By unanimous consent, Mr. Williams asked and obtained leave to introduce a bill entitled "An act to amend chapter 600 of the Laws of 1865, passed April 28, 1865, entitled 'An act entitled an act to amend an act entitled 'An act in relation to the compensation of the several officers of State prisons,' passed April 23, 1864,” which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on State prisons.

By unanimous consent, Mr. White asked and obtained leave to introduce a bill entitled "An act to authorize the Baptist Church and Society in the town of Spafford, in the county of Onondaga, to sell certain church property," which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on the judiciary.

In pursuance of previous notice, Mr. E. Cornell asked and obtained leave to introduce a bill entitled “An act to incorporate 'The American Dividend and Transfer Company,'” which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on banks.

In pursuance of previous notice, Mr. White asked and obtained leave to introduce a bill entitled “An act in relation to evidence in criminal cases,” which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on the judiciary.

By unanimous consent, Mr. H. C. Murphy asked and obtained leave to introduce a bill entitled "An act to incorporate The New York City Depressed Railway Company,'” which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time.

Mr. H. C. Murphy moved to refer said bill to the committee of the whole.

The President put the question whether the Senate wonld agree to said motion, and it was decided in the affirmative, as follows:

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FOR THE AFFIRMATIVE. Andrews Collins

Gibson

T. Murphy White
Barnett
C. G. Cornell Kline

Nicks

Wilbor
Bennett
E. Cornell La Bau

Pierson

Wolcott
Chambers Folger
H. C. Murphy Stanford

19
FOR THE NEGATIVE.
Campbell Godard

O'Donnell Sessions Williams
Crowley Humphrey
Parsons

8 By unanimous consent, Mr. La Bau asked and obtained leave to introduce a bill entitled "An act in relation to the 55th Regiment of the State of New York,” which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on militia and public defence.

By unanimous consent, Mr. T. Murphy asked and obtained leave to introduce a bill entitled "An act to prevent the propulsion of cars by steam on the Harlem Railroad, below 80th street, in the city of New York,” which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on railroads.

By unanimous consent, Mr. Stanford asked and obtained leave to introduce a bill entitled “An act to incorporate the Merchants' Mutual Security Company,” which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on commerce and navigation.

By unanimous consent, Mr. Godard asked and obtained leave to introduce a bill entitled "An act to legalize the proceedings of the annual town meeting of the town of De Kalb, in the county of St. Lawrence, held on the 12th day of February, 1867, in relation to the appropriation and disbursement of certain surplus money which was paid over to the supervisor of said town by the late recruiting committee of said town of De Kalb," which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on the judiciary.

By unanimous consent, Mr. Crowley asked and obtained leave to introduce a bill entitled "An act to incorporate 'The Deaconess Institute of the Evangelical Lutheran Church,” which was read the first time, and by unanimous cousent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on charitable and religious societies.

The bill entitled “An act to amend the several acts in relation to Union village, in the county of Washington, and to change the name of said village to Greenwich," was read a third time.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to the final passage of said bill, and it was decided in the affirmative, a majority of all the members elected to the Senate voting in favor thereof, and three-fifths of said members being present, as follows:

FOR THE AFFIRMATIVE.
Andrews C. G. Cornell Godard

T. Murphy Sessions
Barnett
E. Cornell Humphrey Nicks

Stanford
Campbell Crowley Kline

O'Donnell Wilbor
Chambers Folger

La Bau
Parsons

Williams
Collins
Gibson

22 Ordered, That the Clerk deliver said bill to the Assembly, and request their concurrence therein.

The bill entitled "An act authorizing the construction of a railroad from the end of the long wharf on the Hudson river, in the town of Fishkill, Dutchess county, to Matteawan in said town," was read a third time.

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The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to the final passage of said bill, and it was decided in the affirmative, a majority of all the members elected to the Senate voting in favor thereof, as follows:

FOR THE AFFIRMATIVE.
Andrews C.G. Cornell La Bau

Pierson

Sutherland
Barnett
E. Cornell
T. Murphy
Platt

White
Campbell Godard

Nicks
Sessions

Wilbor
Chambers Humphrey O'Donnell Stanford Wolcott
Collins
Kline
Parsons

28 Ordered, That the Clerk deliver said bill to the Assembly, and request their concurrence therein.

The bill entitled "An act to provide for a Convention to revise and amend the Constitution," having been announced for a third reading,

On motion of Mr. Andrews and by unanimous consent, the committee of the whole was discharged from the further consideration of the Assembly bill entitled "An act to provide for a convention of the people of this State to revise and amend the Constitution," and the same ordered to a third reading.

Said bill having been announced for a third reading,

On motion of Mr. Andrews and by unanimous consent, said entitled bill was amended by striking out all after the enacting clause, and inserting the following, being the Senate bill on same subject:

Section 1. An election shall be held on the last Tuesday of April next, of delegates to meet in convention to revise the Constitution of this State and to amend the same.

$ 2. The number of delegates to be chosen to such convention shall be one hundred and thirty-seven. They shall be elected by Senatorial districts, and each Senate district shall be entitled to elect the same number of delegates to the convention as the territory of which it is composed is now entitled by law to elect to the Assembly; and no Senatorial district shall have less than four delegates, and the counties of Kings and New York shall each elect one delegate at large. Every male citizens of the age of twenty-one years, who shall have been a citizen for ten days, and an inhabitant of this State one year next preceding such election, and for the last four months a resident of the Senatorial district where he may offer his vote, shall be entitled to vote at such election in the election district in which he shall at the time be a resis dent, and not elsewhere. But no person shall vote at such election who will not take and subscribe the following oath: "I (A B) do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I have never voluntarily borne arms against the United States since I have been a citizen thereof; that I have voluntarily given no aid, countenance, counsel or encouragement to persons engaged in armed hostility thereto; that I have neither sought nor accepted, nor attempted to exercise the functions of any office whatever under any authority or pretended authority in hostility to the United States; that I have not yielded a voluntary support to any pretended government, authority, power or constitution within the United States, hostile or inimical thereto, and did not willfully desert from the military or naval service of the United States, or leave this State to avoid the draft during the late rebellion;" or who shall have been convicted of bribery, larceny or any infamous crime, nor any person who shall make or become directly or indirectly interested in any bet or wager, depending upon the result of such election. For the purpose of voting, no person shall be deemed to have gained or lost a residence by reason of his presence or absence while employed in the service of the United States; nor while engaged

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in the navigation of the waters of this State, or of the United States, or of the high seas; nor while a student of any seminary of learning; nor while kept at any almshouse, or other asylum, at public expense; nor while confined in any prison. Such election shall be by ballot. Each elector may vote on one ballot for four delegates or less. Such election shall, in all respects, be conducted as is now provided by law for elections other than for militia and town officers, so far as the existing provisions of law are applicable thereto, and not inconsistent with this act. If any person offering to vote at such election, shall be challenged in relation to his right to vote at such election, the oath prescribed by section eighteen, article second, title fourth, chapter one hundred and thirty, of the Laws of eighteen hundred and forty-two, as amended by the twelfth section of chapter two hundred and forty of the Laws of eighteen hundred and forty-seven, shall not be put to him, nor shall his vote be rejected if he refuses to take the same. The county canvassers shall meet at the place now provided by law, on the Friday next following said election, before one o'clock in the afternoon of that day, and all the provisions of law in relation to the board of county canvassers and their proceedings, shall apply to them at their said meeting. The Secretary of State shall appoint a meeting of the State canvassers, to be held at his office, on or before the first Tuesday of May next, and all provisions of law in relation to the formation and proceedings of the board of State canvassers, shall be observed in relation to the election hereby ordered and in relation to the delegates to be chosen thereat. All the provisions of chapter seven hundred and forty, of the Laws of eighteen hundred and sixty-five, entitled "An act to ascertain by proper proof the citizens who shall be entitled to the right of suffrage," and all the provisions of chapter eight hundred and twelve of the Laws of eighteen bundred and sixty-six, amendatory and supplementary thereof, and all the provisions of chapter three hundred and eighty of the Laws of eighteen hundred and fifty-nine, entitled "An act for ascertaining by proper proofs the citizens who shall be entitled to the right of suffrage, and to prevent fraudulent voting," so far as the provisions of the last named act are not affected by the provisions of said chapters seven hundred and forty and eight hundred and twelve, shall be observed in and as to the election herein provided for, except as limited or affected by this act. But the officers charged by said acts, chapters seven hundred and forty and eight hundred and twelve, with the making of the registry there provided for, shall meet on the nineteenth day of April next, at the hours of the day ard at the places provided by law, and shall not continue in session longer thar: one day, unless in their opinion it is necessary for the completion of the said registry to meet the next day, in which case they may adjourn to next day, on which day they shall sit and complete their registry. In making up their registry, they shall take the registry made for the general election of the year eighteen hundred and sixtysix, which shall be the registry for the election herein provided for, with such alterations and no other as shall be needed by the death or change of residence of any citizen, or by his loss of the right to vote for any reason, or by his acquiring the right to vote at the said election by the provisions of this act, or otherwise. The electors of any district may elect as a delegate any citizen of this State, whether resident of said district or not.

§ 3. The delegates so chosen shall meet in convention in the Assembly chamber at the Capitol, in the city of Albany, on the first Tuesday in June next, at eleven o'clock in the forenoon. They shall, by ballot, elect one of their number president, and may appoint in manner as they

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see fit, one secretary, who may appoint two assistants. The president of the convention may appoint not exceeding six door-keepers and ten messengers. The convention may elect a stenographer, and fix the amount of his compensation; also a sergeant-at-arms and one assistant. The delegates to the convention shall be entitled to the sum of six dollars per day, for every day, from the first day to the last day of the session thereof, and the same mileage as is now paid to the members of the Legislature. The secretary shall receive twelve dollars per day and his assistants ten dollars per day and mileage, as aforesaid; and the doorkeepers and messengers, sergeant-at-arms and assistant, shall receive the same compensation as is provided by law for similar services and attendance upon the Assembly. The amount of pay shall be certified by the president of the convention, and shall be paid by the Treasurer of the State, on the warrant of the Comptroller, in the same manner as members of the Legislature are paid. It shall be the duty of the Secretary of State to attend said convention at the opening thereof, and to call the roll thereof, and to preside at all meetings thereof, until a president thereof has been elected and bas taken his seat. But the Secretary of State shall have neither the casting vote nor any other vote therein, and all public officers shall furnish such convention with all such papers, statements, books, or other public documents in their possession, as the said convention shall order or require for its use, from time to time, while in session; and it shall be the duty of the Comptroller to furnish the members thereof with stationery to the amount provided by law for the Legislature while in session, and to the convention, such stationery and file boards and other like things, as are furnished to the two houses of the Legislature.

$ 4. A journal of the proceedings of the said convention shall be kept, and shall, at the final adjournment thereof, be filed in the office of the Secretary of State, and the amendments to the present constitution, or the constitution agreed to by the said convention, shall be recorded in his office.

$ 5. The said amendments or constitution shall be submitted by the convention to the people, for their adoption or rejection, at the next general election, to be held on the first Tuesday of November next, and every person hereby entitled to vote for delegates may, at that election, vote thereon, in the election district in which he shall then reside, and not elsewhere. And inspectors of registry and of elections, in making up their register of electors for said general election, as provided by chapter seven hundred and forty of the Laws of eighteen hundred and sixty-five, and chapter eight hundred and twelve of the Laws of eighteen hundred and sixty-six, shall make therein an additional and a separate alphabetical list of the persons who, in addition to the persons who have the right to vote by the Constitution of this State, are entitled to vote in accordance with the provisions of this act, upon the said adoption or rejection. And all the provisions of the said acts in relation to the making of said registers shall apply to the making of said additional and separate alphabetical list. The said amendments or the said constitution shall be voted upon as a whole, or in such separate propositions as the convention shall deem practicable, and as the convention shall by resolution declare. In either case the convention shall prescribe the form of the ballot, the publication of the amendments or of the constitution, and the notice to be given of the election. In case the said amendments or parts of the said constitution shall be voted upon separately, every person entitled to vote thereon may vote for or against any one or more of them. At the election mentioned in this section, the inspectors in every elec: :

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