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THE

COMMON SCHOOL MANUAL:

COM

A

REGULAR AND CONNECTED COURSE

OF

ELEMENTARY STUDIES,

EMBRACING THE NECESSARY AND USEFUL BRANCHES OF A

COMMON EDUCATION,

IN FOUR PARTS:

COMPILED FROM THE LATEST AND MOST APPROVED

AUTHORS,

BY M. R. BARTLETT.

PART III.

UTICA:

PUBLISHED FOR THE AUTHOR,
BY WILLIAM WILLIMAS:

HARVARD COLLEGE LIBRARY
GIFT OF

EDWARD PERCIVAL MERRITT
MAY 21, 1925

Northern District of New-York, to wit:

BE IT REMEMBERED, That on the fifth day of May, in the fifty-first year of the Independence of the United States of America, A. D. 1827, Montgomery R. Bartlett of the said district, hath deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof he claims as author in the words following, to wit:

"The Common School Manual; a regular and connected course of Elementary Studies, embracing the necessary and useful branches of a commmon education, in four parts. Compiled from the latest and most approved authors: By M. R. BARTLETT.”

In conformity to the act of the Congress of the United States, entitled "An act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of Maps, Charts, and Books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies, during the times there. in mentioned;" and also, to the act entitled 'An act supplementary to an act entitled 'An act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of Maps, Charts, and Books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies during the time therein mentioned,' and extending the benefits thereof to the arts of Designing Engraving, and Etching historical and other prints."

RICHARD R. LANSING, Clerk of the District Court of the United States, for the Northern District of New-York.

A

COMMON SCHOOL MANUAL.

SPELLING LESSON 1.

Easy words of three syllables, accent on the 1st, vowels shori,

tăn tă mount
tăr′ ră găn
vǎg' ǎ bond
běl' lu ine
biz ẳn tine

děr ō-gäte

děs' ig näte děs' pē rāte ĕl' è gǎnt ĕmā nāte ĕm' è răld

fed' ĕr ǎl

fĕr ū lă

hěl' le bōre
pěr fō rāte
pĕr mă něnt
per'-pe-trate
răng ū lăn
reg' ū late

rěl' ē gâte
rěl' ē vǎnt
rĕm' ō ră

ăď jū tănt ǎg' gran dize ǎgō nize

ănă grăm ăn nữ ăl

CHAPTER 28.

ăn nữ lăr

ăn nū lét

ăn tế past ǎr' rō gâte ǎs' të risk grăd'-ū-āl grăd' ū äte grăn'-ü-läte

lăt' ĕr ăl mặn-u-ăl pǎn'-to-mine păr'-a-site săn he drim

sǎs'-să-frăs ştăm'-in-ǎ

tǎb' ū lăr tăn tă lize

sěr pěn tine

sĕr rǎ tūre
těg' ū měnt

těm pō rǎl
těné měnt

ter mă gănt
těs' tǎ měnt
věn ĕr äte
věr bĕr äte
dis' pŭ tǎnt
dis' sō lūte

fil' ǎ měnt

im' mō lāte

im' pē tus
im' plē ment
in' dū răte
in' făn tile
• în' făn tine

in' no vāte

in' stru ment
in' të grǎl
in' tĕr ěst

in' tĕr im
in' tĕr lūde
in' ter văl
riv' ū lět

1

sig' nǎl ize
signā tūre
sil' lǎ bùb
stig' mă tize
trig 6 năl
bot' ăn ist

glob' ū lăr
ob' ĕ lisk
ob so lete
propā gāte
mus. sul măn
sub' ǎl těrn
sub' jū gāte
sub' til ize

sup' plē ment

tur bū lent
tur pen tine

READING.LESSON 2.

Application of the Inflections of the voice to the series.

NOTE. The series implies that succession of similar portions, or single particulars, which, whether simple or compound, double or treble, or whatever other variety they may assume, frequently occur in almost all kinds of written language. The series may be divided into three kinds : The simple series; the compound series; and the series of serieses.

THE SIMPLE SERIES, consists of two or more single particulars follow

ing each other in succession:-and they may commence the sentence, or close it.

RULE 1. When two single particulars occur, in commencing a sentence, the first takes the falling inflection, and the second the rising. Thus:-

The teacher and his pupils' apply the inflections.
Precept and example', have their proper influence'.
Exercise and temperance', improve the constitution'.

OBS. When two single particulars occur in closing a sentence, the first tokes the RISING inflection, and the second, the FALLING. Thus:

The inflections are properly applied by the teacher' and his pupils'.

Washington devoted his life to the cause of virtue' and his country'.

An indifferent constitution may be improved by exercise and temperance'.

RULE 2. When three single words form the commencing series, then the first and and second adopt the falling, and the third the rising inflection. Thus:-

Washington's head`, heart`, and hands', were employed for the glory of his country'.

The Persians, Greeks`, and Romans', were idolatrous nations'.

Her wit', beauty`, and fortune', raised her above the level of her acquaintance'.

OBS. When three single words form the closing series, the first and third take the FALLING, and the second the RISING inflection. Thus:

The essence of true piety', consists in humility`, love', and devotion'.

He who resigns the world', has no temptation to hatred, malice', or revenge'.

The whole life of the Christian', should be marked with love', sobriety', and equity`.

ARITHMETIC.

Interest.--Lesson 3.

Interest is an allowance made by the borrower to the lender for the use of money or other property. It has reference to four particulars; to wit:--The principal, time, rate pr. ct. pr. ann, and amount.

The principal is the sum for which interest is computed. The time, is the period for which it is computed. The rate

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pr. ct. pr. ann. is the sum allowed for the use of $100, or £100 for one year. And the amount, is the principal and interest added.

Interest is of two kinds, simple and compound.

SIMPLE INTEREST.

Simple Interest is that which accrues on the principal only for a given time.

CASE 1. When the given time is one year.

Rule. Multiply the Principal by the rate per cent. and divide the Product by 100, the Quotient will be the answer.― Thus:

(1) What is the Interest of $500 for 1 year, at 7 per cent? $500X7=3500-100-$35;-Answer.

(2) What is the Interest of $225 for 1 year at 7 per cent? Ans. $15.75

OBS. Problems of this nature may be solved by Simple Proportion.
Thus:--As $100: $7:: 225: $15.75.
(3) What is the Interest of $524 for 1

(4) What is the Interest of $842 for 1

year, at 6 per cent?
Ans. $31.44
year, at 5 per
Ans. $42.10.

cent?

GRAMMAR.

Syntax.Lesson 4.

NOTE. Syntax refers to the arrangement and agreement of the words employed in the construction of a sentence.

In grammatical construction, sentences are of two kinds; to wit:-Simple and Compound.

A simple sentence has one subject and one finite verb; as, Mary reads.

A compound sentence is composed of two or more simple sentences, joined by one or more connective words; as, Mary reads and Jane writes.

The principal parts of a simple sentence, are the subject and the verb:-all words combined with these may be called modifying words; they are in fact mere adjuncts. Thus:--Mary walks very frequently. Jane reads in a depressed tone. He rides over a rough road twice a week. The boys love to play at foot-ball on the green once a day.

A 2

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