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MRS. MEDILL MCCORMICK

MRS. C. W. McNAUGHTON
MRS. ANTOINETTE FUNK

MISS JANET RICHARDS
MRS. CLARA BEWICK COLBY MRS. HELEN H. GARDNER
HON. FRANK W. MONDELL

MRS. A. M. DODGE
MRS. GLENDOWER EVANS

MRS. HENRY WHITE
MRS. CRYSTAL EASTMAN BENE- MISS ALICE HILL CHITTENDEN
DICT

MISS MARJORIE DORMAN
MRS. MARY BEARD

MRS. O. D. OLIPHANT
DR. CORA SMITH KING

MISS MINNIE BRONSON
MRS. WILLIAM KENT

MR. JOHN MATTHEWS
HON. JOSEPH R. KNOWLAND HON. J. THOMAS HEFLIN
MRS. DONALD HOOKER

MR. JOHN R. DOS PASSOS
MRS. FRANCES DILOPOULO

DR. MARY E. WALKER

MARCH 3, 1914

WASHINGTON
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE

1914

COMMITTEE ON THE JUDICIARY.

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

SIXTY-THIRD CONGRESS.

HENRY D. CLAYTON, Alabama, Chairman. EDWIN Y. WEBB, North Carolina,

JOHN F. CAREW, New York. CHARLES C. CARLIN, Virginia.

JOHN B. PETERSON, Indiana. JOHN C. FLOYD, Arkansas.

JOHN J. MITCHELL, Massachusetts. ROBERT Y. THOMAS, JR., Kentucky.

ANDREW J. VOLSTEAD, Minnesota. H. GARLAND DUPRÉ, Louisiana.

JOHN M. NELSON, Wisconsin. WALTER I. MCCOY, New Jersey.

DICK T. MORGAN, Oklahoma. DANIEL J. MCGILLICUDDY, Maine. HENRY.G. DANFORTH, New York. JACK BEALL, Texas.

LEONIDAS C. DYER, Missouri. JOSEPH TAGGART, Kansas.

GEORGE S. GRAHAM, Pennsylvania. LOUIS FITZHENRY, Illinois.

WALTER M. CHANDLER, New York. J. J. SPEIGHT, Clerk.

WOMAN SUFFRAGE.

SERIAL 11, Part 1.

COMMITTEE ON THE JUDICIARY,

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,

Washington, D. C., March 3, 1914. The committee met at 10 o'clock a. m.

Present: Representatives Clayton (chairman), Webb, Carlin, Floyd, Dupré, McCoy, McGillicuddy, Beall, Taggart, Fitz Henry, Mitchell, Volstead, Nelson, Morgan, Danforth, Dyer, and Chandler.

The CHAIRMAN. Gentlemen of the committee, this is the day that has been fixed by the committee for a hearing on House joint resolution No. 1. Before the hearing begins I want to say that the committee has agreed that 4 hours and 20 minutes shall be accorded to the hearing to-day, 1 hour to be allotted to the Federal Woman's Equality Association, and 1 hour to the National Woman Suffrage Association, and then 2 hours to those opposed to the resolution.

I might say in this connection that there are other resolutions before the committee, all pertaining to the same subject, in addition to House joint resolution No. 1, by Mr. Mondell. There is a House joint resolution by Mr. Taylor of Colorado, which also will be considered to-day; a House joint resolution by Mr. Lafferty; House joint resolution No. 31 by Mr. Raker; House joint resolution No. 70 by Mr. Hayden; all relating to the same subject.

[H. J. Res. 1, Sixty-third Congress, first session.] JOINT RESOLUTION Proposing an amendment to the Constitution of the United States,

extending the right of suffrage to women. Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled (two-thirds of each House concurring therein), That the following article be proposed to the legislatures of the several States as an amendment to the Constitution of the United States, which, when ratified by three-fourths of said legislatures, shall be valid as part of said Constitution, namely:

"ARTICLE -SECTION 1. The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.

“ SEC. 2. Congress shall have power, by appropriate legislation, to enforce the provisions of this article."

[H. J. Res. 3, Sixty-third Congress, first session.] JOINT RESOLUTION Proposing an amendment to the Constitution of the United States,

extending the right of suffrage to women,

Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled (two-thirds of each IIouse concurring therein), That the following article be proposed to the legislatures of the several States as an amendment to the Constitution of the United States, which, when ratified by three-fourths of said legislatures, shall be valid as part of said Constitution, namely:

"ARTICLE XV.-SECTION 1. The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex, race, color, or previous condition of servitude.

“ŞEC. 2. That Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.”

[H. J. Res. 25, Sixty-third Congress, first session.]

JOINT RESOLUTION Proposing an amendment to the Constitution of the United States

giving women the right to vote.

Resolved by the Senate and IIouse of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled (two-thirds of each House concurring therein), That in lieu of the fifteenth amendment to the Constitution of the United States, the following article be proposed as an amendment to said Constitution, which, when ratified by the legislatures of three-fourths of the States, shall be valid to all intents and purposes as a part of the Constitution :

"ARTICLE XI. “ SECTION 1. The right citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude, and this right shall be extended equally to men and women.

“ SEC. 2. That Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation."

[H. J. Res. 31, Sixty-third Congress, first session.] JOINT RESOLUTION Proposing an amendment to the Constitution of the United States

extending the right of suffrage to women. Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled (two-thirds of each House concurring therein), The the following article is proposed as an amendment to the Constitution of the United States, which, when ratified by the legislatures of three-fourths of the States, shall be valid to all intents and purposes as a part of the Constitution :

"ARTICLE XVIII. “SECTION 1. The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State thereof on account of sex.

“ SEC. 2. Congress shall have power, by appropriate legislation, to enforce the provisions of this article."

(H. J. Res. 70, Sixty-third Congress, first session.)

JOINT RESOLUTION Proposing an amendment to the Constitution of the United States

extending the right of suffrage to women.

Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled (two-thirds of each House concurring therein), That the following article be proposed to the legislatures of the several States as an amendment to the Constitution of the United States, which, when ratified by three-fourths of the said legislatures, shall be valid as part of said Constitution, namely:

"ARTICLE —

“ SECTION 1. The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.

“SEC. 2. Congress shall have power, by appropriate legislation, to enforce the provisions of this article."

The CHAIRMAN. We shall be very glad to hear Mrs. McCormick.

STATEMENT OF MRS. MEDILL M'CORMICK, OF CHICAGO, ILL..

CONGRESSIONAL CHAIRMAN NATIONAL AMERICAN WOMAN'S SUFFRAGE ASSOCIATION.

Mrs. McCORMICK. I should like simply to ask the privilege of correcting the chairman's statement with regard to the division of time. The first hour belongs to the National American Woman's Suffrage Association, the second to the Federal Woman's Equality Association, and the third hour to the Congressional Union for Woman Suffrage. As some of our speakers for this morning have been storm stayed we shall only present one speaker in our time, and I take great pleasure in introducing Mrs. Antoinette Funk, a member of our congressional committee, who will make our argument.

STATEMENT OF MRS. ANTIONETTE FUNK, CHICAGO, ILL., REPRE

SENTING THE NATIONAL AMERICAN WOMAN'S SUFFRAGE ASSOCIATION

Mrs. FUNK. Mr. Chairman and gentlemen of the Judiciary Committee, ours is the oldest national suffrage association in the United States. It has been in existence for something over 50 years, and comprises a membership of 462,000 enrolled women in the nonsuffrage States. In addition to these, gentlemen, I speak this morning in behalf of the 4,000,000 women voters in 10 different suffrage States in the Union.

I am not going to take the time of this committee in stating the reasons why women should vote. I take it that you have had those arguments presented to you, not only as members of this committee, but as men of understanding and intelligence in your various communities many times. I want to talk to you briefly upon our business in Washington; why we are here; and what we really hope to accomplish. I want to say to you that we have come to Washington, not for the purpose of propaganda work, not in order that the suffrage agitation may be carried on in the National Capital, but we have come earnestly asking you for legislation in our behalf.

You have had a number of resolutions, you have had a number of bills presented for your consideration, and I earnestly beg your con· sideration and action upon joint resolution No. 1 granting full suf

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