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2.

The Census and Vote of 1852; the Vote of 1856 and Returns of the Superintendent of Public Instruction of the Children of the State for 1856.

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73 Trinity

1,764 1,741 23 1,491 1,469 2,081 no ret'n. Tulare

8,575 142
32 125 107 410

88 Tuolumne

17,657 15,967 958 6,904 5,672 6,104 1,145

1,307 1,085 189 1,016 750 1,266 379 Yuba....

22,005 16,666
633 15,245 4.268

5,184 854 Totals...

264,435 176,81022,193 115,000! 76,189 110,221 29,628 (a) Organized 1853, from Contra Costa and Santa (f) Organized 1854, from Butte. Clara.

(g) Organized 1850, from Los Angeles. (6) Organized 1854, from Calaveras.

(h) Organized 1856, from San Francisco. (c) Organized 1856, from Mariposa.

(i) Organized 1854, from Tuolumne. (d) Organized 1853, from Trinity,

(1) Organized 1856, from Colusa, Butte and (e) Organized 1855, from Mariposa.

Shasta. The enumeration of the County of El Dorado was not completed within the time provided by law, for taking the Census of the State for 1852. The figures included above, are believed to be a fair approximation to the actual resident population of that year, and were taken as a basis by the Legislature, in regulating the Apportionment Act of 1853. mode of arriving at an approximation of the population of California, may not be regarded as a fair and reliable one, from the fact that there are not a proportional number of females and children among its residents as there are in the Eastern States. This is undoubtedly true, but will not the great excess of the foreign and Indian population of the State more than make up the difference ?

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Alabama..

41,879 117,549 253,532 342,844 Arkansas

1,617 4,576 19,935 47,100 California. Connecticut. 2,759 951 310

97
25

17 Delaware.

8,887

6,153 4,177 4,509 3,292 2,605 2,290 Florida

15,501

25,717 39,310 Georgia.

29,264
105,218 149,656

217,531 280,944 381,682 Illinois.

168

917 747 331 Indiana.

::
135 237

190
3

3

16 Kentucky

40,343 80,561 126,732 165,213 182,258 210,981 Louisiana

34,660 69,064 109,588 168,452 244,809 Maine.

2 Maryland

103,036
105,635 111,502

107,397! 102,994 89,737! 90,368 Massachusetts..

1 Michigan.

24

32 Mississippi

3,489 17,088 32,814 65,659 195,211 309,878 Missouri

3,011 10,222 25,0911 58,240 87,422 New Hampshire.

158
8

3

1 New Jersey.

11,423 12,422 10,851 *7,557 2,254 674 +236 New York .. 21,324 20,343 15,017 10,088 75

4 North Carolina.. 100,572 133,296 168,824 205,017 245, 601 245,817

288,548 Ohio.

6

3 Pennsylvania

795
211
403

64 Rhode Island

5 South Carolina.

952
381

48
17

107,094

146, 151 196,365 258, 4751 315,401 327,038 384,984 Tennessee.

3,417 13,584 44,535 80, 107 141,603 183,059 239, 459 Texas...

58,161 Vermont

17 Virginia

293,427
392,518 425,153

469,757 449,087 472,528 Wisconsin

11 District of Columbia,

5,395 *6,377

* 6,119

4,694 3,687 Totals.

697.897 893,041 1,191,364 1,538,038 2,009,043 2,487,455 3,204,287 * For estimated population, 1848, see page 114. + No slaves returned in the Territories of Minnesota, New Mexico and Oregon; Utah 26 are returned. * Apprentices by the State Act to abolish slavery, of April 18, 1846.

345,796

3,244

5. NUMBER OF PASSENGERS
Which arrived at the Port of San Francisco, from 1849 to 1857.

1850.

1851.

1852.

1856.

MONTHS. 1849.

1853. 1854.* 1855.

1857. January

2,455 1,131 3,204 3,472 1,878 889 3,407 1,435 February.

2.581 798 4,609 2,603 4,222 1,058, 1,240 976 March

2.508 1,304 4,528 4,431, 5,390 2,526 3,057 2,650 A pri). 8,362' 4,595 2,986 7,928 3,904 5,486 2,378 1,678 2,443 May. 5,1751 4,904 4,503 8,889 4.207 5,664 4,546 2,500 2,945 June

7,888 6,468 2,895 9,711 3,174 5,097 2,109 4,878 1,668 July. 7,996 3,484 2,159 10,572 1,404 5,070 3,085 2.820 3,743 August 8,790 3,369 2,813 6,632 1,364 5,528 1,617 1,003 1,741 September.. 16,131 1,941 1,382 2,741 1,050 2,978 2,865 1,249 8341 October ....13,037/ 1,405 1,970 3,029 2,880 3,189 4,053 1,185 1,124 November.. 10,862 1,556 2,620 2,471 2,199 1,131 2,681 2,282 1,625 December .. 13,164 1,196 2.621 2,674 2,545 1,898! 1,391 2,820 1,806

Totals.... 91,405|36,462 27,182166,988 33,233 47,531 29,198 28,11922,990 Total arrivals from April, 1849, to December, 1857, 383,108.

6. COMPARATIVE VIEW Of the Arrivals and Departurest at the Port of San Francisco, from January

1852, to December 31, 1867.

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Totals...

228,059 139,002 89,957 Of the arrivals 1857–4,272 were women and 1,685 children. Of the departures—1,164 were women and 814 children. Of the arrivals 1857– 17,596 were from Panama, and of the departures—13,357 were for that port. For the six months ending June 30, 1858, the number of women that have arrived at this port, 2,931; children, 762. Departures same period, women, 899; children, 496.

* The overland immigration to California in 1584 was estimated at 61,462.--Message of Gov. Bigler, 1855.

+ The estimated number of overland immigration for 1857, is 12,500.

# There is no record of the departures made at the Custom House, San Francisco. The number here estimated is compiled from the San Francisco Prices Current. The number of departures, by sea and land, for the Pacific British Possessions, during the present year and up to the 15th August, is estimated at 30,000; the number of arrivals from thence during the same period is 4,050 ; excess of departures, 25,950. The excess arrivals from other countries for the same period is about 15,000; making a net loss to the population of the State, since January, 1858, of nearly 15,000. No account is taken in this estimate of the eastern overland immigration of the present year, variously estimated at from 5,000 to 8,000. From these figures it will be seen that there is scarcely a doubt that, with the returning wave of the Frazer River excitement, the population of the State will, at the close of the present year, exhibit a healthy increase over that of 1857.-[ED.

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1. STATE SCHOOL LANDS, REVENUES, ETC. Liberal measures have been adopted for the education of the youth of California,

The 500,000 acres of public lands donated to each State on admission into the Union, for purposes of internal improvement, were wisely dedicated by our State Constitution to the use of the schools.

By Act of the Legislature, approved May 3d, 1852, provision was made for the sale of these lands at the rate of two dollars per acre, payable either in coin, State Scrip, Controller's Warrants upon the General Fund, or Bonds of the Civil Debt of the State.

The proceeds of these sales were converted into Bonds of the Civil Funded Debt of the State bearing seven per cent. interest per annum.

The Legislature, by Act approved April 23d, 1858, provided for the selection of the unsold portion of the School Lands and reduced the price to $1 25 per acre, payable in cash. When the amount received from sales reaches $10,000, it is to be invested in State Bonds, to be placed as before to the credit of the School Fund. All interest falling due on these Bonds is semi-avnually placed to the credit of the School Fund. On the 1st of January, 1858, 237,440 of the 500,000 acres of school lands had been sold, yielding $474,880—the annual interest of which, at seven per cent., amounts to $33,241 60. In addition to this source of revenue, it is provided that one-fourth of the money paid into the State Treasury for polltaxes, shall be placed in the Common School Fund and distributed semi-annually to the various counties in the same manner as the interest arising from the sale of School Land Warrants.

* Including orphan asylums and primary schools under the patronage of the Church. + The estimated Catholic population in the State. # The estimated value of church property, exclusive of the Missions.

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1856, the receipts into the Treasury from poll-taxes, amounted to $63,533 92, one-fourth of which, $15,883 48, was therefore placed to the credit of the School Fund. For the fiscal year ending June 30, 1857, the proceeds of the poll-tax paid into the Treasury amounted to $61,802 42, of which $15,450 60 went to the Schools. From July 1st, 1857, to June 30th, 1858, the receipts into the State Treasury from the same source, amounted to $81,872 43, the School Fund's proportion of which would be $20,468 11.

In additiou to these sources of revenue there is another resource, merely nominal, however, as experience has shown. It is provided by Acts of April 30th, 1855, and April 19th, 56, that the proceeds of the sales of all escheated estates shall be placed to the credit of the School Fund, but as no such estates have yet been recovered, the provision is practically worthless.

2. UNIVERSITY LANDS. Congress has donated to California seventy-two sections, amounting to 46,080 acres, for the establishment and support of a State University. The Act of April 23, 1858, provides for the selection and sale of these lands at $1 25 per acre, payable in cash. At the expiration of one year from the passage of the Act, the sum of $57,600 is to be taken from any moneys belonging to the School Fund and invested in State Bonds, to be kept as a special deposit, marked "Seminary Fund."

All interest paid into the Treasury on these Seminary Bonds is in like manner to be invested in State Bonds.

In his last annual report to the Legislature, the Superintendent of Public Instruction earnestly advocates the adoption of immediate measures for the establishment of the University, and at great length argues the advantages of the military system, after the plan of West Point.

The idea was received with much favor throughout the State, and the Legislature so far indorsed it as to memorialize Congress to grant to California the Monterey Redoubt for the purposes of a Military Academy.

3. TOWNSHIP SCHOOL LANDS. Congress has also donated to California the sixteenth and thirty-sixth sections (1,280 acres) in every township of six miles square, for the use of the Schools. It is estimated that the State is entitled to very nearly 6,000,000 acres of land under this law-a magnificent fund, if properly managed, for the support of schools and colleges, throughout all time to come.

The last Legislature, by Act approved April 26, 1858, provided for the

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