United States Naval Institute Proceedings, Том 10,Издања 1-3

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United States Naval Institute, 1884

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Discussion of ChiefEngineer Bakers Paper
71
Deep Sea Sounding By Lieut Com T F Jewell U S N
77
The Employment of Torpedoes in Steam Launches against MenofWar
79
A Brief Account of the Progress of the Art of Navigation By Lieut
95
The Training Ship Minnesota By Lieut B Noyes U S N
99
The Belleville Boiler Report of the Board of Inspection on the Steam
103
The Armament of our Ships of War By Captain W N Jeffers U S N
105
The Type of I Armored
109
The Barometer in High Southern Latitudes By Commander Norman
113
The Autobiography of Commodore Charles Morris U S N
115
Scandinavian Experiments with Submarine Mines Translated from
121
The Isthmus of Darien and the Valley of the Atrato considered with
123
On a Proposed Type of Cruiser for the United States Navy By Lieut
127
Bibliographic Notices
139
Subject of the First Prize Essay 1879 Naval Education I Officers
141
Discussion of Lieut Collinss Paper 179
149
The Monitor and the Merrimac By Commodore Foxhall A Parker
155
Naval Affairs By Lieut Fred Collins U S N
159
Our Fleet Manæuvres in the Bay of Florida and the Navy of the Future
163
A Proposed Armament for the Navy By Commodore E Simpson
165
Discussion of Commodore Parkers Paper
177
The Navigation of the China Seas By Lieut Zera L Tanner U S N
181
The Use of Steam in the Manufacture of Gunpowder
187
Bibliographic Notices
196
RearAdmiral John Rodgers U S N
197
Notes on NitroGlycerine By Professor Charles E Munroe U S N A 5
203
The Employment of Boat Guns as Light Artillery for Landing Parties
207
The Marine Ram as designed by RearAdmiral Daniel Ammen U S
209
The Valuation of Coal By Professor Charles E Munroe U S N A
221
Revolving Storms or how the Wind blows within the Stormdisk
231
The Gulf Stream New Data from the Investigations of the U S Coast
233
Reviews 695
236
The Ventilation of Ships By P A Engr G W Baird U S N
237
How may the Sphere of Usefulness of Naval Officers be extended
241
Officers of the Institute
244
Three Letters concerning a Disputed Fact
300
List of Members who have joined since last Report
302
77
305
List of New Members
312
Prize Essay 1879 Naval Education By Lieut Com A D Brown
313
On the Length of a Nautical Mile By J E Hilgard Superintendent
317
Bibliographic Notices 703
321
Naval Education By Lieut Com C F Goodrich U S N
323
Reviews
329
Books Received
339
Naval Education By Commander A T Mahan U S N
345
93
369
Discussion of the Prize Essay on Naval Education
377
A UBow Section and a Long Buttock Line By Lieutenant Seaton
387
The Fryer Buoyant Propeller By Lieutenant W H Jaques U S N
401
The Physalia or Portuguese ManofWar By Midshipman W E Saf
413
the Cruise of the U S Ship Cyane during
419
The Environment of the Man of the Sea By Medical Inspector B
430
Notes on the Literature of Explosives By Professor Charles E Munroe
439
The United States Ship Trenton By Passed Assistant Engineer George
443
Uses of Astronomy By RearAdmiral John Rodgers U S N Superin
449
The War in South America By Lieut J F Meigs U S N
461
their Cause By CivilEngineer U S G White U S N
467
III
469
Discussion
473
Torpedoes Their Disposition and Radius of Destructive Effect
479
Discussion Boston Branch
483
Fleets of the World By Captain S B Luce U S N
487
Longitudinal and Hoop Tensions in a Thick Hollow Cylinder By Lieu
489
An Instrument for Solving Spherical Triangles By Rev Thomas Hill
493
Professional Notes
495
The U S S Alarm By Lieut R M G Brown U S N
499
Reviews
505
Books Received
522
VOLUME VIII No 4 Whole No 22 1882

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