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ments of grammar and arithmetic; and, during the 'examination, to keep the class attentive, in order and in activity without undue noise.

At the end of the third year, pupil teachers will be examined by the Inspector :

1. In the composition of the notes of a lesson on a subject selected by the Inspector.

2. In the elements of mechanics,* or in book-keeping. 3. In syntax, etymology, and prosody.*

4. In the geography of the four* quarters of the globe. Girls in the geography of the British Empire.

5. In the outlines of English history.

6. More fully in the Holy Scriptures, Liturgy, and Catechism, in Church of England schools, the parochial clergyman assisting in the examination,

7. In their skill in managing and examining the second class in grammar, geography, and mental arithmetic.

8. The girls should have acquired greater skill as teachers of sewing, knitting, &c.

At the end of the fourth year, pupil teachers will be examined by the Inspector :

1. In the composition of an account of the organization of the school, and of the methods of instruction used.

2. In the first steps in mensuration,* with practical illustrations; and in the elements of land surveying* and levelling. *

3. In syntax, etymology, and prosody.*

4. In the *geography of Great Britain as connected with the outlines of English history. Girls in the geography of the four quarters of the globe.

5. More fully in the Holy Scriptures, Liturgy, and Catechism, in Church of England schools, the parochial clergyman assisting in the examination.

6. In their skill in managing and examining the first class in grammar, geography, and mental arithmetic, and in giving* a lesson to two or three classes grouped together,

At the end of the fifth year, pupil teachers will be examined by the Inspector :

1. In the composition of an essay on some subject connected with the art of teaching.

2. In the rudiments of algebra,* or the practice of land survey. ing* and levelling. *

3. In syntax, etymology, and prosody.

4. In the use* of the globes, or in the geography of the British empire* and Europe, * as connected with the outlines of English history. In this year girls may be examined in the historical geography of Great Britain.

5. More completely in the Holy Scriptures, Liturgy, and Cate

ting, &c.

chism, in Church of England schools, the parochial clergyman assisting in the examination.

6. In their ability to give a gallery lesson, and to conduct the instruction of the first class in any subject selected by the Inspector.

General Rules.- In the subjects marked with an asterisk girls need not be examined, but in every year they will be expected to show increased skill as sempstresses, and teachers of sewing, knit

In the examinations the Inspectors will, in each year, observe the degree of attention paid by the pupil teachers to a perfect articulation in reading, and to a right modulation of the voice in teaching a class. A knowledge of vocal music and of drawing (especially from models), though not absolutely required, because the means of teaching it may not exist in every school, will be much encouraged. Every pupil teacher will be required to be clean in person and dress.

The number of pupil teachers apprenticed in any school will not exceed one to every twenty-five scholars ordinarily attending.

Certificate.-- Every pupil teacher who has passed all the foregoing examinations, and has presented the required testimonials in each year, will be entitled io a certificate declaring that he has successfully completed his apprenticeship.

Stipendiary Monitors.The Inspectors may, for some time, find in the rural districts schools, in which all the general conditions required for the apprenticeship of a pupil teacher may be satisfied, but the master or mistress of which may be unable to conduct an apprentice even through the foregoing course of instruction. Their Lordships being desirous so to adapt their regulations to the condition of such schools, as by their improvement to enable them hereafter to provide for the training of pupil teachers, are disposed for a few years to encourage the managers to retain their monitors, by small stipends, to the age of seventeen, without apprenticeship, but under a form of agreement with the parents, on condition that the master give each monitor extra daily instruction.

For such an arrangement all the general rules and preliminary conditions previously enumerated will be required, and the following qualifications for candidates for such stipends :

Stipendiary MonitorsQualifications of Candidates. The candidates must be thirteen years of age, and they will be required

1. To read with fluency. 2. To write a neat hand.

3. To write from dietation sums in the first four simple rules of arithmetic, and to work them correctly.

4. To point out the parts of speech in a simple sentence.

5. In Church of England schools, to repeat the Catechism, and show a knowledge of its meaning, the parochial clergyman assisting in the religious examination.

In other schools, the managers will certify that they are satisfied with the state of their religious knowledge.

6. Girls to sew neatly and to knit.

Qualifications of Stipendiary Monitors in each Year. The stipendiary monitors will be examined at the end of each year of service, and will be required

At the end of the first year,--
1. To read with fluency, ease, and expression.

2. To write in a neat hand, with correct spelling and punctua. tion, a simple prose narrative, slowly read to them.

3. To write from dictation sums in the first four compound rules of arithmetic, to work them correctly, and to know the tables of weights and measures.

4. To point out the parts of speech in a simple sentence, and to give the rules of its construction.

5. To have an elementary knowledge of geography,

6. In Church of England schools, to show a general acquaintance with the Scriptures; the parochial clergyman, in this and the succeeding years, assisting in the religious examination.

In other schools, the managers will certify, in this and succeeding years that the religious knowledge of the stipendiary monitors is satisfactory to them.

7. In schools where vocal music is taught, he should have commenced instruction from notes, and should give proof of improvement in each succeeding year.

8. Girls to teach sewing and knitting in this and succeeding years.

At the end of the second year,

1. To write from memory, with correct spelling and punctuation, the substance of a simple prose narrative, read carefully to them two or three times.

2. In arithmetic, to write from dictation sums in Practice, and to work them correctly.

3. In grammar, to parse more difficult sentences, and give the rules of their construction.

4. To know the geography of Great Britain and Palestine.

5. In Church of England schools, to give illustrations of the Catechism from the Bible, and to show a more complete acquaintance with the Scriptures.

6. To give a class a reading-lesson, and examine it on the meaning of what has been read.

7. Girls to be able to cut out clothes.

At the end of the third year,

1. To write from memory the substance of a longer and more difficult prose narrative, and to show greater skill in composition.

2. In arithmetic, to write from dictation sums in Simple Proportion and Simple Interest, and to work them correctly.

3. In grammar, to be able to parse sentences, with a thorough knowledge of the rules of syntax.

4. To know the geography of Great Britain, Europe, and Palestine, and that of the outlines of the four quarters of the globe.

5. In Church of England schools, to possess a more extensive knowledge of the Holy Scriptures, and of the Liturgy and Catechism.

6. To examine a class in the rudiments of grammar, geography, and arithmetic.

At the end of the fourth year,

1. To prepare the notes of an oral lesson on a subject selected by the Inspector.

2. To work correctly sums in decimal arithmetic, and to show an acquaintance with the simple rules of mental arithmetic.

3. In grammar, to be examined in etymology.

4. To know the geography of the four quarters of the world, and especially of the British Empire.

5. To have a general knowledge of the outlines of English history.

6. In Church of England schools, to show a more perfect knowledge of the Holy Scriptures, Catechism, and Liturgy.

7. To examine the first or second class in grammar, geography, and arithmetic, and to give it an oral lesson, keeping the class attentive, in order, and in activity, without undue noise. Certificates of Character and Conduct to be annually required from

Pupil Teachers and Stipendiary Monitors. At the close of each year, pupil teachers or stipendiary monitors will be required to present certificates of good conduct from the managers of the school, and of punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to their duties from the inaster or mistress.

In Church of England schools, the parochial clergyman, and in other schools, the managers, will also certify that the pupil teachers or stipendiary monitors have been attentive to their reli

gious duties.

Salaries of Pupil Teachers and Stipendiary Monitors. If these certificates be presented, and if the Inspector certily, at the close of each year, that he is satisfied with the oral examination and the examination papers of the pupil teachers or stipendiary monitors, and if those papers be satisfactory to their Lordships, the following stipends will be paid, irrespectively of any sum that may be received from the school or from any other source:-

For a Pupil
Teacher.

For a Stipendiary

Monitor.

£. $.

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10 0 12 10 15 0 17 10 20 0

5 0 7 10 10 0 12 10 0 0

Remuneration and Duties of Schoolmasters and Mistresses. At the close of each of these years, if the pupil teachers have received a certificate of good character and of satisfactory progress, the master or mistress by whom they have been instructed and trained shall be paid the sum of 51. for one, of 91. for two, of 121. for three pupil teachers, and 31. per annum more for every additional apprentice; and, on the like conditions, 21. 10s. for one stipendiary monitor, 41. for two, 61. for three, and 17. 10s. in addition in each year for every additional stipendiary monitor.

In addition to the foregoing subjects of instruction, if the pupil teachers be skilfully trained by the master in the culture of a garden, or in some mechanical arts suitable to a school of industry, or the female pupil teachers be instructed by the mistress in cutting out clothes, and in cooking, baking, or washing, as well as in the more usual arts of sewing and knitting, and the Inspector certify that the pupil teachers are thereby in a satisfactory course of training for the management of a school of industry, the master or mistress will receive an additional gratuity, proportioned to the degree of skill and care displayed.

In consideration of the foregoing gratuity, and of the assistance obtained from the pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in the instruction and management of the school, the master will give them instruction in the prescribed subjects, during one hour and a half at least, during five days in the week, either before or after the usual hours of school-keeping.

The stipends will be liable to be withdrawn by their Lordships on the report of their Inspector, on proof of the continued ill health of the pupil teachers or stipendiary monitors, or of misconduct, want of punctuality, diligence, or skill, or failure in their examination, or in default of the required certificates.

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