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In the latter part of the work, the author has collected a great amount of valuable information, tending to illustrate the practicability of the plan. He has done the church a rich service in giving this information order and permanence. We commend it to the attention of all who love the cause of missions.

Our readers will already have satisfied themselves in regard to the estimate we would put upon the work. We deem it a timely publication, and one which will do much to further the good work of missions. It savors, however, a little of ultraism, to borrow language from the author. Its views are a little extravagant. The title of the work,—“A new order of Missionaries,"—is calculated, indeed, to draw attention. Yet we have been unable to see its appropriateness. All that is valuable in the work, in regard to the practical conduct of missions, has been long known and long acted upon. The author has struck out no new path. The American Board, in the employment of such men as Dr. Bradley, Dr. Dodge, Dr. Parker, and others, has carried into practice all that is really valuable or promising of success in the author's new plan. Yet he has done a good service to missions, in giving greater prominence to this particular feature of the missionary work. He has advanced many valuable suggestions, and embodied numerous useful and interesting facts, in the development and illustration of his views. The work is loosely put together, but evinces a truly missionary spirit, much observation and reflection.

The attentive perusal of this volume has suggested some thoughts, with the bare intimation of which we shall close.

1. We have been led to admire the wisdom manifested in the present missionary organizations. Time and experience have led to no fundamental change in the system of effort. Its basis is so broad, so firm, that it will receive and adequately support every new practical measure which the providence of God may suggest. It is such as leads to the discovery of every new source of aid. It is capable of adapting itself to every change of circumstances. Let the directors of our missionary operations but keep their eyes ever open to the wants of the cause ; let them, with a prudent sagacity, adopt readily every new suggestion which experience may offer, so far as it promises good; let them learn meekly and readily of the providence of God, and their blessed work will commend itself more and more to the favorable regards and to the warm affections of every true disciple of Christ. Neither friend nor foe will find aught but the imperfection of human nature to censure in their proceedings, or discover aught which they might improve.

2. We have been more deeply impressed with the importance of urging christianity upon the heathen more by addresses to the outward senses, and by appeals, both direct and indirect, to the feelings, and less by skillful assaults upon the intellect. Cultivated intellect is indispensable to the thoroughly qualified missionary. If he cannot contend successfully against the refined infidel

, the artful priest, the subtle devotee of a false philosophy, he must feel himself at a sad disadvantage even in his endeavors upon an ignorant populace. Certainly to succeed in silencing those who sway the common mind, must give him more confidence in himself and his cause, and gain for him power over others. But while he has cultivated, disciplined intellect, he must rely mainly upon the power which practical christianity will give him over the hearts of the heathen. The mass of the people will be unable or unwilling to grasp christianity as a science or a philosophy. They are, indeed, incapable of feeling the force of the simplest and strongest argumentation. Their understandings are blinded. The feelings are less benumbed. They can be touched by the sight of goodness. Kindness, sympathy, and generosity, will reach a chord in their bosom not entirely unstrung. Self-denying beneficence cannot but excite their attention and gain their favor. It is through the outward visible conduct alone, that the principles of the gospel can be conveyed to their hearts. Hence the importance of the grand suggestion in the work under consideration,-of preaching the gospel by healing the sick. Here, in this respect of power over disease, science, the fruit of christianity, places the gospel missionary high above the pagan practitioner. Benevolence, acting in this form, more effectually, perhaps, than in any other, commands the reverence and the love of the human heart. The physician, the world over, is reverenced and beloved, and especially so in uncivilized nations. There, his power is higher than that of any other profession, station, or office; and it is well deserving of inquiry, whether our missionary boards might not carry out still farther the principle which they have already, with such sagacity, adopted, and send forth a still larger proportion of medical missionaries.

But it must not be forgotten, that healing the sick is not the only form of benevolence by which christianity may reach the heathen mind. It is a defect in the work under notice, that it exalts this particular kind of benevolent effort so much, that all others are lost from view. Benevolence has as many modes of expression as man has variety of necessities. Sympathy in suffering, relief of temporal wants, provisions for the general comfort of others, exhibitions of self-denial, and sacrifices for their good, are modifications of benevolence, as real and genuine, if not as effective, as curing diseases. No one need esteem himself fatally crippled, in regard to missionary effort, because he has no skill to heal diseases. It is probable, that benevolence expressed in the form of providing for the education of children in Ceylon, has done more than any thing else could, to gain favor for the gospel with the heathen there. The great qualification of the christian missionary is a readiness to sympathize with the joys and sorrows of others, and a corresponding readiness to increase their joy and relieve their distress. It is by learning to feel for the bodily woes of others, that we learn to feel for their spiritual maladies. The same general principle is applicable here, which lies at the bottom of the inquiry, “He that loveth not his brother whom he hath seen, how can he love God whom he hath not seen ?" If visible distress stir no compassion, how can unseen though spiritual misery move sympathy?

3. We have been more deeply convinced of the absolute necessity of taking measures to perpetuate the christian religion wherever it is once introduced. The true principle, the only efficacious principle, in the conduct of missions, is to make sure of every conquest. If the missionary to the heathen simply preaches the gospel from place to place, without taking pains to establish churches and religious institutions, or making provision for the permanent maintenance of a salutary religious influence, the world can never be converted to Christ. The work of evangelizing the heathen will need to be done over again, with every successive generation. Doubtless a missionary like Schwartz may effect much, with the blessing of God, in the conversion of individual souls; but he will accomplish little towards bringing on the glorious day when the whole world shall be filled with the knowledge of the glory of God, unless he provide for the permanent establishment of christianity. Our Savior saw this necessity when he gave his last great command to his disciples, bidding them not only to disciple all nations, but also to baptize them, or in other words, bring them under the influence of the permanent institutions of the gospel. So the apostles conducted. They were careful everywhere to establish churches, to organize them under suitable officers, to visit and confirm them, and to address them with letters of instruction and encouragement. Mere itinerancy will not effect this. Doubtless there must be, like the Seventy, those that will go before and prepare the way, act as explorers and pioneers.

But they must, in all their movements, have regard to those who come after them to set up and maintain the permanent institutions of religion. With them they must be closely connected. There should be no independence in this respect. Wherever christianity, through their instrumentality, shall have gained a foothold, all proper means should be employed to guard, sustain, and extend it. And here lies the proper sphere of civilization. Civilization is the handmaid of religion. It is appointed of God as the support and bulwark of religion. We do not say, except it be in the order of nature simply, first christianize, then civilize. For christianity is connected with civilization, as the rising sun with the illumination of the earth. But we say, let all those acts, customs, and habits, which christianity naturally produces, and by which it is beautified and fortified, let all these be introduced cotemporaneously with the gospel. For why should not science, the foster-child of religion, be made subservient to its progress? Who ordained science and art, and wherefore ? Was it not, that they might be employed as instrumentalities in advancing the cause of religion? What missions have been most prospered,—those in which schools have been founded, and education has been pursued, where the arts of civilized life have been introduced, as the spread of christianity opened the way, or those where little or nothing of this has been attempted? We have said, that the proper province of civilization is to fortify and support an already planted christianity. We would carefully guard against the impression, that we would not justify a resort to any of the means which civilized life provides, if not discordant with the will of God, for gaining favor in behalf of religion. For why should he whom religion has civilized, become a barbarian, in order to spread that very religion which, in its lawful workings, has made him what he is? If he did not appear and act like a civilized being, how could he, indeed, fully and correctly exhibit the power of the gospel, in its legitimate effects ?

4. Any thing that will relieve the church at large of a sense of their responsibility to propagate the gospel is deeply to be deprecated. There may be seasons when christian sagacity should be tasked to lighten the burden of supporting the work of missions. All missionary undertakings should be conducted, as they, indeed, for the most part are, with rigid economy. Peculiar circumstances may warrant, may require individuals to go out, depending on their own resources. Yet it is the assigned duty of the church at large, to evangelize the world. It is essential to its advancement in holiness. It is its richest privVOL. X.

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fort of others, exhibitions of self-denial, and sacrifices for their temas good, are modifications of benevolence, as real and genuine, if and the not as effective, as curing diseases. No one need esteem himne plizi self fatally crippled, in regard to missionary effort, because he is should has no skill to heal diseases. It is probable, that benevolence metr, d expressed in the form of providing for the education of children elen in Ceylon, has done more than any thing else could, to gain favor for the gospel with the heathen there. The great qualifi-zon ist cation of the christian missionary is a readiness to sympathize yaraent a with the joys and sorrows of others, and a corresponding readiate orde ness to increase their joy and relieve their distress. It is by in chris learning to feel for the bodily woes of others, that we learn to

can with feel for their spiritual maladies. The same general principle is applicable here, which lies at the bottom of the inquiry, " He that loveth not his brother whom he hath seen, how can he love God whom he hath not seen ?" If visible distress stir no compassion, how can unseen though spiritual misery move sympa seninle ya thy?

3. We have been more deeply convinced of the absolute necessity of taking measures to perpetuate the christian religion wherever it is once introduced. The true principle, the only efficacious principle, in the conduct of missions, is to make sure of every conquest. If the missionary to the heathen simply

rede preaches the gospel from place to place, without taking pains to establish churches and religious institutions, or making provision for the permanent maintenance of a salutary religious influence, the world can never be converted to Christ. The work of evangelizing the heathen will need to be done over again, with every successive generation. Doubtless a missionary like Schwartz may effect much, with the blessing of God, in the conversion of individual souls; but he will accomplish little towards bringing on the glorious day when the whole world shall be filled with the knowledge of the glory of God, unless he provide for the permanent establishment of christianity. Our Savior saw this necessity when he gave his last great command to his disciples, bidding them not only to disciple all nations, but also to baptize them, or in other words, bring them under the influence of the permanent institutions of the gospel. So the apostles conducted. They were careful everywhere to establish churches, to organize them under suitable officers, to visit and confirm them, and to address them with letters of instruction and encouragement. Mere itinerancy will not effect this. Doubtless there must be, like the Seventy, those that will go before and prepare the way, act as explorers and pioneers.

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