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must be forwarded to the paymaster of the vessel or station to which the men are sent, together with a descriptive list of the men sent, according to the form here annexed :

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FORM OF LETTER OF INSTRUCTION TO PRIZE MASTERS.

U. S. S.

Off

186 .

SIR:

Proceed with the under your charge to the port of and there deliver her, together with the accompanying papers (which are all that were found on board) and the persons retained as witnesses, to the judge of the U. S. District Court, or to the U. S. prize commissioners at that place, taking his or their receipt for the same. You will not deliver either her, the papers, or the witnesses, to the order of any other person or parties unless directed to act otherwise by the navy department or flag-officer commanding the squadron. The

was seized by this vessel, under my command, on the day of 186 off this port, for violating the rules governing the blockade at present instituted by the United States; and of the circumstances attending the case you are sufficiently aware, and will communicate them when required to do so by competent authority.

On your arrival at and immediately after you have visited the judge or prize commissioners, you will call upon the U. S. district attorney thereat, show him these instructions, and give him any information concerning the seizure he may solicit. Then you will next report yourself, in person, to the commanding officer of the navy yard thereat, show him also these instructions, and ask his directions, when needed, as to the disposition of yourself and the rest constituting the prize crew. Finally, when duly notified by the judge, prizo commissioners, or district attorney, that your services are no longer wanted by the court, you will at once return to your vessel, taking with you the men under your cominand and the receipt above alluded to, unless otherwise ordered by superior authority.

You will receive herewith a communication for the secretary of the navy, giving him a detailed account of the prize. This you will mail immediately on your arrival at

Your attention is called to the annexed “Circular," lately issued from the navy depart. ment, to which have been added, since it was issued, the words, in the last paragraph, beginning with together with a descriptive list,” &c.; which you will see is complied with, in every particular, before sailing with your prize. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

Commanding U. S. S. To

No. IX.

PROCLAMATION FOR EMANCIPATION

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

I, ABRAHAM LINCOLN, President of the United States of America, and Commander-inChief of the Army and Navy thereof, do hereby proclaim and declare, that hereafter, as heretofore, the war will be prosecuted for the object of practically restoring the constitutional relation between the United States and the people thereof in which states that relation is or may be suspended or disturbed; that it is my purpose, upon the next meeting of Congress, to again recommend the adoption of a practical measure tendering pecuniary aid to the free acceptance or rejection of all the slave states so called, the people whereof may not then be in rebellion against the United States, and which states may tien have voluntarily adopted, or thereafter may voluntarily adopt, the immediate or gradual abolishment of slavery within their respective limits; and that the efforts to colonize persons of African descent with their consent, upon this continent or elsewhere, with the previously obtained consent of the governments existing there, will be continued.

That on the first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand tight hundred and sixty-three, all persons held as slaves within any state or any designated part of a state, the people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United States, shall be then, thence forward, and forever, free; and the executive government of the United States, including the military and naval authority thereof, will recognize and maintain the freedom of such persons, and will do no act or acts to repress such persons, or any of them, in any cfforts they may make for their actual freedom.

That the Executive will, on the first day of January aforesaid, by proclamation, designate the states and parts of states, if any, in which the people thereof, respectively, shall then be in rebellion against the United States; and the fact that any state, or the people thereof, shall on that day be in good faith represented in the Congress of the United States by members chosen thereto at elections, wherein a majority of the qualified voters of such state shall have participated, shall, in the absence of strong countervailing testimony, be deemed conclusive evidence that such state and the people thereof have not been in rebellion against the United States,

That attention is hereby called to an act of Congress entitled "An act to make an additional article of war," approved March 13th, 1862, and which act is in the words and figures following:

“Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That hereafter the following shall be promulgated as an additional article of war for the government of the army of the United States, and shall be obeyed and observed as such.

" ARTICLE. All officers or persons in the military or naval service of the I'nited States are prohibited from employing any of the forces under their respective commands for the purpose of returning fugitives from service or labor who may have escaped from any person to whom such service or labor is claimed to be due, and any officer who shall be found guilty by a court-martial of violating this article shall be dismissed from the service.

SECTION 2. And be it further enacted, that this act shall take effect from and after its passage.”

Also to the ninth and tenth sections of an act entitled “ An act to suppress insurrection, to punish treason and rebellion, to seize and confiscate property of rebels, and for other purposes," approved July 17th, 1862, and which sections are in the words and figures following:

“Sec. 9. And be it further enacted, that all slaves of persons who shall hereafter be engaged in rebellion against the government of the United States, or who shall, in any way, give aid or comfort thereto, escaping from such persons and taking refuge within the lines of the army; and all slaves captured from such persons or deserted by them and coming under the control of the government of the United States, and all slaves of such persons found in (or being within) any place occupied by rebel forces and afterward occupied by the

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forces of the United States, shall be deemed captures of war, and shall be forever free of their servitude and not again held as slaves.

“Sec. 10. And be it further enacted, That no slave escaping into any state territory, or the District of Columbia, from any of the states, shall be delivered up, or in any way impeded or hindered of his liberty, except for crime or some offence against the laws, unless the person claiming said fugitive shall first make oath that the person to whom the labor or service of such fugitive is alleged to be due, is his lawful owner, and has not been in arms against the United States in the present rebellion, nor in any way given ail and comfort thereto; and no person engaged in the military or naval service of the United States shall, under any pretence whatever, assume to decide on the validity of the ciaim of any person to the service or labor of any other person, or surrender up any such person to the claimant, on pain of being dis.nissed from the service."

And I do hereby enjoin upon and order all persons engaged in the military and naval service of the United States, to observe, obey, and enforce, within their respective spheres of service, the act and sections above recited.

And the Executive will in due time recommend that all citizens vi tne United States who shall have remained loyal thereto throughout the rebellion, shall (upon the restoration of the constitutional relation between the United States and their respective states and people, if the relation shall have been suspended or disturbed) be compensated for all losses by acts of the United States, including the loss of slaves.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand, and caused the scal of the United States to be affixed.

Done at the city of Washington, this twenty-second day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-two, and of the Independence of the United States the eighty-seventh.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN. By the President.

WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Secretary of States

THE PROCLAMATION OF EMANCIPATION.

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. -A PROCLAMATION.

WHEREAS, on the twenty-second day of September, in the year

of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-two, a proclamation was issued by the President of the United States, containing among other things the following, to wit:

“ That on the first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, all persons held as slaves within any state, or designated part of a state, the people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United States, shall be thenceforward and FOREVER FREE, and the executive government of the United States, including the military and naval authority thereof, will recognize and maintain the freedom of such persons, and will do no act or acts to repress such persons, or any of them, in any efforts they inay make for their actual freedom.

“That the Executive will, on the first day of January aforesaid, by proclamation, designate the states and parts of states, if any, in which the people thereof respectively shall then be in rebellion against the United States; and the fact that any state, or the people thereof, shall, on that day, be in good faith represented in the Congress of the United States, by members chosen thereto at elections wherein a majority of the qualified voters of such state shall have participated, shall, in the absence of strong countervailing testimony, be deemed conclusive evidence that such state, and the people thereof, are not then in rebellion against the United States.”

Now, therefore, I, ABRAHAM LINCOLN, President of the United States, by virtue of the power in me vested as commander-in-chief of the army and navy of the United States, in time of actual armed rebellion against the authority and government of the United States, and as a fit and necessary war measure for suppressing said rebellion, do, on this first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, and in accordance with my purpose so to do, publicly proclaimed for the full period of one hundred days from the day first above mentioned, order and designate as the states and parts of states wherein the people thereof, respectively, are this day in rebellion against the United States, the following, to wit: Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana (except the parishes of St. Bernard, Plaquemines, Jefferson, St. John, St. Charles, St. James, Ascension, Assumption, Terre Bonne, Lafourche, St. Marie, St. Martin, and Orleans, including the city of New Orleans), Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia (except the forty-eight counties designated as West Virginia, and also the counties of Berkeley, Accomac, Northampton, Elizabeth City, York, Princess Ann, and Norfolk, including the cities of Norfolk and Portsmouth), and which excepted parts are, for the present, left precisely as if this proclamation were not issued.

And by virtue of the power and for the purpose aforesaid, I do order and declare that ALL PERSONS HELD AS SLAVES, within said designated states and parts of states, ARE, AND HENCEFORWARD SHALL BE, FREE! and that the executive government of the United States, including the military and naval authorities thereof, will recognize and maintain the freedom of said persons.

And I hereby enjoin upon the people so declared to be free, to abstain from all violence, unless in necessary self-defence; and I recommend to them that in all cases, when allowed, they labor faithfully for reasonable wages.

And I further declare and make known, that such persons, of suitable condition, will be received into the armed service of the United States, to garrison forts, positions, stations, and other places, and to man vessels of all sorts in said service.

And, upon this act, sincerely believed to be an act of justice, warranted by the Constitution, upon military necessity, I invoke the considerate judgment of mankind, and the gracious favor of Almighty God.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand, and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.

Done at the city of Washington, this first day of January, in

the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and (L. s.] sixty-three, and of the independence of the United States of America the eighty-seventh.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN. By the President—WILLIAM H. SEWARD,

Secretary of State.

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