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NEW ENCYCLOPÆDIA;

OR,

UNIVERSAL DICTIONARY

OF

ARTS AND SCIENCES.

IN WHICH

The different Sciences and Arts are digested into the Form of distinct Treatises or Systems ¿

Including the

LATEST DISCOVERIES AND IMPROVEMENTS;

WITH THE NATURAL, CIVIL, MILITARY, AND COMMERCIAL HISTORY, AND BIOGRAPHY OF EMINENT MEN,

OF ALL NATIONS;

A DESCRIPTION OF

ALL THE COUNTRIES, CITIES, SEAS, RIVERS, &c. OF THE KNOWN WORLD.

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COMPILED FROM EVERY SOURCE OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN LITERATURE; AND ILLUSTRATED WITH
UPWARDS OF THREE HUNDRED AND FORTY PLATES,

AND A COMPLETE AND ACCURATE ATLAS.

IN TWENTY THREE VOLUMES.

VOL. XI.

LONDON:

PRINTED FOR VERNOR, HOOD, AND SHARPE, 31, POULTRY;

AND THOMAS OSTELL, AVE MARIA LANE.

R. Morison, Printer, Perth.

AN

1 5 MAI 1968

ENCYCLOPÆDIA PERTHENSIS.

(1.)

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TION, H was used by the ancients to denote bores bonorum; and H. S. corruptly for LLS. fefterce; and HA. for Hadrianus. III. As a NUMERAL, H denotes 200; and with a dafh over it, 200,000.

Is in English, as in other languages, by trong emiffion of the breath, without any conformation of the organs of speech, and is therefre by many grammarians accounted no letter. The bin English is fcarcely ever mute at the be-, Ring of a word, or where it immediately preredes a vowel as house, bebaviour: where it is fed by a confonant it has no found, accorng to the prefent pronunciation: but anciently, now in Scotland, it made the fyllable guttural; as, rant, bought.

leat in our

is ufed, 1. as a letter; 2. as an abbreviato; and, 3. as a numeral. I. As a LETTER, H the 8th in our alphabet, and the 6th confonant. Nothing can be more ridiculous than to difpute berga diftinct found, (See § 1.) and formed in a particular manner by the organs of fpeech, at language: witnefs the words all and bail, eat and beat, arm and harm, ear and hear, at and bar, &c. as pronounced with or without theb. It is pronounced by a strong exfpiration of the breath between the lips, clofing, as it were, and the tongue nearly approaching the palate. It byale motion of the lower jaw to the upper,

ems to be agreed, that our H, which is the fame wth that of the Romans, derived its figure from the Hebrew. The Phoenicians, and moft anent Greeks and Romans, ufed the fame figure

par H, which in the feries of all thefe alpha

HA. interje&. [ba, Latin.] 1. An expreffion of wonder, surprise, fudden question, or fudden exertion.

You fhall look fairer ere I give or hazard: What fays the golden chest ? ha! let me see.

Shak.

Ha! what art thou! thou horrid headlefs trunk!

It is my Haftings! Rowe's Jane Shore. 2. An expreffion of laughter. Ufed with reduplication. He faith among the trumpets ka, ba, and he fmelleth the battle afar off. Fob xxxix. 25.

Ha, ha, 'tis what fo long I with'd and vow'd; Our plots and delusions

Have wrought fuch confufions,

That the monarch's a glave to the crown, Dryd. HAA, an ifle on the N. coaft of Scotland, 34 miles SE. of Farout Head.

(1.) HAAG, or HAG, a town of Germany, in Bavaria, feated on a hill, on the W. fide of the Inn. Lon. 12. 23. E. Lat. 48. 16. N.

(2, 3.) HAAG, 2 towns of Auftria; 1. ten miles SE. of Ens: 2. eight m. WNW. of Schwanftadt. (1.)* HAAK. n. f. A fish. Ainsworth.

(2.) HAAK. See GADUS, N° 6; and HAKE, 2. HAANO, one of the HAPAEE Ilands difcover

ed by Capt. Cook, in 1777, in the S. Pacific Q. cean. Lon. 185. 43. E. Lat. 19. 41. S.

(1.) HAARBURG, a town and fort of Lunen. burg Zell, feated on the Seeve, 7 miles S. of Hamburg. It was taken by the French, and retaken by the Hanoverians in 1757. Lon. 27. 21, E. of Ferro. Lat. 53. 33. N.

bets keeps its primitive place, being the 8th letter; tho' the afterwards occupied its place in The Greek alphabet, and its form was changed to X;wnie its former figure, H, was ufed for the letter Eta, or long e. (See E.) H fubjoined , fometimes gives it the guttural found, as in fometimes the found of /b, as in Charlotte; be more frequently that of th, as in charity, chit at, church, &c. and not feldom that of k, as in rader, Achilles, &c. though the latter and all other Greek proper names ought rather to have be guttural found, agreeably to their original ters the found of these letters; giving the forpronunciation, H, fubjoined to p and t, alfo al- of Hainm. the latter that of the Greek e, as in theology, truth, the found of f, as in philofophy, &c. and de, and in fome English words, as the, that, thefe, &c. a ftit harder found. II. As an ABBREVIA

VOL. XI. PART 1.

(2.) HAARBURG, a town of Suabia. HAAREN, 2 towns of in lia; 1. three miles NE. of Buren: 2. two miles E.

HAARKIRCHEN, a town of Germany, in Auftria, 3 miles N. of Efferding.

HABAKKUK, (papan, Heb. i. e. a one of the 12 leffer prophets, whofe prophecies

are taken into the canon of the Old Testament. A There

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