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(2) Nothing in this section shall affect the liability of the trustees of a trade union to be sued in the events provided for by the Trades Union Act, 1871, section nine ("), except in respect of any tortious act committed by or on behalf of the union in contemplation or in furtherance of a trade dispute.

5.-(1) This act may be cited as the Trade Disputes Act, 1906, and the Trade Union Acts, 1871 and 1876, and this act may be cited together as the Trade Union Acts, 1871 to 1906.

(2) In this act the expression “trade union has the same meaning as in the Trade Union Acts, 1871 and 1876 (O), and shall include any combination as therein defined, notwithstanding that such combination may be the branch of a trade union.

(3) In this act and in the Conspiracy and Protection of Property Act, 1875, the expression “trade dispute” means any dispute between employers and workmen, or between workmen and workmen, which is connected with the employment or nonemployment or the terms of the employment, or with the conditions of labor, of any person, and the expression“ workmen ” means all persons employed in trade or industry, whether or not in the employment of the employer with whom a trade dispute arises; and, in section three of the lastmentioned act, the words “between employers and workmen " shall be repealed.

& Section 9 of the Trade Union Act, 1871, here referred to, reads as follows:

The trustees of any trade union registered under this act, or any other officer of such trade union who may be authorized so to do by the rules thereof, are hereby empowered to bring or defend, or cause to be brought or defended, any action, suit, prosecution or complaint in any court of law or equity touching or concerning the property, right, or claim to property of the trade union; and shall and may, in all cases concerning the real or personal property of such trade union, sue and be sued, plead and be impleaded, in any court of law or equity, in their proper names, without other description than the title of their office; and no such action, suit, prosecution, or complaint shall be discontinued or shall abate by the death or removal from office of such persons or any of them, but the same shall and may be proceeded in by their successor or successors as if such death, resignation, or removal had not taken place: and such successors shall pay or receive the like costs as if the action, suit, prosecution, or complaint had been commenced in their names for the benefit of or to be reimbursed from the funds of such trade union, and the summons to be issued to such trustee or other officer may be served by leaving the same at the registered office of the trade union.

o The expression “ trade union” is defined by the Trade I'nion Acts, 1871 and 1876, as follows:

The term “ trade union” means any combination, whether temporary or permanent, for regulating the relations between workmen and masters, or between workmen and workmen, or between masters and masters, or for imposing restrictive conditions on the conduct of any trade or business, whether such combination would or would not, if the principal act had not been passed, have been deemed to have been an unlawful combination by reason of some one or more of its purposes being in restraint of trade:

Provided, That this act shall not affect-
1. Any agreement between partners as to their own business;

2. Any agreement between an employer and those employed by him as to such employment;

3. Any agreement in consideration of the sale of the good will of a business or of introduction in any profession, trade, or handicraft.

THE CANNING INDUSTRY.-The information relating to this industry is presented, by counties, in two tables. In the first table is shown for 1905 the number of plants reporting, time in operation, number of men, women, and children employed, hours worked per day, and amount paid in wages during the year to each class of wageworkers; also the number of men and women employed on salary, together with the total amount paid each class during the year. The second table is a list of graded hourly rates showing that paid in each of the different occupations of the industry, hours worked per day and per week, and changes in the rates paid during 1905.

MAINE.

Twentieth Annual Report of the Bureau of Industrial and Labor

Statistics for the State of Maine. 1906. Samuel W. Matthews, Commissioner. 2.21 pp.

In this report the subjects following are presented: Factories, mills, and shops built during 1906, 5 pages; labor unions, 71 pages; Stockton Harbor, Maine's new seaport, 17 pages; manufacturing industries, 18 pages; the Haskell silk mill, 4 pages; the paper-box industry, 3 pages; the pulp and paper industry, 69 pages; railroads, 5 pages; report of the inspector of factories, workshops, mines, and quarries,

13 pages.

FACTORIES, MILLS, AND SHOPS BUILT.-Returns show that in 1906 in 105 towns 132 buildings were erected or enlarged, remodeled, etc., at a total cost of $2,937,500. These improvements provided for 3,724 additional employees.

A summary of improvements of this character is presented for the ten years 1897 to 1906 :

FACTORIES, MILLS, AND SHOPS BUILT OR ENLARGED, ETC., DURING THE YEARS

1897 TO 1906.

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LABOR UNIONS.—Under this title is given a list of all federations and unions reporting, together with the addresses of the secretaries. There were 2 State and 11 central federations and 215 local unions average of $1,916.67, none of the homes being unincumbered, while 80 reported an equity of $104,143 in property valued at $191,690.

RAILROAD EMPLOYEES.---This is an investigation of the conditions surrounding the employment of railroad men in the transportation branch of the service and a record of the accidents to railroad employees within the State during the year 1905, and of accidents to employees, passengers, and others during the period 1878 to 1905. Returns from the railroad employees show that the average run per month was 3,430 miles for 22 conductors on 5 different systems, 2,951 miles for 42 engineers on 9 different systems, 3,038 miles for 23 firemen on 6 different systems, and 2,772 miles for 22 trainmen on 6 different systems. For conductors the rate of pay was $3.45 per 100 miles, the reported average yearly earnings being $1,304.65; for engineers the rate of pay ranged from $3.80 to $4.80 per 100 miles, the reported average yearly earnings being $1,410; for firemen the rate of pay ranged from $2.30 to $3 per 100 miles, the reported average yearly earnings being $882.47, and for trainmen the rate of pay was $2.29 per 100 miles, the reported average yearly earnings being $757.

EMPLOYERS' STATISTICAL REPORT.-These returns, presented in two tables, cover the year 1905, and were furnished by employers in 882 industrial establishments, in 66 counties of the State, in which 35,551 persons were employed, 29,488 being wage-workers and 6,063 salaried employees.

The first table, arranged by counties, gives in detail character of industry, number of establishments reporting, number of employees (men, women, and children), hours worked per day, days in operation during the year, increases and decreases in wages, and amount paid in wages during the year to each class of wage-workers (men, women, and children). In addition there is given the amount paid in salaries during the year to men and women, together with the number employed of each sex.

The second table summarizes, by counties, the data presented in the first table. It shows that the 29,488 persons employed as wageworkers in the 882 establishments earned during 1905 the sum of $14,576,187. Of the total, 24,060 men earned $13,245,837; 4,645 women earned $1,202,047, and 783 children under 16 years of age earned $128,303. The average annual earnings of the men were $550.53; of the women, $258.78, and of the children under 16 years of age, $163.86. To the 6,063 salaried employees the sum of $1,655,432 was paid, $4,045,538 to 4,638 men and $609,894 to 1,425 women. The average annual salary received by the men was $872.26 and by the women $427.99. The average number of persons employed in each of the $ 882 establishments was 40, the average hours worked per day 9.95, and the average number of days per year 298. During the year 4,677 persons received an increase of pay averaging 8.64 per cent.

THE CANNING INDUSTRY.-The information relating to this industry is presented, by counties, in two tables. In the first table is shown for 1905 the number of plants reporting, time in operation, number of men, women, and children employed, hours worked per day, and amount paid in wages during the year to each class of wageworkers; also the number of men and women employed on salary, together with the total amount paid each class during the second table is a list of graded hourly rates showing that paid in each of the different occupations of the industry, hours worked per day and per week, and changes in the rates paid during 1905.

year. The

MAINE.

Twentieth Annual Report of the Bureau of Industrial and Labor

Statistics for the State of Maine. 1906. Samuel W. Matthews,
Commissioner. 221 pp.

In this report the subjects following are presented: Factories, mills, and shops built during 1906, 5 pages; labor unions, 71 pages; Stockton Harbor, Maine's new seaport, 17 pages; manufacturing industries, 18 pages; the Haskell silk mill, 4 pages; the paper-box industry, 3 pages; the pulp and paper industry, 69 pages; railroads, 5 pages; report of the inspector of factories, workshops, mines, and quarries,

13 pages.

FACTORIES, MILLS, AND SHOPS BUILT.-Returns show that in 1906 in 105 towns 132 buildings were erected or enlarged, remodeled, etc., at a total cost of $2,937,500. These improvements provided for 3,724 additional employees.

A summary of improvements of this character is presented for the ten years 1897 to 1906 :

FACTORIES, MILLS, AND SHOPS BUILT OR ENLARGED, ETC., DURING THE YEARS

1897 TO 1906.

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LABOR UNIONS.—Under this title is given a list of all federations and unions reporting, together with the addresses of the secretaries. There were 2 State and 11 central federations and 215 local unions

in 5+ cities, towns, and plantations. Of the local unions known to exist in 1906, 5 failed to report membership and 14 sent no report. The reports from the unions give, by cities and towns, the date of organization, the membership, the qualifications for membership, the initiation fees, dues, benefits allowed, the hours of labor, rates of wages, etc. The 196 local unions reporting comprised a membership of 14,772.

To the question, “ What have you accomplished for labor by organization ?” a wide range of replies was returned by the unions; but a majority of them asserted that higher wages and a shorter workday had been gained. To the question, "Do nonunion men enjoy the same conditions as to labor, wages, and steady employment as union men?" 190 unions made reply, 89 indicating that nonunion men enjoy equal conditions with union men and 101 that they do not.

Under this chapter is also given a discussion of the apprenticeship system, and the rules of the various unions governing apprentices, together with a history of the labor demands and disputes occurring during the year.

MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES.—The data presented in this chapter are compiled from the United States census of manufactures of Maine for 1905. Comparisons are also made with the United States census of manufactures for 1900.

THE PAPER-BOX INDUSTRY.-A general description of the more important paper-box factories in the State is given under this title, together with statistics of the industry for the entire State, for the United States, and for six States in which the industry is most prominent. In Maine, in 1905, there were 9 paper-box factories, with a capital of $144,900, which gave employment to 222 hands, to whom was paid in wages $70,416. The sum of $106,191 was paid for materials and the product was valued at $236,149.

The PUP AND PAPER INDUSTRY.- At the present time the making of pulp and paper is the leading manufacturing industry of Maine. The investigation considered in this report is confined principally to the year 1906. However, as a matter of general interest, and for purposes of comparison with other States, a list is presented of the States where the manufacture of pulp and paper in 1904 was a prominent industry, showing the value of the product in each State. Also, there is given a synopsis of the industry in the United States for the year 1904 compared with 1899, followed by a similar synopsis of the industry in the State of Maine.

The returns for 1906 give, by towns, a general description of each establishment, stating kind and degree of power used, kind of machinery, kind and amount of materials used, kind and amount of product, number of employees, etc. During the year the manufac

30649-Bull, 74-08-12

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