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(prevention of accidents) Act, 1960, has been certified in pursuance of the said section to be dangerous:

I hereby in pursuance of the powers conferred upon me by that act make the following regulations and direct that they shall apply to all places before mentioned.

These regulations shall come into force on the 1st day of January, 1907, except Regulations 1, 2, and 22, which shall come into force on the 1st day of January, 1908.

Subject to the exemptions below, it shall be the duty of (i) the occupier of any factory or workshop and any place to which any of the provisions of the Factory and Workshop Act, 1901, are applied, and (ii) the occupier of any line of rails or sidings used in connection with a factory or workshop, or with any place to which any of the provisions of the Factory and Workshop Act, 1901, are applied, to comply with Part I of these regulations.

And it shall be the duty of every person who by himself, his agents or workmen, carries on any of the operations to which these regulations apply, and of all agents, workmen and persons employed to comply with Part II of these regulations.

And it shall be the duty of every person who by himself, his agents, or workmen, carries on any of the operations to which these regulations apply, to comply with Part III of these regulations.

In these regulations:

Line of rails means a line of rails or sidings for the use of locomotives or wagons, except such lines as are used exclusively for (a) a gantry crane or traveling crane, or (3) any charging machine or other apparatus or vehicle used exclusively in or about any actual process of manufacture.

Wagon includes any wheeled vehicle or non-self-moving crane on a line of rails.

Locomotive includes any wheeled motor on a line of rails used for the movement of wagons and any self-moving crane.

Gantry means an elevated structure of wood, masonry, or metal, exceeding 6 feet in height and used for loading or unloading, which carries a line of rails, whereon wagons are worked by mechanical power.

Nothing in these regulations shall apply to: (a) A line of rails of less than 3 feet gauge, and locomotives and wagons used thereon. (b) A line of rails not worked by mechanical power. C) A line of rails inside a railway goods warehouse.

(d) A line of rails forming part of a mine within the meaning of the Coal Mines Regulation Act, 1887, or of a quarry within the meaning of the Quarries Act, 1894, not being a line of rails within or used solely in connection with any factory or workshop not incidental to the maintenance or working of the mine or quarry or to the carrying on of the business thereof.

(e) Pit banks of mines to which the Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act, 1872, applies, and private lines of rails used in connection therewith.

Lines of rails used in connection with factories or workshops, so far as they are outside the factory or workshop premises, and used for running purposes only.

(9) Wagons not moved by mechanical power. (h) Buildings in course of construction. (i) Explosivo factories or workshops within the meaning of the Explosives Act, 1875.

(j) All lines and sidings on or used in connection with docks, wharves and quays not forming part of a factory or workshop as defined in section 149 of the Factory and Workshop Act, 1901.

(k) Wagon or locomotive building or repairing shops, and all lines and sidings used in connection with such shops if such shops are in the occupation of a railway company within the meaning of the Regulation of Railways Act, 1871.

(1) Depots or car-sheds being parts of tramway or light railway undertakings authorized by Parliament, and used for the storage, cleaning, inspection or repair of tramway cars or light railway cars.

PART I.

1. Point rods and signal wires in such a position as to be a source of danger to persons employed shall be sufficiently covered or otherwise guarded.

2. Ground levers working points shall be so placed that men working them are clear of adjacent lines, and shall be placed in a position parallel to the adjacent lines, or in such other position, and be of such forin as to cause as little obstruction as possible to persons employed.

3. Lines of rails and points shall be periodically examined and kept in efficient order, having regard to the nature of the traffic.

4. Every gantry shall be properly constructed and kept in proper repair. It shall have a properly fixed structure to act as a stop-block at any terminal point; and at

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every part where persons employed have to work or pass on foot there shall be a suitable footway, and if such footway is provided between a line of rails and the edge of the gantry the same shall so far as is reasonably practicable, having regard to the traffic and working, be securely fenced at such a distance from the line of rails as to afford a reasonably sufficient space for such persons to pass in safety between the fence and a locomotive wagon or load on the line of rails.

5. Coupling poles or other suitable mechanical appliances shall be provided where required for the purpose of Regulation 11.

6. Proper sprags and scotches when required shall be provided for the use of persons in charge of the movement of wagons.

7. Where during the period between one hour after sunset and one hour before sunrise, or in foggy weather, shunting or any operations likely to cause danger to persons employed are frequently carried on, efficient lighting shall be provided either by hand lamps or stationary lights as the case may require at all points where necessary for the safety of such persons.

8. The mechanism of a capstan worked by power and used for the purpose of traction of wagons on a line of rails shall be maintained in efficient condition and if operated by a treadle such treadle shall be tested daily before use.

PART II.

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9. When materials are placed within 3 feet of a line of rails and persons employed are exposed to risk of injury from traflic by having to pass on foot over them or between them and the line, such material shall, as far as reasonably practicable, be so placed as not to endanger such persons, and there shall be adequate recesses at intervals of not more than 20 yards where the materials exceed that length.

10. No person shall cross a line of rails by crawling or passing underneath a train or wagons thereon where there may be a risk of danger from traffic.

11. Locomotives or wagons shall wherever it is reasonably practicable without structural alterations be coupled or uncoupled only by means of a coupling pole or other suitable mechanical appliance, except where the construction of locomotives or wagons is such that coupling or uncoupling can be safely and conveniently performed without any part of a man's body being within the space between the ends or buffers of one locomotive or wagon and another.

12. Sprags and scotches shall be used as and when they are required.

13. Wagons shall not be moved or be allowed to be moved on a line of rails by means of a prop or pole, or by means of towing by a rope or chain attached to a locomotive or wagon moving on an adjacent line of rails when other reasonably practicable means can be adopted; provided that this shall not apply to the movement of ladles containing hot material on a line of rails in front of and adjacent to a furnace.

In no case shall props be used for the above purpose unless made of iron, steel, or strong timber, hooped with iron, to prevent splitting.

14. Where a locomotive pushes more than one wagon, and risk of injury may thereby be caused to persons employed, a man shall, wherever it is saie and reasonably practicable, accompany or precede the front wagon or other ellicient means shall be taken to obviate such risk.

Provided that this regulation shall not apply to the following: (a) Fly shunting.

(b) Movement of wagons used for conveyance of molten or hot material or other dangerous substance.

15. No person shall be upon the buffer of a locomotive or wagon in motion unless there is a secure handhold and shall not stand thereon unless there is also a secure footplace; nor shall any person ride on a locomotive or wagon by means of a coupling pole or other like appliance.

16. No locomotive or wagon shall be moved on a line of rails until warning has been given by the person in charge to persons employed whose safety is likely to be endangered.

Provided that this regulation shall not apply to a self-moving crane within a building or to a charging machine or other vehicle so long as it is used in or about any actual process of manufacture.

17. Where persons employed have to pass on foot or work, no locomotive or wagon shall be moved on a line of rails during the period between one hour aiter sunset and one hour before sunrise, or in foggy weather, unless the approaching end, wherever it is sale and reasonably practicable, is distinguished by a suitable light or accompanied by a man with a lamp.

Provided that this regulation shall not apply to the movement of locomotives or wagons within any area which is efficiently lighted by stationary lights.

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18. The driver in charge of a locomotive, or a man preceding it on foot, shall give an efficient sound signal as a warning on approaching any level crossing over a line of rails regularly used by persons employed, or any curve where sight is intercepted, or any other point of danger to persons employed.

19. À danger signal shall be exhibited at or near the ends of any wagon or train of wagons undergoing repair wherever persons employed are liable to be endangered by an approaching locomotive or wagon.

20. (a) The space immediately around such a capstan as mentioned in Regulation 8 shall be kept clear of all obstruction.

(b) Such capstan shall not be set in motion until signals have been exchanged between the man in charge of the capstan and the man working the rope or chain attached to it.

(c) No person under 18 years of age shall work such capstan.

21. No person under the age of 18 shall be employed as a locomotive driver, and no person under the age of 16 shall be employed as a shunter.

PART III.

22. All glass tubes or water gauges on locomotives or stationary boilers used for the movement of wagons shall be adequately protected by a covering or guard.

H. J. GLADSTONE,

One of His Majesty's Principal Secretaries of State. Home OFFICE, Whitehall, 24th August, 1906.

RECENT REPORTS OF STATE BUREAUS OF LABOR STATISTICS.

ILLINOIS.

Thirteenth Biennial Report of the Bureau of Labor Statistics of the

State of Ilinois. 1904. David Ross, Secretary of Board of Commissioners of Labor. viii, 665 pp.

This report consists of two parts, as follows: Part I, manufactures of Illinois, 133 pages; Part II, working time, earnings, and general conditions of coal miners, 527 pages.

MANUFACTURES.-- This part presents the data collected and compiled by the United States census of manufactures of Illinois, made in 1905. The statistics presented are mainly for the year ending December 31, 1904. Comparisons are also made with the United States census of manufactures for 1900.

The following table presents, for the State, comparative statistics for the years 1904 and 1900:

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With the exception of the figures relating to the employment of children under 16 years of age, all of the items presented in the table show large increases in 1904 as compared with 1900. This decrease in the number of children employed (50.3 per cent) shows that the employment of child labor, especially in the larger manufacturing industries, is being rapidly lessened.

In Chicago in 1904 there were 8,159 establishments engaged in manufacturing industries, representing an invested capital of $637,743,474. There were employed by these establishments 40,276 salaried officials, clerks, etc., to whom were paid salaries aggregating $45,601,201, and 241,984 wage-earners, to whom were paid wages aggregating $136,404,696. Miscellaneous expenses amounted to $96,298,031. The cost of materials used was $589,913,993, and the value of products was $957,886,217.

In the six leading manufacturing industries of the city (electrical machinery, apparatus, and supplies, foundry and machine shop products, furniture, iron and steel, printing and publishing, and slaughtering and meat packing, wholesale) 1,884 establishments were engaged, representing an invested capital of $221,803,149. There were employed by these establishments 17,775 salaried officials, clerks, etc., to whom were paid salaries aggregating $19,869,755, and 82,266 wage-earners, to whom were paid wages aggregating $49,186,445. Miscellaneous expenses amounted to $35,514,610. The cost of materials used was $318,815,853, and the value of products was $454,977,196.

WORKING TIME, EARNINGS, AND GENERAL CONDITIONS OF COAL MINERS.—This investigation, for the calendar year 1903, embraces 21 of the coal-producing counties of the State, the mines canvassed being located at or contiguous to 58 cities and towns. Schedules were obtained from 10,426 workmen, of whom 8,818 were miners of coal and 1,608 other employees. The total workmen represented 37 separate occupations, the 1,608 other than miners proper representing 36 occupations. The data are presented in 16 tables.

Summarizing the returns it was found that the average yearly earnings of the 10,426 coal-mine employees was $541, while for the miners proper it was $527. The following statement shows for six wage groups the percentage of all employees and the percentage of miners proper whose yearly earnings fall within each specified group:

PER CENT OF COAL MINE EMPLOYEES WHOSE YEARLY EARNINGS FALL WITHIN

CERTAIN SPECIFIED WAGE GROUPS.

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From the above it is seen that 67.05 per cent of the employees, all occupations considered, earn under $600 per annum, while for miners alone 70.74 per cent earn under $600 per annum.

Of the total employees, 10,363 reported as to nativity, 5,825, or 56.21 per cent, of the number being native born and 4,538, or 43.79 per cent, being foreign born. Of the foreign born, 44.86 per cent were Austrians, Italians, Poles, and Russians, 50.30 per cent English,

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