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French, German, Irish, Scotch, Swede, and Welsh, and the remaining 4.84 per cent were other foreign born. Of the 8,775 miners who reported as to nativity, 54.48 per cent were native born and 45.52 per cent foreign born, and of the 1,588 other employees who reported as to nativity 65.74 per cent were native born and 34.26 per cent foreign born.

Relative to stability of employment, it was found that of the 8,818 miners 765, or 8.68 per cent, had been employed less than 5 years, 6,476, or 73.44 per cent, had been employed from 5 to 24 years, and 1,577, or 17.88 per cent, had been employed from 25 to 50 years or over; and that of the 1,608 other employees 280, or 17.41 per cent, had been 'employed less than 5 years, 1,116, or 69.40 per cent, had been employed from 5 to 24 years, and 212, or 13.19 per cent, had been employed from 25 to 50 years or over.

There were 24 employees (13 miners and 11 others) whose ages were reported as 16 years or under, 9,461 employees (7,988 miners and 1,473 others) whose ages were reported as over 16 years but under 50, and 941 employees (817 miners and 124 others) whose ages were reported as 50 years or over.

Returns were received from 7,035 mine employees (6,023 miners and 1,012 others) who owned and rented homes, this being 67.48 per cent of the total employees considered. There were 3,128 employees who owned homes of an average value of $1,016.60 each. Of this number 2,672 were miners who owned homes of an average value of $996.27 each, and 456 other employees who owned homes of an average value of $1,132.45 each. There were 3,907 employees who rented homes at an average yearly rental of $82.27 each. Of this number 3,351 were miners who rented homes at an average yearly rental of $81.72 each, and 556 other employees who rented homes at an average yearly rental of $85.60 each. Homes to the number of 997 were rented from the mining companies, and to the number of 2,910 from individuals. In connection with the homes owned and rented are shown the materials (brick or wood) of which the buildings are constructed, the condition of homes and neighborhood surroundings, and the health of workmen and of families.

Of the 10,426 coal-mine employees, 7,025 were married, 3,382 were single, and 19 were widowed. Of the 8,818 who were miners, 6,006 were married, 2,793 were single, and 19 were widowed; and of the 1,608 other employees, 1,019 were married and 589 were single. There were 3,811 workmen who reported as to their children attending school, and the number of children so reported as attending or having attended school was 7,817–7,197 in public, 90 in private, and 530 in parochial schools. There were 889 other children of other than miners who were reported at work-735 at work about the mines, 145 at other employment, and 9 were learning trades.

MISSOURI.

18 pages;

Twenty-seventh Annual Report of the Bureau of Labor Statistics and

Inspection of the State of Missouri, for the year ending November 5, 1905. William Anderson, Commissioner. 476 pp.

The following are the subjects presented in this report: Surplus products of counties, 75 pages; Government land in Missouri, 5 pages; statistics of manufactures, 218 pages; public utility plants,

labor organizations, 95 pages; free employment offices, 8 pages; chronology of Missouri bureau of labor, 10 pages; labor laws, 34 pages.

SURPLUS PRODUCTS.—Under this head are given for each of the 114 counties of the State the surplus products shipped in 1904, together with the values of the same, which aggregated $240,486,463.

STATISTICS OF MANUFACTURES.-Summarized returns covering 3,336 establishments in 64 industrial groups show for 1904 a total invested capital of $185,515,244, a total value of materials used of $211,702,438, and a total value of products of $348,344,052. During the year there were employed 116,964 males and 28,958 females, and there was paid out in wages a total of $65,724,234. The greatest number of children under 16 years of age employed at any one time during the year was 6,373--4,391 males and 1,982 females.

The following table shows for 1904, for each of the 22 industries in the State, which paid out in wages during the year a total exceeding $1,000,000, number of establishments, capital invested, value of products, amount paid in wages, and number of employees by sex:

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Bakeries.
Boots and shoes.
Brick and tile.
Candy and confectionery
Carriages and wagons.
Car works.
Cigars and tobacco.
Clothing..
Cooperage
Drugs and chemicals.
Flour mills.
Foundries and machine shops.
Furniture..
Glass.
Lime and cement.
Liquors, malt
Luinber, sa wed
Meat packing.
Planing mills.
Printing and binding.
Smelters.
Stoves and ranges.

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$2,996, 413 89,962, 070
4,836, 391 21, 321, 303
6,343, 809 4, 202, 318
2, 198, 902 6, 405, 227
2,991, 126 7, 102, 934
6, 505, 028 11, 702, 123
3, 477,845 18, 125, 358
4,093, 630 11,907, 304
1,618, 507 4,809. 030
3,718,022 7,099, 504
6, 778, 365 28. 397, (8
8,800 222

11,345,852
2,871, 322 5, 936, 353
2, 626, 150 2,305, 852
6, 711, 011 1,030, 806
45, 702, 919 19, 372, 375
3,741, 937 3, 603, 808
3,554, 765 59,917,970
3.829, 775 4,758, 047
8, 458, 807 13, 947, 344
9, 335, 841 9, 032, 375
2, 684, 947

$1,965, 078
4,057,939
2, 299, 028
1, 244, 146
1,816,736
2, 501, 575
2,050, 164
3,240, 342
1, 269, 327
1, 183, 947
1,319,898
4, 309,979
1,944,856
1, 267, 635
1,025, 723
4,461, 128
1, 544, 797
2, 269, 311
1,518, 620
5,605, 178
1,097, 559
2, 116, 474

2, 729
7,633
5, 726
1, 770
3, 544
5,058
2, 922
2,111
3,801
1,181
2, 648
8, 105
3,98
2, 342
1,390
6, 186
5,869
4,781
3,084
7, 332
2,787
3,379

1, 295 4,313

17 2,008

116

25 1,670 8,115

9 886

43 228 189

143 72 22 16 41 47 16 80 713 16 17

35

6,883, 025

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7 434

59 114

33 2,681

9 42

The report contains additional tables, which show for the various industries the number and wages of salaried employees, by sex, and the classified weekly earnings of adult males, adult females, and children under 16 years of age; and by occupations for skilled labor in each industry the number of males and females employed, weekly wages paid, hours of labor per day and per week, and wage changes during 1904.

PUBLIC UTILITY PLANTS.—This presentation shows, for 136 telephone companies, 81 electric light and power plants, 49 waterworks, and 20 gas plants, capital invested, receipts and expenditures, number of employees, wages paid, etc. In 1904 the telephone companies paid $953,520 in wages to 911 male and 994 female employees, the electric light and power plants $244,406 in wages to 429 male and 7 female employees, the waterworks $2,143,158 in wages to 1,271 male and 13 female employees, and the gas plants $979,360 in wages to 3,319 male and 45 female employees.

LABOR ORGANIZATIONS.-- This part of the report presents statistics for 1904 relative to the 624 labor organizations of the State. The membership of the organizations was 79,630 males and 2,403 females, a total of 82,033, or a decrease over 1903 of 16,069. Of the total adult wage-earners employed in the various trades represented, 80.82 per cent were organized. The average number of hours constituting a day's work in 1904 was 9.21, as compared with 9.33 in 1903, while the average minimum wage per hour in 1904 was 28.69 cents, as compared with 28.39 cents in 1903. During 1904 the average number of days employed was 258. On out-of-work, sick and accident, death, and strike benefits the organizations expended $319,243. Out-ofwork benefits were paid by 40 organizations, sick and accident benefits by 144, death benefits by 334, and strike benefits by 362. The average amount per week paid for sick and accident benefits was $1.72 and for strike benefits $5.51. The average amount of each death benefit paid was $110.11. There were 119 strikes and lockouts during the year, of which 63 were settled satisfactorily to the unions involved. The number of persons involved was 8,958, and the amount expended by the organizations in support of the strikes was $110,837. Wages aggregating $250,101 were lost to members through strikes during the year. Increase of wages during the year was reported by 40 organizations, reduction of hours of labor by 18. Appeals for arbitration were made in 60 instances, resulting in the 60 disputes being settled by that method. The unions reported 1,477 accidents during 1904, of which 152 were fatal.

FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES.-Returns from the free employment offices, located in St. Louis, Kansas City, and St. Joseph, for the year ending September 30, 1905, show 13,948 applications for positions (12,072 by males and 1,876 by females), 14,204 applications for help (10,586 for male help and 3,618 for female help), and that 8,400 positions were filled (7,322 by males and 1,078 by females).

LABOR LAWS.— This consists of a compilation of the various laws of the State relating to labor.

NEW YORK.

Sixth Annual Report of the Department of Labor, for the twelve months

ended September 30, 1906. Transmitted to the legislature January 2, 1907. P. Tecumseh Sherman, commissioner. Part I, 280 pp.; Part II, 275 pp.; Part III, 487 pp.; Part IV, 894 pp.

Part I consists of the annual report of the commissioner of labor relative to the operation of the department of labor, with recommendations on labor questions; preliminary reports of the bureau of factory inspection, the bureau of mediation and arbitration, and the final report of the free employment bureau in New York City; legislation and decisions of courts on questions affecting the interest of working people, and labor laws in force in the State October 1, 1906; Part II, Twenty-first annual report of the bureau of factory inspection; Part III, Twentieth annual report of the bureau of mediation and arbitration; Part IV, Twenty-fourth annual report of the bureau of labor statisties.

FREE PUBLIC EMPLOYMENT BUREAU.-During the seven months from October 1, 1905, to April 30, 1906, at which time the bureau was abolished, there were 2,790 applicants (1,440 males and 1,350 females) for positions, and 2,255 applications (571 for males and 1,684 for females) for help. The number of situations filled was 1,677, of which 433 were filled by males and 1,244 by females. Twenty-fourth Annual Report of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, for the

year ending September 30, 1906. This part embraces the following subjects: economic conditions of labor, 40 pages; trade unions in 1906, 20 pages; sanitary conditions in the printing trade, 84 pages; appendixes containing statistical tables, 830 pages; regulations in use in England for dangerous or unhealthsul industries, 50 pages; copies of forms used, 8 pages.

THE STATE OF EMPLOYMENT.—This chapter presents a continuous record, showing the number and percentage of members of labor unions unemployed in 1906, causes of and duration of idleness as reported by the officers of unions representing approximately onefourth the membership of trade unions in the State, and comparative statistics for preceding years. The smallest number of unions reporting for any month in 1906 was 190 and the largest number was 195, and the work people embraced by these monthly reports varied from 84,539 to 94,571. From the returns it appears that the state of employment was more favorable in 1906 than in either 1902, 1903, 1904, or 1905. The percentage of unemployment for those reporting for the five years being as follows: 1902, 14.8; 1903, 17.5; 1904, 16.9; 1905, 11.2, and 1906, 9.3. With the exception of the metals, machinery, and shipbuilding trades and the printing and binding trades, the average percentage of unemployment was lower in 1906 than in any of the four preceding years.

The following table shows the number and percentage of unionists idle at the end of March and September, 1905 and 1906, by causes:

NUMBER AND PER CENT OF MEMBERS OF LABOR UNIONS IDLE AT THE END OF

MARCH AND SEPTEMBER, 1905 AND 1906, BY CAUSES.

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WAGES AND EARNINGS.-Returns received from trade unions for the year 1906 show that an average weekly increase of $1.91 in wages was obtained by 77,799 males, and that 583 females obtained an average weekly increase of $1.11, while 397 males suffered an average weekly decrease of $1.90 in wages.

The following table shows the average earnings for the first and third quarters and for six months, as reported by trade unions in 1906: NUMBER AND AVERAGE EARNINGS OF ORGANIZED WORKING PEOPLE REPORTING FOR TIIE FIRST AND THIRD QUARTERS OF 1906, BY SEX AND GROUPS OF INDUSTRIES.

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$271. 15 178. 42

93. 22 204. 52

Building, stone working, etc..

135.676 132,6.57 $220. 19 $231.20 $471. 39 Transportation.. 62, 832 59.233 209.91 219.09,429.03 120 141 $127. 62 $143. 53 Clothing and textiles, 27, 489 28, 308 161. 80 157.54 319.40 6,175 0, 124 93. Ji 84. 88 Metals, machinery, and shipbuilding 34,721 35, 754 212. 36

222. 91 435. 27 32 29 50. 15 43.07 Printing, binding,etc. 23,645 25, 362 251.58 227.34 478.92 1,336 1,338

1

99. 96 104. 56 Wood working and furniture

11, 803 12. 476 194.00 202.43 403. 43 53 83 97.91 98. 95 Food and liquors. 13,564 13. 192 184. 32 136. 14 380, 96 Theaters and music

10,336 367. 26 201.01 661. 27 707 696 433. 83 351. 16 Tobacco..

9,603 9, 309 146.96 149.32 206.28 2,680 2,428 132.05 144, 89
Restaurants and re-
tail trade

7, 122 7,400 175. 66 180.65 356, 31 304 361 84. 79 136.41
Public employment.. 9,309 9,113 223. 74 231. 96 455. 70 172 114 119, 60 132. 96
Stationary enginemen 11,448 12,012 220.16 271. 42 500.58
Miscellaneous..

9, 471

10,021 183, 38 173. 18 30. 56 53 34 | 101.22 80.00

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