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PRICES of STOCKS, from SEPTEMBER 27, to OCTOBER 27 1792, both inclusive.

By ANTHONY CLARKE, Stock-Broker, No. 13, Sweeting's-Alley, Cornhill.
Bank
3 per c.
Long Short India India India South Sea Old

Navy English.
Stock.
confols. confols. consols. Ans. Ans, Stock,

Bonds.
reduced

Stock,
Ann.
Ann.

Bills. Lot. Tic.
27
hut. shot. 90

Thut.
117
fhut. thut. 209
thut. 1055.pr

Thut.

dir.
90.990
117 Ž

104
29

901 a
117

209
105

16 16 2 * 205 gola 17

209 105

90 1

16 15 205

210

105
,206
002a91

105

16 16
206
giagoš
117

2II
109

16 16 6
103

16 16 0
205

117
8

106

16 16 0 204

901190 204

106
211

16.15 6.
10
204
90a896
116

105

16.15 6
II
203
893 a 102 117

104
12 203
89a89

16 15 6
117
13
203
8929001
117

211
15

904893 117

104

16 15
26
* 204
892290

212
105

16 15 6
17

903
117

211
104

16 6

15 18 204 . 90-25

104

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211 19

104

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104

16 14
22
900

210

89

16 13 6
200
23 200
goja

104

90 24 200 7 go

90žaš 118

85
11

89
25
26
89 & gogas Ivo

118
27

25 II
210
107

16 14
♡ In the 3 per Cent. consols. the highest and lowest Price of each Day is given; in every other Article the highesc Price only, the Long and Short
Annuities excepted, which are given within a fixteenth of the highest Price. In the different Funds hat are thut, the Prices are given with the Dividend till the
Days of Opening.

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The UNIVERSAL MAGAZINE for November, 1792. 321

An Account of MARKTON HALL, in the County of Derby :

With a beautiful Perspective View of that elegant Seat. Arkton Hall, or, more pro- likewise ornamented with several good

perly, Markeaton Hall, the ele- pictures by Mr. Gilpin. gant seat of Francis Noel Clarke Several houses near Markeaton Mundy, esq. is situated in a small Hall have been lately taken down; a hamlet, belonging to the parish of circumstance, which would not have Mackworth, near the town of Derby. failed to excite the poetical indignaThe ancestors of this gentleman have tion of the Muse of Auburn, who resided on this spot upward of two would certainly have adduced it as hundred years. One of them, John a new, instance of the fatal instance of Mundy, esq. was lord-mayor of the depopulating wealth and all its concity of London in the year 1522: he comitant evils. died in the twenty-ninth year of the Sweet smiling village, loveliest of the lawn, reign of king Henry the eighth, pol- Thy sports are Hed, and all thy charms feffed of Markeaton, Mackworth, withdrawn. Allestry, and a very considerable ex Amid thy bowers the tyrant's hand is seen, tent of land at Chester and Findern, And defolation faddens all the green. between Derby and Burton upon And half a tillage Itints thy smiling plain.

One only master grasps thy whole domain, Trent.

Markeaton Hall is a very large and Along the lawn, where scatter'd hamlets noble mansion, with bow windows at

rose, the four corners. On the principal Unwieldy Wealth and cuinbrous Pomp front, toward Derby (that which is repose ; represented in the annexed plate) is a And every want to luxury allied, handsome pediment adorned with And every pang that Folly pays to Pride. vases. The front contains twenty

Those gentle hours that Plenty bade to

bloom, two windows, exclusive of those in Those calm desires that ask'd but flittle the basement ; and each of the sides

room, has twelve. In this house are many Those healthful sports that grac'd the

fine pictures, particularly, some half peaceful scene, · length portraits, painted by Mr. Liv'd in each look, and brighten'd all the

Wright of Derby, of friends of Mr. green;
Mundy's, his companions in his late These, far departing, seek a kinder shore,

And rural mirth and manners are no more. hunt. It is here doing but juslice (which will apologize for the di. Ye friends to truth, ye statesmen, who fura gression) to the merits of an admira

vey Ble artist, to observe how much the The rich man's joys increase, the poor's county of Derby is indebted to Mr.

decay, Wright, for his exquisite productions 'Tis yours to judge, how wide the limits

stand in every branch of painting. Whether he choose to catch the rude tower, Proud fiwe!Is the side with loads of freighted.

Between a splendid and a happy land. ing tor, overgrown with shrubs and moss, or to descend to humble por- And Mouting Foliy hails them from her trait; to snatch the Aaming horrors of Vesuvius, or paint the glowing Hoards, ev'n beyond the mifer's with, iron hilling from the: coals ; in each abound, he never fails to display a peculiar And rich men flock from all the would

around. felicity of execution. What pity then, that, from the long illness of its ex

Yet count our gains : this wealth is but a cellent master, his magic pencil should That leaves' our useful produ&t still the remain unemployed !--The house is fame. Vol. xci.

Ss

Not

* * * * *

ore,

snore ;

name,

Not so the loss. The man of wealth and contribute sometimes to the superior pride

cultivation of the country, and, at Takes up a space that many poor fop- others, to render more delightful the plied;

beautiful grounds and extensive planSpace for hic lake, his park's extended tations of some magnificent manfiont;

bounds, Space for his horfes, equipage; and hounds; the rich owner of which has the fa The robe, that wraps his linds in filken tisfaction, in course, of diftributing floth

food and raiment, and even health, Has robb'd the neighb’ring fields of half among all the peasantry around their growth;

Thus, near. Misley Hall, in Eflexs, His seat, where folitary fports are seen, the seat of the late Mr. Rigby, not Indignant spuins the cottage from the only an elegant church, but a smiling green.

town arose, as it were, his own cream GOLDSMITH'S DESERTED VILLAGE.

tion: while the improvements of his But the villagers of Markeaton are grounds afforded constant employe neither exiled from their country nor

ment to the neighbouring poor. from their parish. They are re

• Where is such an old man,' he one moved to Mackworth only. Indeed, day said to his steward -- I have while we are pleased with the beauti- discharged him, fir, because he canful effufions of the poet, we are in- not earn his wages.'-"But is he will clined to fufpect the fanciful theory of ing to work. Yes, fir.'- Fmthe politician. Goldsmith himself, in ploy him then, if it be only to pick the dedication of his charming poem up stones. No man that is willing, to the late fir Joshua Reynolds, has shall ever be discharged from my ferobserved, that he had been assured vice because he is unable to work.' by several of his best and wisest friends, An incident like this will certainly, at (and expected to be allured fo by his least in the opinion of benevolent patron too) that the depopulation he men, cover a multitude of political deplores is no where to be seen, and fins. It is a trait of exalted thinking, that the disorders, he laments are to which would do honour to the greatest be found only in the poet's own ima- and best of characters, and which gination.' Nothing, perhaps, can be therefore, (a digreffion as it is) we a greater blessing to a country than a record with particular satisfaction. noble manfion surrounded by extenlive

The environs of Markeaton are ex. grounds, in which the opulent owner tremely pleasant. Through Mr. Munis continually displaying the expenfve dy's grounds, and near his house, runs but beneficial spirit of improvement. Markeaton Brook, which reaches the Pope, who seems to have had jalter grounds and plantations of lord Scarf. notions of policy than Goldsmith, has, dale at Keddleston, where his lordship long ago tras happily and justly ex- has made a number of improvements preiled himself on this subject: on it, particularly a very fine bridge

of th:ee arches. Near Markeaton, Hence the poor are cloth’d, the hungry ftands the village of Mackworth, as Health to himself, and to his infants which place the remains of the gatebread,

way of a castle are to be seen. Lord: The labourer be?rs.

Scarsdale once thought of removing MORAL'ESSAYS, Ep. IV. this gateway to Keddleston, as an or

nament to his grounds, but, it is sup Numerous instances may be pro- pofed, he has now relinquished this duced in this country, not, as form. intention : indeed, had he persevered erly, of the ignorant and indolent in it, it must have excited universal villagers fufisting upon the alms of regret, as these ruins, removed from some opulent monafiery, but of ro. their proper place, would no longes bult and industrious labourers, who have formed an interesting object.

A De

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