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by him, be triable or tried or be punished for any crime or offense committed prior to his extradition, other than that for which he was delivered up, until he shall have had an opportunity of returning to the country from which he was surrendered.

ARTICLE IX. All articles seized, which are in the possession of the person to be surrendered at the time of his apprehension, whether being the proceeds of the crime or offense charged, or being material as evidence in making proof of the crime or offense, shall, so far as practicable and in conformity with the laws of the respective countries, be given up when the extradition takes place. Nevertheless, the rights of third parties with regard to such articles shall be duly respected.

ARTICLE X. If the individual claimed by one of the high contracting parties, in pursuance of the present Treaty, shall also be claimed by one or sereral other powers on account of crimes or offenses committed within their respective jurisdictions, his extradition shali be granted to the state whose demand is first received: Provided, That the Government from which extradition is sought is not bound by treaty to give preference otherwise.

ARTICLE XI. The expenses incurred in the arrest, detention, examination, and the delivery of fugitives under this Treaty shall be borne by the state in whose name the extradition is sought: Provided, that the demanding government shall not be compelled to bear any expense for the services of such public oflicers of the Government from which extradition is sought as receive a fixed salary; And, provided, that the charge for the services of such public officers as receive only fees or perquisites shall not exceed their customary fees for the acts or serv ices performed by them, had such acts or services been performed in ordinary criminal proceedings under the laws of the country of which they are officers.

ARTICLE XII. The present treaty shall take effect on the thirtieth day after the date of the exchange of ratifications, and shall not operate retroactively.

The ratifications of the present Treaty shall be exchanged at La Paz as soon as possible, and it shall remain in force for a period of six months after either of the contracting governments shall have given notice of a purpose to terminate it.

In witness whereof, the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the above articles, both in the English and the Spanish languages, and have here unto affixed their seals.

Done in duplicate at the city of La Paz, Bolivia, this twenty first day of April of one thousand nine hundred.

GEORGE H. BRIDGMAN [SEAL.]

ELIODORO VILLAZÓN. (SEAL.] BOLIVIA AND PERU.

(SEE PERC-BOLIVIA, PAGE 634.)

BORNEO.

1850.

CONVENTION OF AMITY, COMMERCE, AND NAVIGATION. Concluded June 23, 1850; ratification advised and time for exchange

of ratifications extended by the Senate June 23, 1852; ratified by the President January 31, 1853; ratifications exchanged July 11, 1853; proclaimed July 12, 1854. (Treaties and Conventions, 1889, p. 102.)

ARTICLES

zens.

war.

I. Amity.

VI. No export duty on products of II. Liberty of commerce.

Borneo. III. Protection to United States citi- VII. Supplies for American ships of IV. Freedom of imports and exports.

VIII. Shipwrecks. V. Tonnage on American ships; ex- IX. Extraterritoriality in Borneo; emptions.

ratification. His Highness Omar Ali Saifeddin ebn Marhoum Sultan Mahomed Jamalel Alam and Pañgiran Anak Mumin to whom belong the Government of the Country of Bruni and all its provinces and dependencies, for themselves and their descendants on the one part, and the United States of America, on the other, have agreed to cement the friendship which has long and happily existed between them, by a Convention containing the following Articles.

ARTICLE 1

Peace, friendship, and good understanding shall from henceforward and forever subsist between the United States of America and His Highness Omar Ali Saifeddin, Sultan of Borneo and their respective successors and Citizens and Subjects.

ARTICLE 2

The Citizens of the United States of America shall have full liberty to enter into, reside in, trade with, and pass with their merchandise through all parts of the dominions of His Highness the Sultan of Borneo, and they shall enjoy therein all the privileges and advantages with respect to commerce, or otherwise, which are now or which may hereafter be granted to the Citizens or Subjects of the most favored nation: and the subjects of His Highness the Sultan of Borneo, shall in like manner be at liberty to enter into, reside in, trade with, and pass through with their merchandise through all parts of the United States of America, as freely as the citizens and subjects of the most favored nation: and they shall enjoy in the United States of America all the privileges and advantages with respect to commerce, or otherwise, which are now or which may hereafter be granted therein to the Citizens or Subjects of the most favored nation.

ARTICLE 3

Citizens of the United States shall be permitted to purchase rent or occupy, or in any other legal way to acquire all kinds of property within the Dominions of Ilis Highness the Sultan of Borneo: and His Highness engages that such citizens of the United States of America shall, as far as lies in his power, within his dominions enjoy full and complete protection and security for themselves and for any property wbich they may so acquire in future, or which they may have acquired already before the date of the present convention

ARTICLE 4

No Article whatever shall be prohibited from being imported into or exported from the territories of His Highness the Sultan of Borneo; but the trade between the United States of America and the dominions of His Highness the Sultan of Borneo, shall be perfectly free and shall be subject only to the custom duties which may hereafter be in force in regard to such trade

ARTICLE 5 No duty exceeding one dollar per registered ton shall be levied on American vessels entering the ports of His Highness the Sultan of Borneo and this fixed duty of one dollar per ton to be levied on all American vessels shall be in lieu of all other charges or duties whatsoever. His Highness moreover engages that American trade and American goods shall be exempt from any internal duties and also from any injurious regulations which may hereafter, from whatever causes, be adopted in the dominions of the Sultan of Borneo

ARTICLE 6

His Highness the Sultan of Borneo agrees that no duty whatever shall be levied on the exportation from His Highness dominions of any article, the growth, produce, or manufacture of those dominions.

ARTICLE 7

His Highness the Sultan of Borneo engages to permit the Ships of War of the United States of America freely to enter the Ports, rivers and creeks, situate within his dominions and to allow such ships to provide themselves at a fair and moderate price, with such supplies, stores and provisions as they may from time to time stand in need of.

ARTICLE 8

If any vessel under the American flag should be wrecked on the coast of the dominions of His Highness the Sultan of Borneo, His Highness engages to give all the assistance in his power to recover for, and to deliver over to, the owners thereof, all the property that can be saved from such vessels. His Highness further engages to extend to the officers and crew and to all other persons on board of such wrecked vessels, full protection both as to their persons and as to their property

ARTICLE 9

His Highness the Sultan of Borneo, agrees that in all cases where a citizen of the United States shall be accused of any crime committed in any part of His Highness' dominions the person so accused shall be exclusively tried and adjudged by the American Consul, or other officer duly appointed for that purpose, and in all cases where disputes or differences may arise between American Citizens, or between American Citizens and the subjects of His Highness or between American Citizens and the Citizens or subjects of any other foreign power, in the dominions of the Sultan of Borneo, the American Consul or other duly appointed officer shall have power to hear and decide the same without any interference, molestation or hindrance, on the part of any authority of Borneo, either before during or after the litigation.

This Treaty shall be ratified and the ratifications thereof shall be exchanged at Bruni at any time prior to the fourth day of July in the year, eighteen hundred and fifty four.

Done at the city of Bruni, on this twenty third day of June, Anno Domini one thousand eight hundred and fifty and on the thirteenth day of the month Saaban of the year of the Hegira one thousand two hundred and sixty six. [SEAL.]

JOSEPH BALESTIER, (SEAL.]

OMAR ALI SAIFEDDIN.

BRAZIL.

1828.

TREATY OF AMITY, COMMERCE, AND NAVIGATION.

Concluded December 12, 1828; ratification advised by the Senate March

10, 1829; ratified by the President March 10, 1829; ratifications exchanged March 18, 1829; proclaimed March 18, 1829. (Treaties and Conventions, 1889, p. 105.)

(By a notice given from the Emperor of Brazil this treaty, "only for articles relating to commerce and navigation,” was terminated December 12, 1841.)

ARTICLES.

I. Amity.
II. Favored nation clause.
III. Freedom of commerce and navi-

gation; coasting trade.
IV. No discrimination on vessels.
V. Import and export duties.
VI. Freedom of trade.
VII. Embargoes.
VIII. Asylum in ports.
IX. Captures by pirates.

X. Shipwrecks.
XI. Disposal of property.
XII. Special protection.
XIII. Religious freedom.
XIV. Rights of neutrals.
XV. Neutral property under enemies'

flag.
XVI. Contraband of war.
XVII. Trade with nonblockaded ports.

XVIII. Seizure of contraband articles.
XIX. Blockades.

XX. Visitation and search.
XXI. Ship’s papers in case of war.
XXII. Vessels under convoy.
XXIII. Prize courts.
XXIV. Letters of marque forbidden.

XXV. Protection in case of war.
XXVI. Confiscation forbidden.
XXVII. Diplomatic officers.
XXVIII. Consular officers.
XXIX. Exequaturs.

XXX. Consular exemptions.
XXXI. Deserters from ships.
XXXII. Consular convention.
XXXIII. Duration; effect, etc.; ratifica-

tion.

In the name of the Most Holy and Indivisible Trinity.

The United States of America and His Majesty the Emperor of Brazil, desiring to establish a firm and permanent peace and friendship between both Nations, have resolved to fix, in a manner, clear, distinct and positive, the rules which shall in future be religiously observed between the one and the other, by means of a Treaty or general Convention of Peace, Friendship Commerce and Navigation.

For this most desirable object the President of the United States has conferred full powers on William Tudor their Chargé d'Affaires at the Court of Brazil: and His Majesty the Emperor of Brazil on the Most Illustrious and Most Excellent Marquez of Aracaty, a Mem ber of His Council, Gentleman of the Imperial Bed Chamber, Councillor of the Treasury, Grand Cross of the Order of Aviz, Senator of the Empire, Minister and Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs and Miguel de Souza Mello e Alvim, a Member of His Council, Commander of the Order of Aviz, Knight of the Imperial Order of the Cross, Chief of Division in the Imperial and National Navy, Minister and Secretary of State for the Marine, who after having exchanged their said full powers, in due and proper form, have agreed to the following articles.

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