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nation whose interests are committed to their charge, particularly in reference to the adjustment of wages and the execution of contracts, without the interference of the local authorities, unless the conduct of the crew and the officers, or of the Captains, should disturb the order or tranquillity of the country.

It is however, understood that this species of judgment or arbitration shall not deprive the contending parties of the right they have to resort on their return to the judicial authority of their country.

ARTICLE II.

The Consuls General, Consuls, Vice Consuls and Commercial Agents are authorized to require the assistance of the local authorities for the search, arrest and imprisonment of the deserters from the ships of war and merchant vessels of their country. For this purpose they shall apply to the competent tribunals, judges and officers, and shall in writing demand said deserters, proving by the exhibition of the registers of the vessels, the rolls of the crews, or by other official documents, or, if the vessel shall have departed, by copy of said documents duly certified by them, that such individuals form part of the crew; and on this reclamation being thus substantiated, the surrender shall not be refused, unless there be sufficient proof of the said persons being citizens or subjects of the country where their surrender is demanded. Such deserters when arrested shall be placed at the disposal of said Consuls General, Consuls, Vice Consuls or Commercial Agents, and may be confined in the public prisons at the request and cost of those who shall claim them, in order to be detained until the time when they shall be restored to the vessels to which they belonged, or sent back to their own country by a vessel of the same nation, or any other vessel whatsoever. But if not sent back within three months from the day of their arrest, they shall be set at liberty and shall not be again arrested for the same cause.

However if the deserter should be found to have committed any crime or offence, his surrender may be delayed until the tribunal before which his case shall be depending shall have pronounced its sentence, and such sentence shall have been carried into effect.

The present additional articles shall have the same force and value as if they were inserted, word for word, in the Convention signed at Washington on the twenty-sixth day of April, one thousand eight hundred and twenty-six, and being approved and ratified by the President of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate thereof, and by His Majesty the King of Denmark, the ratification shall be exchanged at Washington within six months from the date hereof, or sooner, if possible.

In faith whereof, we, the undersigned, in virtue of our respective full powers, have signed the present additional articles, and have thereto affixed our seals.

Done in triplicate at the City of Washington on the eleventh day of July, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty one.

WILLIAM H. SEWARD).

SEAL
W. R. RAASLOFF.

[SEAL.]

1872.

NATURALIZATION CONVENTION.

Concluded July 20, 1872; ratification advised by the Senate January

13, 1873; ratified by the President January 22, 1873; ratifications erchanged March 14, 1873; proclaimed April 15, 1873. (Treaties and Conventions, 1889, p. 241.)

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ARTICLES.

I. Naturalization recognized.

IV. Duration. II. Readmission to former status.

V. Ratification. III. Renunciation of acquired status.

The United States of America and his Majesty the King of Denmark being desirous to regulate the citizenship of the citizens of the United States of America who have emigrated, or who may emigrate, from the United States of America to the Kingdom of Denmark, and of Danish subjects who have emigrated, or who may emigrate from the Kingdom of Denmark to the United States of America, have resolved to conclude a Convention for that purpose, and have named as their Plenipotentiaries, that is to say,

The President of the United States of America:
Michael J. Cramer,
Minister Resident of the United States of America at Copenhagen;
and His Majesty the King of Denmark:
Otto Ditlev Baron Rosenörn-Lehn,

Commander of Danebrog and Danebrogsmand, Chamberlain, His Majesty's Minister for Foreign Affairs, &c., &c., &c.; who, after hav. ing communicated to each other their respective full Powers, found to be in good and due form, have agreed upon and concluded the following Articles, to wit:

ARTICLE I.

Citizens of the United States of America who have become, or shall become, and are naturalized, according to law, within the Kingdom of Denmark as Danish subjects, shall be held by the United States of America to be in all respects and for all purposes Danish subjects, and shall be treated as such by the United States of America.

In like manner, Danish subjects who have become, or shall become, and are naturalized, according to law, within the United States of America as citizens thereof, shall be held by the Kingdom of Denmark to be in all respects and for all purposes as citizens of the United States of America, and shall be treated as such by the Kingdom of Denmark.

ARTICLE II.

If any such citizen of the United States, as aforesaid, naturalized within the Kingdom of Denmark as a Danish subject, should renew his residence in the United States, the United States Government may, on his application, and on such conditions as that Government may see fit to impose, readmit him to the character and privileges of a citizen of the United States, and the Danish Government shall not, in that case, claim him as a Danish subject on account of his former naturalization.

In like manner, if any such Danish subject, as aforesaid, naturalized within the United States as a citizen thereof, should renew his residence within the Kingdom of Denmark, His Majesty's Government may, on his application, and on such conditions as that Government may think fit to impose, readmit him to the character and privileges of a Danish subject, and the United States Government shall not, in that case, claim him as a citizen of the United States on account of his former naturalization.

ARTICLE III.

If, however, a citizen of the United States, naturalized in Denmark, shall renew his residence in the former country without the intent to return to that in which he was naturalized, he shall be held to have renounced his naturalization.

In like manner, if a Dane, naturalized in the United States, shall renew his residence in Denmark without the intent to return to the former country, he shall be held to have renounced his naturalization in the United States.

The intent not to return may be held to exist, when a person naturalized in the one country shall reside more than two years in the other country.

ARTICLE IV.

The present convention shall go into effect immediately on or after the exchange of the ratifications, and shall continue in force for ten years. If neither party shall have given to the other six months previous notice of its intention then to terminate the same, it shall further remain in force until the end of twelve months after either of the Contracting Parties shall have given notice to the other of such intention.

ARTICLE V.

The present Convention shall be ratified by the President of the United States of America, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate thereof, and by His Majesty the King of Denmark, and the ratifications shall be exchanged at Copenhagen as soon as may be within eight months from the date hereof.

In witness whereof, the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the same, and have affixed thereto their respective seals.

Done at Copenhagen the twentieth day of July, in the year of our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and Seventy Two.

MICHAEL J. CRAMER.

[SEAL.]
O. D. ROSENÖRN-LEAN.

[SEAL.]

1886.

AGREEMENT FOR MUTUAL EXEMPTION OF VESSELS FROM READMEAS

UREMENT.

Signed at Washington, February 26, 1886. The Government of the United States of America and the Government of His Majesty the King of Denmark having found it expedient to enter into an agreement for the mutual exemption from readmeasurement of United States and Danish vessels in the ports of their respective countries, bave authorized the undersigned to sign the following declaration.

I. Danish steam and sailing vessels shall be exempted from readmeasurement in all ports of the United States, and the net register tonnage denoted in their certificate of registry and nationality shall be deemed to be equal to the net or register tonnage of vessels of the United States, provided only, that, if in any case it shall be found that a vessel has added to her carrying capacity since the issue of her register or certificate of admeasurement, the spaces or houses so added shall be admeasured and the usual fee exacted.

II. Steam and sailing vessels of the United States shall be exempted from readmeasurement in all Danish ports, and the net or register tonnage stated in their certificates of registry shall be deemed to be equal to the net register tonnage of Danish ships; provided only, that in cases in which the certificates of vessels of the United States express the gross tonnage only, deductions of the spaces or compartments appropriated to the use of the crew of the vessel in steam and sailing vessels, and of the spaces occupied by or necessary for the propelling power in steam vessels, shall be made according to the Danish rules for admeasurement, without any expense to the vessel.

The present agreement shall take effect on the 1st of April, 1886.

Done in duplicate at Washington, D. C. this twenty-sixth day of February, 1886. (SEAL.

T. F. BAYARD. [SEAL.]

P. LÖVENÖRN.

1888.

AGREEMENT SUBMITTING CLAIM OF CARLOS BUTTERFIELD & Co.

TO ARBITRATION.

Concluded December 6, 1888; ratification advised by the Senate Fehru

ary 11, 1889; ratified by the President April 23, 1889; ratifications exchanged May 23, 1889; proclaimed May 24, 1889. (U. S. Stats.,

, vol. 26, p. 1490.)

By this agreement the claim of Butterfield & Co. for indemnity for seizure of vessels by the Danish colonial authorities of St. Thomas, West Indies, was referred to Sir Edmund Monson, by whom it was disallowed.

1892.

TRADE-MARK CONVENTION.

Concluded June 15, 1892; ratification advised by the Senate July 21,

1892; ratified by the President July 29, 1892; ratifications erchanged September 28, 1892; proclaimed October 12, 1892. (U. S. Stats., vol. 27, p. 963.)

ARTICLES.

1. Reciprocal rights.

III. Duration. II. Formalities.

IV. Ratification. With a view to secure for the manufacturers in the United States of America, and those in Denmark, the reciprocal protection of their Trade Marks and Trade Labels, the Undersigned, duly authorised to that effect, have agreed on the following dispositions.

ARTICLE I.

The subjects or citizens of each of the High Contracting Parties shall in the Dominions and Possessions of the other have the same rights as belong to native subjects or citizens, in everything relating to Trade Marks and Trade Labels of every kind.

Provided, always, that in the United States the subjects of Denmark, and in Denmark, the citizens of the United States of America, cannot enjoy these rights to a greater extent or for a longer period of time than in their native country.

ARTICLE II. Any person in either country desiring protection of his Trade Mark in the Dominions of the other must fulfil the formalities required by the law of the latter; but no person, being a subject or citizen of one of the contracting States, shall be entitled to claim protection in the other by virtue of the provisions of this convention, unless he shall have first secured protection in his own country in accordance with the laws thereof.

ARTICLE III. This arrangement shall go into effect immediately on or after the exchange of the ratifications and shall be in force until a year after it has been recalled by the one or the other of the two High Parties.

ARTICLE IV. The present convention shall be ratified by the President of the United States of America by and with the advice and consent of the Senate thereof and by His Majesty the King of Denmark, and the ratifications shall be exchanged at Copenhagen as soon as may be within ten months from the date hereof.

In witness whereof the Undersigned have signed the present convention and have affixed thereto the seal of their arms. Done at Copenhagen in double expedition the 15. June 1892.

CLARK E. CARR.

[SEAL.] REEDTZ THOTT.

(SEAL.] S. Doc. 318.58-2-16

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