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that where the mainland coast is indented by deep inlets forming part of the territorial waters of Russia, the width of the lisière was to be measured (a) from the line of the general direction of the mainland coast, or () from the line separating the waters of the ocean from the territorial waters of Russia, or (@) from the heads of the aforesaid inlets?

7. What, if any exist, are the mountains referred to as situated parallel to the coast, which mountains, when within 10 marine leagues from the coast, are declared to form the eastern boundary?

And whereas His Britannic Majesty duly appointed Richard Everard, Baron Alverstone, G. C. M G. Lord Chief Justice of England, Sir Louis Amable Jetté KCMG Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of Quebec, and Allen Bristol Aylesworth one of His Majesty's Counsel, and the President of the United States of America duly appointed the Honourable Elihu Root Secretary of War of the United States, the Honourable Henry Cabot Lodge, Senator of the United States from the State of Massachusetts and the Honourable George Turner of the State of Washington, to be members of the said Tribunal.

Now therefore we the Undersigned having each of us first subscribed an oath as provided by the said Convention and having taken into consideration the matters directed by the said Convention to be considered by us, and having judicially considered the said questions submitted to us, do hereby make Answer and Award as follows:

In answer to the first question The Tribunal unanimously agrees that the point of commencement of the line is Cape Muzon.

In answer to the second question

The Tribunal unanimously agrees that the Portland Channel is the Channel which runs from about 55° 56' NL and passes to the north of Pearse and Wales Islands.

A majority of the Tribunal that is to say Lord Alverstone Mr Root Mr Lodge and Mr Turner decides that the Portland Channel after passing to the north of Wales Island is the channel between Wales Island and Sitklan Island called Tongass Channel. The Portland Channel above mentioned is marked throughout its length by a dotted red line from the point B to the point marked C on the map signed in duplicate by the members of the Tribunal at the time of signing their decision.

In answer to the third question

A majority of the Tribunal that is to say Lord Alverstone Mr Root Mr Lodge and Mr Turner decides that the course of the line from the point of commencement to the entrance to Portland Channel is the line marked A B in red on the aforesaid map.

In answer to the fourth question

A majority of the Tribunal that is to say Lord Alverstone Mr Root Mr Lodge and Mr Turner decides that the point to which the line is to be drawn from the head of the Portland Channel is the point on the 56th parallel of latitude marked D on the aforesaid map and the course which the line should follow is drawn from C to D on the aforesaid map.

In answer to the fifth question

A majority of the Tribunal, that is to say Lord Alverstone Mr Root Mr Lodge and Mr Turner decides that the answer to the above question is in the affirmative

Question five having been answered in the affirmative question six requires no answer.

In answer to the seventh question

A majority of the Tribunal that is to say Lord Alverstone, Mr Root, Mr Lodge and Mr Turner decides that the mountains marked S on the aforesaid map are the mountains referred to as situated parallel to the coast on that part of the coast where such mountains marked S are situated and that between the points marked P (mountain marked S 8,000) on the north and the point marked T (mountain marked S 7,950) in the absence of further survey the evidence is not sufficient to enable the Tribunal to say which are the mountains parallel to the coast within the meaning of the Treaty.

In witness whereof we have signed the above written decision upon the questions submitted to us. Signed in duplicate this twentieth day of October 1903.

ALVERSTONE.
ELIHU ROOT
HENRY CABOT LODGE

GEORGE TURNER
Witness
REGINALD TOWER:

Secretary.

GREECE.

1837.

TREATY OF COMMERCE AND NAVIGATION.

Concluded December 22, 1837; ratification advised by the Senate March

; 26, 1838; ratified by the President April 12, 1838; ratifications exchanged June 13, 1838; proclaimed August 30, 1838. (Treaties and Conventions, 1889, p. 502.)

ARTICLES.

I. Freedom of commerce.

XI. Unloading part of cargo. II. Tonnage duties, etc.

XII.) III. Imports.

XIII.

These articles abrogated by IV. Exports.

XIV.J treaty concluded Nov. 19, 1902 V. Coasting trade.

XV. Quarantine. VI. Government purchases.

XVI. Blockades.
VII. Navigation duties.

XVII. Duration.
VIII. No discriminating prohibitions. XVIII. Ratification.
IX. Transit, bounties, and drawbacks.
X. Vesselsentering without unloading.

The United States of America and His Majesty the King of Greece, equally animated with the sincere desire of maintaining the relations of good understanding which have hitherto so happily subsisted between their respective States, of extending also and consolidating the commercial intercourse between them; and convinced that this object cannot better be accomplished than by adopting the system of an entire freedom of Navigation, and a perfect reciprocity, based upon principles of equity equally beneficial to both countries; Have, in consequence, agreed to enter into negotiations for the conclusion of a Treaty of Commerce and Navigation, and for that purpose have appointed Plenipotentiaries; The President of the United States of

merica, Andrew Stevenson, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States, near the Court of Her Britannic Majesty, and His Majesty the King of Greece, Spiridion Tricoupi Councillor of State on Special Service, his Envoy Extraordinary, and Minister Plenipotentiary near the same Court, Grand Commander of the Royal Order of the Saviour, Grand Cross of the American Order of Isabella the Catholic, Who, after having exhanged their full powers, found in good and due form, have agreed upon the following Articles:

ARTICLE I.

· The Citizens and subjects of each of the two High Contracting Parties may, with all security for their persons, vessels, and cargoes, freely enter the ports, places, and rivers of the Territories of the other, wherever Foreign Commerce is permitted. They shall be at liberty to sojourn and reside in all parts whatsoever of said territories; to rent and occupy houses and warehouses for their commerce, and they shall enjoy, generally, the most entire security and protection in their Mercantile Transactions, on conditions of their submitting to the Laws and Ordinances of the Respective Countries.

ARTICLE II.

Greek vessels arriving either laden or in ballast, into th Ports of the United States of America, from whatever place they may come, shall be treated on their entrance, during their stay, and at their departure upon the same footing as National Vessels coming from the same place, with respect to the duties of tonnage, light houses, pilotage, and port charges, as well as to the perquisites of Public Officers, and all other duties or charges of whatever kind or denomination, levied in the name, or to the profit of the Government, the Local Authorities, or of any Private Establishment whatsoever.

And, reciprocally, the Vessels of the United States of America arriving either laden, or in ballast, into the Ports of the Kingdom of Greece, from whatever place they may come, shall be treated on their entrance, during their stay, and at their departure upon the same footing as National Vessels coming from the same place, with respect to the duties of tonnage, light-houses, pilotage, and port charges, as well as to the perquisites of Public Officers; and all other duties or charges, of whatever kind or denomination, levied in the name, or to the profit of the Government, the Local Authorities, or of any Private Establishments whatsoever.

ARTICLE III.

All that may be lawfully imported into the United States of America, in Vessels of the said States, may also be thereinto imported in Greek Vessels, from whatever place they may come, without paying other or higher duties or charges, of whatever kind or denomination, levied in the name or to the profit of the Government, the Local Authorities, or of any Private Establishments whatsoever, than if imported in National Vessels.

And, reciprocally, all that may be lawfully imported into the Kingdom of Greece, in Greek Vessels, may also be thereinto imported, in Vessels of the United States of America, from whatever place they may come, without paying other or higher duties or charges, of whatever kind or denomination, levied in the name, or to the profit of the Government, the Local Authorities, or of any Private Establishments whatsoever, than if imported in National Vessels.

ARTICLE IV.

All that may be lawfully exported from the United States of America, in Vessels of the said States, may also be exported therefrom in Greek Vessels, without paying other or higher duties or charges of whatever kind or denomination, levied in the name or to the profit of the Government, the Local Authorities, or of any Private Establishments whatsoever, than if exported in National Vessels.

And, reciprocally, all that may be lawfully exported from the Kingdom of Greece, in Greek Vessels, may also be exported therefrom in Vessels of the United States of America, without paying other or higher duties or charges, of whatever kind or denomination, levied in the name, or to the profit of the Government, the Local Authorities, or of any Private Establishments whatsoever, than if exported in National Vessels.

ARTICLE V.

It is expressly understood that the foregoing second, third, and fourth Articles are not applicable to the Coast-wise Navigation from one Port of the United States of America to another Port of the said States; nor to the navigation from one port of the Kingdom of Greece to another port of the said Kingdom, which navigation each of the two High Contracting Parties reserves to itself.

ARTICLE VI.

Each of the two High Contracting Parties engages not to grant, in its purchases, or in those which might be made by Companies or Agents acting in its name, or under its authority, any preference to importations made in its own vessels, or in those of a third Power, over those made in the vessels of the other Contracting Party.

ARTICLE VII.

The two High Contracting Parties engage not to impose upon the Navigation between their respective Territories, in the vessels of either, any tonnage or other duties of any kind or denomination, which shall be higher or other than those which shall be imposed on every other Navigation, except that which they have reserved to themselves respectively by the fifth Article of the present Treaty.

ARTICLE VIII.

There shall not be established in the United States of America, upon the products of the soil or industry of the Kingdom of Greece, any prohibition or restriction of importation or exportation, nor any duties of any kind or denomination whatsoever, unless such prohibitions, restrictions, and duties shall likewise be established upon articles of like nature, the growth of any other Country;

And, reciprocally, there shall not be established in the Kingdom of Greece on the products of the soil or industry of the United States of America, any prohibition or restriction of importation or exportation, nor any duties of any kind or denomination whatsoever, unless such prohibitions, restrictions, and duties be likewise established upon articles of like nature, the growth of any other Country.

ARTICLE IX.

All privileges of transit and all bounties and drawbacks which may be allowed within the territories of one of the High Contracting Parties, upon the importation or exportation of any article whatsoever, shall, likewise, be allowed on the articles of like nature, the products of the soil or industry of the other Contracting Party, and on the importations and exportations made in its vessels.

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