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of their wearing apparel, nor of the possession and use of their money, not exceeding for the captain, supercargo, mate, and passengers five hundred dollars each, and for the sailors one hundred dollars each.

ART. 28.

It is further agreed that in all cases the established courts for prize causes, in the country to which the prizes may be conducted, shall alone take cognizance of them. And whenever such tribunal of either of the parties shall pronounce judgment against any vessel, or goods, or property claimed by the citizens of the other party, the sentence or decree shall mention the reasons or motives on which the same shall have been founded, and an authenticated copy of the sentence or decree, and all of the proceedings in the case, shall, if demanded, he delivered to the commander or agent of the said vessel without any delay, he paying the legal fees for the same.

ART. 29.

When the ships of war of the two contracting parties, or those belonging to their citizens which are armed in war shall be admitted to enter with their prizes the ports of either of the two parties, the said public or private ships, as well as their prizes, shall not be obliged to pay any duty either to the officers of the place, the judges, or any others; nor shall such prizes, when they come to and enter the ports of either party, be arrested or seized, nor shall the officers of the place make examination concerning the lawfulness of such prizes; but they may hoist sail at any time and depart and carry their prizes to the places expressed in their commissions, which the commanders of such ships shall be obliged to show. It is understood, however, that the privileges conferred by this article shall not extend beyond those allowed by law or by treaty with the most favored nation.

ART. 30.

It shall not be lawful for any foreign privateers who have commissions from any prince or state in enmity with either nation to fit their ships in the ports of either, to sell their prizes, or in any manner to exchange them; neither shall they be allowed to purchase provisions, except such as shall be necessary to their going to the next port of that prince or state from which they have received their commissions.

ART. 31.

No citizen of Hayti shall apply for or take any commission or letters of marque

for arming any ship or ships to act as privateers against the said United States, or any of them, or against the citizens, people, or inhabitants of the said United States, or any of them, or against the property of any of the inhabitants of any of them, from any prince or state with which the said United States shall be at war; nor shall any citizen of the said United States, or any of them, apply for or take any commission or letters of marque for arming any ship or ships to act as privateers against the citizens or inhabitants of Hayti, or any of them, or the property of any of them, from any prince or state with which the said Republic shall be at war; and if any person of either nation shall take such commission or letters of marque, he shall be punished according to their respective laws.

ART. 32.

The high contracting parties, desiring to avoid all inequality in their public communications and official intercourse, agree to grant to their Envoys, Ministers, and other diplomatic agents, the same favors, privileges, immunities, and exemptions, which the most favored nations do or shall enjoy; it being understood that whatever favors, privileges, immunities, or exemptions, the United States of America or the Republic of Hayti may find it proper to give to the Envoys, Ministers, and other diplomatic agents, of any other Power, shall by the same act be extended to those of each of the contracting parties.

ART. 33.

To protect more effectually the commerce and navigation of their respective citizens, the United States of America and the Republic of Hayti agree to admit and receive, mutually, consuls and vice-consuls in all their ports open to foreign commerce, who shall enjoy, within their respective consular districts, all the rights, prerogatives, and immunities of the consuls and vice-consuls of the most favored nation.

ART. 34.

In order that the consuls and vice-consuls of the two contracting parties may enjoy the rights, prerogatives, and immunities which belong to them by their public character, they shall, before exercising their official functions, exhibit to the Government to which they are accredited their commissions or patents in due form; and, having obtained their exequatur, they shall be acknowledged, in their official character, by the authorities, magistrates, and inhabitants, in the consular district in which they reside.

ART. 35.

It is also agreed that the consuls, their secretaries, officers, and persons attached to the service of consuls, they not being citizens of the country in which the consul resides, shall be exempt from all kinds of imposts, taxes, and contributions, except those which they shall be obliged to pay on account of their commerce or property, to which the citizens or inhabitants, native or foreign, of the country in which they reside, are subject; being, in everything besides, subject to the laws of the respective States.

The archives and papers of the consulates shall be respected inviolably; and under no pretext whatever shall any person, magistrate, or other public authority seize or in any way interfere with them.

ART. 36.

The said consuls and vice-consuls shall have power to require the assistance of the authorities of the country for the arrest, detention, and custody of deserters from the ships of war and merchant vessels

of their country. For this purpose they shall apply to the competent tribunals, judges, and officers, and shall, in writing, demand such deserters, proving by the exhibition of the registers of the vessels, the muster-rolls of the crews, or by any other official documents, that such individuals formed a part of the crews; and on this claim being substantiated the surrender shall not be refused. Such deserters.

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, when arrested, shall be placed at the disposal of the consuls and viceconsuls, and may be confined in the public prisons at the request and cost of those who shall claim them, in order to be sent to the vessels to which they belong, or to others of the same country. But if not sent back within three months, to be counted from the day of their arrest, they shall be set at liberty, and shall not again be arrested for the same cause.

ART. 37.

For the purpose of more effectually protecting their commerce and navigation, the two contracting parties do hereby agree, as soon hereafter as circumstances will permit, to form a consular convention, which shall declare specially the powers and immunities of the consuls and vice-consuls of the respective parties.

ART. 38.

It is agreed that the high contracting parties shall, on requisitions made in their name, through the medium of their respective diplomatic agents, deliver up to justice persons who, being charged withi the crimes enumerated in the following article, committed within the jurisdiction of the requiring party, shall seek an asylum or shall be found within the territories of the other:

Provided, That this shall be done only when the fact of the commission of the crime shall be so established as to justify their apprehension and commitment for trial, if the crime had been committed in the country where the persons so accused shall be found; in all of which the tribunals of said country shall proceed and decide according to their own laws.

ART. 39,

Persons shall be delivered up, according to the provisions of this treaty, who shall be charged with any of the following crimes, to wit: murder (including assassination, parricide, infanticide, and poisoning); attempt to commit murder; piracy; rape; forgery; the counterfeiting of money; the utterance of forged papers; arson; robbery; and embezzlement by public officers; or by persons hired or salaried, to the detriment of their employers; when these crimes are subject to infamous punishment.

ART. 40.

The surrender shall be made, on the part of each country, only by the authority of the Executive thereof. The expenses of the detention and delivery, effected in virtue of the preceding articles, shall ha at the cost of the party making the demand.

ART. 41.

The provisions of the foregoing articles relating to the extradition of fugitive criminals shall not apply to offences committed before the date hereof, nor to those of a political character.

Neither of the contracting parties shall be bound to deliver up its own citizens under the provisions of this treaty.

ART. 42.

The present treaty shall remain in force for the term of eight years, dating from the exchange of ratifications; and if one year before the expiration of that period neither of the contracting parties shall have given notice to the other of its intention to terminate the same, it shall continue in force, from year to year, until one year after an official notification to terminate the same, as aforesaid.

ART. 43.

The present treaty shall be submitted on both sides to the approval and ratification of the respective competent authorities of each of the contracting parties, and the ratifications shall be exchanged, at Washington, within six months from the date hereof, or sooner if possible.

In faith whereof the respective plenipotentiaries have signed the foregoing articles, in the English and French languages, and they have hereunto affixed their seals.

Done in duplicate, at the city of Port-au-Prince, this third day of November, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-four.

B. F. WHIDDEN SEAL.
BOYER BAZELAIS [SEAL.]

1902.

NATURALIZATION TREATY.

Concluded March 22, 1902; ratification advised by Senate February 1,

1904; ratified by President March 17, 1904; ratifications exchanged March 19, 1904; proclaimed, March 24, 1904. (Ú. S. Stat., vol. 33.)

ARTICLES.

1. Reciprocal recognition of citizens. V. Declaration of intention. II. Renunciation of nationality.

VI. Duration. III. Intent to return.

VII. Ratification. IV. Punishment of citizens.

The United States of America and the Republic of Haiti desiring to regulate the citizenship of those persons who may emigrate from the United States to Haiti, or from Haiti to the United States, bave resolved to conclude a treaty on this subject.

For that purpose they have appointed their Plenipotentiaries, to-wit:

The President of the United States: John Hay, Secretary of State of the United States;

The President of Haiti: Mr. J. N. Léger, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of Haiti at Washington;

Who, after the mutual communication of their respective full powers, found in good and due form, have agreed upon the following articles:

ARTICLE I.

Citizens of the United States of America who shall have been duly naturalized as citizens of Haiti, and who shall have resided uninterruptedly in Haiti during a period of five years, shall be recognized by the United States as citizens of Haiti.

Reciprocally, citizens of Haiti who shall have been duly naturalized as citizens of the United States of America, and who shall have resided uninterruptedly in the United States during a period of five years, shall be recognized by Haiti as citizens of the United States.

This article shall apply as well to those already naturalized in either country as those hereafter naturalized.

ARTICLE II.

The person who, after having become a naturalized citizen of one of the contracting States, shall return to live in the country of his origin, without intention to return to the country where he has been naturalized, shall be considered as having renounced the nationality obtained through naturalization.

ARTICLE III.

The intent not to return may be held to exist when the person naturalized in the one country resides more than two years in the other country.

ARTICLE IV.

The naturalized citizens of either State who return to their country of origin, will be there liable to prosecution and punishment in conformity to the laws for the crimes or misdemeanors committed before their emigration and that are not covered by the statute of limitations.

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ARTICLE V.

The declaration of intention to become a citizen of the one or the other country has not for either party the effect of naturalization.

ARTICLE VI.

The present treaty shall remain in force for ten years from the date of the exchange of ratifications; and unless one of the contracting parties shall notify the other of its intention to terminate it one year before the expiration of that period, the said treaty shall continue in force from year to year until the expiration of one year after official notice shall have been given by either of the contracting governments of a purpose to terminate it.

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