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ARTICLE XVII.

The High Contracting Parties agree to the following arrangement:

The several Foreign Settlements in Japan shall, from the date this Treaty comes into force, be incorporated with the respective Japanese Communes, and shall thenceforth form part of the general municipal system of Japan. The competent Japanese Authorities shall thereupon assume all municipal obligations and duties in respect thereof, and the common funds and property, if any, belonging to such Settlements shall at the same time be transferred to the said Japanese Authorities.

When such incorporation takes place existing leases in perpetuity upon which property is now held in the said Settlements shall be confirmed, and no conditions whatsoever other than those contained in such existing leases shall be imposed in respect of such property. is, however, understood that the Consular Authorities mentioned in the same are in all cases to be replaced by the Japanese Authorities. All lands which may previously have been granted by the Japanese Government free of rent for the public purposes of the said Settlements shall, subject to the right of eminent domain, be permanently reserved free of all taxes and charges for the public purposes for which they were originally set apart.

ARTICLE XVIII.

This treaty shall, from the date it comes into force, be substituted in place of the Treaty of Peace and Amity concluded on the 3d day of the 3d month of the 7th year of Kayei, corresponding to the 31 st day of March, 1854; the Treaty of Amity and Commerce concluded on the 19th day of the 6th month of the 5th year of Ansei, corresponding to the 29th day of July, 1858; the Tariff Convention concluded on the 13th day of the 5th month of the 2nd year of Keio, corresponding to the 25th day of June, 1866; the Convention concluded on the 25th day of the 7th month of the 11th year of Meiji, corresponding to the 25th day of July, 1878, and all Arrangements and Agreements subsidiary thereto concluded or existing between the High Contracting Parties; and from the same date such Treaties, Conventions, Arrangements and Agreements shall cease to be binding, and, in consequence, the jurisdiction then exercised by Courts of the United States in Japan and all the exceptional privileges, exemptions and immunities then enjoyed by citizens of the United States as a part of, or appurtenant to such jurisdiction, shall absolutely and without notice cease and determine, and thereafter all such jurisdiction shall be assumed and exercised by Japanese Courts.

ARTICLE XIX. This Treaty shall go into operation on the 17th day of July, 1899, and shall remain in force for the period of twelve years from that date.

Either High Contracting Party shall have the right, at any time thereafter to give notice to the other of its intention to terminate the same, and at the expiration of twelve months after such notice is given this Treaty shall wholly cease and determine.

ARTICLE XX. This Treaty shall be ratified, and the ratifications thereof shall be exchanged, either at Washington or Tokio, as soon as possible and not later than six months after its signature.

In witness whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the present Treaty in duplicate and have thereunto affixed their seals.

Done at the City of Washington the 22d day of November in the eighteen hundred and ninety-fourth year of the Christian era, corresponding to the 22d day of the 11th month of the 27th year of Meiji.

WALTER Q. GRESHAM SEAL)
SHINICHIRO KURINO. SEAL]

PROTOCOL.

The Government of the United States of America and the Government of His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, deeming it advisable in the interests of both countries to regulate certain special matters of mutual concern, apart from the Treaty of Commerce and Navigation signed this day, hare, through their respective Plenipotentiaries, agreed upon the following stipulations:

1. It is agreed by the Contracting Parties that one month after the exchange of the ratifications of the Treaty of Commerce and Navigation signed this day the Import Tariff now in operation in Japan in respect of goods and merchandize imported into Japan by citizens of the United States shall cease to be binding. From the same date the General Statutory Tariff of Japan shall, subject to the provisions of Article IX of the Treaty of March 31, 1854, at present subsisting between the Contracting Parties, so long as said Treaty remains in force, and, thereafter, subject to the provisions of Article IV and Article XIV of the Treaty signed this day, be applicable to goods and merchandize being the growth, prodnce or manufacture of the Territories of the United States upon importation into Japan.

But nothing contained in this Protocol shall be held to limit or qualify the right of the Japanese Government to restrict or to prohibit the importation of adulterated drugs, medicines, food or beverages; indecent or obscene prints, paintings, hooks, cards, lithographic or other engravings, photographs or any other indecent or obscene articles, articles in violation of the patent, trade-mark or copy-right laws of Japan: or any other article which for sanitary reasons, or in view of public security or morals, might offer any danger.

2. The Japanes: Governinent, pending the opening of the country to citizens of the United States, agrees to extend the existing passport system in such a manner as to allow citizens of the United States, on the production of a certificate of recommendation from the Representative of the United States at Tokio, or from any of the Consuls of the United States at the open ports of Japan, to obtain upon application passports available for any part of the country and for any period not exceeding twelve months, from the Imperial Japanese Foreign Office in Tokio, or from the Chief Authorities in the Prefecture in which an open port is situated, it being understood that the existing Rules and Regulations governing citizens of the United States who visit the interior of the Empire are to be maintained.

3. The undersigned Plenipotentiaries have agreed that this Protocol shall be submitted to the two High Contracting Parties at the same time as the Treaty of Commerce and Navigation signed this day, and that when the said Treaty is ratified the agreements contained in the Protocol shall also equally be considered as approved, without the necessity of a further formal ratification.

It is agreed that this Protocol shall terminate at the same time the said Treaty ceases to be binding.

In witness whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the same and have affixed thereto their seals.

Done at Washington the 22d day of November in the eighteen hundred and ninety-fourth year of the Christian era, corresponding to the 20 day of the 11th month of the 27th year of Meiji.

WALTER Q. GRESHAM (SEAL)

SHINICHIRO KURINO (SEAL] S. Doc. 318, 58-2--31

1897.

CONVENTION AS TO PATENTS, TRADE-MARKS, AND DESIGNS. Concluded January 13, 1897; ratification adrised by the Senate February 1, 1897; ratified by the President February 2, 1897; ratifications exchanged March 8, 1897; proclaimed March 9, 1897. (U. S. Stats., vol. 29, p. 860.)

The President of the United States of America and Ilis Majesty the Emperor of Japan, being desirous of securing immediate reciprocal protection for patents, trade-marks and designs, have resolved to conclude a Convention for that purpose, and have appointed as their Plenipotentiaries:

The President of the United States, the Honorable Richard Olney, Secretary of State of the United States; and His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, Toru Hoshi, Jushii, His Majesty's Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary near the Government of the United States;

Who, after having communicated to each other their respective full powers, found in good and due form, have agreed as follows:

Article XVIa of the Treaty of Commerce and Navigation between the United States of American and Japan concluded at Washington on the twenty-second day, the eleventh month, the twenty-seventh year of Meiji, corresponding to the twenty-second day of November, eighteen hundred and ninety-four of the Christian Era, shall have full force and effect from the date of the exchange of ratifications of this convention.

The present convention shall be duly ratified by the President of the United States of America, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate thereof, and by His Majesty the Emperor of Japan in the usual manner; and the ratifications shall be exchanged at Tokyo as soon as possible.

In wituess whereof, the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed this convention and have thereunto affixed their seals.

Done, in duplicate original, at Washington, this thirteenth day of January in the one thousand eight hundred and ninety seventh year of the Christian Era.

RICHARD OLNEY (SEAL)
TORU HOSHI (SEAL)

a See Article XVI,

p. 479.

KONGO.

(CONGO.)

1884.

DECLARATION AS TO THE INTENTION OF THE INTERNATIONAL Asso

CIATION OF THE CONGO AND THE RECOGNITION OF ITS FLAG BY THE UNITED STATES, SIGNED APRIL 22, 1884. (ADVISED BY THE SENATE APRIL 10, 1884.)

Declaration by the International Association of the Congo. The International Association of the Congo, hereby declares that by Treaties with the legitimate sovereigns in the basins of the Kongo and of the Niadi-Kiahm and in adjacent territories upon the Atlantic, there has been ceded to it, territory for the use and benefit of free States established, and being established, under the care and supervision of the said Association in the said basins and adjacent territories, to which session the said free States of right succeed.

That the said International Association has adopted for itself and for the said Free States, as their standard, the flag of the International African Association, being a blue flag with a golden star in the center.

That the said Association and the said States have resolved to levy no Custom-Hlouse duties upon goods or articles of merchandise imported into their territories or brought by the route which has been constructed around the Congo cataracts; this they have done with a view of enabling commerce to penetrate into Equatorial Africa.

That they guarantee to foreigners settling in their territories the right to purchase, sell or lease, lands and buildings situated therein, to establish commercial houses and to there carry on trade upon the sole condition that they shall obey the laws. They pledge themselves, moreover, never to grant to the citizens of one nation any advantages without immediately extending the same to the citizens of all other nations, and to do all in their power to prevent the Slave-trade.

In testimony whereof, Henry S. Sanford, duly empowered therefor, by the said Association, acting for itself and for the said Free States, has hereunto set his hand and affixed his seal, this twenty-second day of April, 1884, in the city of Washington. [SEAL.]

H. S. SANFORD.

Recognition of the flag by the United States. Frederick T. Frelinghuysen, Secretary of State, duly empowered therefor by the President of the United States of America, and pursuant to the advice and consent of the Senate, heretofore given, acknowledges the receipt of the foregoing notification from the International Association of the Congo, and declares that, in harmony with the traditional policy of the United States, which enjoins a proper regard for the commercial interests of their citizens while, at the same time, avoiding interference with controversies between other powers as well as alliances with foreign nations, the Government of the United States announces its sympathy with, and approval of, the humane and benevolent purposes of the International Association of the Congo, administering, as it does, the interests of the Free States there established, and will order the officers of the United States, both on land and sea, to recognize the flag of the International African Association, as the flag of a friendly Government.

In testimony whereof, he has hereunto set his hand and affixed his seal, this twenty-second day of April, A. D., 1884, in the city of Washington. [SEAL.]

FREDK. T. FRELINGHUYSEN,

1891.

TREATY OF AMITY, COMMERCE, AND NAVIGATION. Concluded January 24, 1891; ratification advised by the Senate Janu

ary 11, 1892; ratified by the President January 19, 1892; ratifications erchanged February 2, 1892; proclaimed April 2, 1892. (U. S. Stat., vol. 27, p. 926.)

ARTICLES.

I. Freedom of commerce and navi

gation.
II. Property rights.
III. Exemptions of service.
IV. Religious freedom.

V. Consular officers.
VI. Shipping privileges.
VII. Transportation.
VIII. Prohibitions.

IX. (Not agreed to.)

X. Import duties.
XI. Most favored nation privileges.
XII. Other privileges.
XIII. Arbitration.
XIV. Conditions.
XV. Ratificaíion.

Senate resolution of ratification.

The United States of America, and

llis Majesty Leopold II, King of the Belgians, Sovereign of the Independent State of the Congo,

desiring to perpetuate, confirm and encourage the relations of commerce and of good understanding existing already between the two respective countries by the conclusion of a treaty of amity, commerce, navigation and extradition, have for this purpose named as their respective plenipotentiaries, viz:

His Excellencv, the President of the United States of America,

Edwin H. Terrell, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States of America near His Majesty the King of the Belgians; and

His Majesty, Leopold II King of the Belgians, Sovereign of the Independent State of the Congo,

Edm. Van Eetvelde, Administrator General of the Department of Foreign Affairs, Officer of His order of Leopold,

who, after having communicated to each other their full powers, found in good and due form, have agreed upon the following articles:

ARTICLE I.

There shall be full, entire and reciprocal liberty of commerce, establishment and navigation between the citizens and inhabitants of the two High contracting Parties.

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