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It shall be ratified by both contracting parties, and its ratifications shall be exchanged at the City of Mexico as soon as possible.

In witness whereof, the respective plenipotentiaries have signed the present convention both in the English and Spanish languages and thereunto affixed their seals.

Done in duplicate at the City of Mexico this 22nd day of February, 1899.

POWELL CLAYTON SEAL)
IGNO MARISCAL SEAL

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1899.

BOUNDARY CONVENTION.

Concluded December 22, 1899; ratification advised by Senate February

8, 1900; ratified by President February 14, 1900; ratifications ecchanged May 5, 1900; proclaimed May 7, 1900.

This convention further extended the duration of the convention of March 1, 1889, for one year.

1900.
WATER BOUNDARY CONVENTION.

Concluded November 21, 1900; ratification advised by Senate December

15, 1900; ratified by President December 24, 1900; ratifications exchanged December 24, 1900; proclaimed December 24, 1900. (U. S. Stats., vol. 31, p. 1936.)

Whereas the United States of America and the United States of Mexico desire to give full effect to the provisions of the Convention concluded and signed in Washington March 1, 1889, to facilitate the execution of the provisions contained in the Treaty signed by the two Iligh Contracting Parties on the 12th of November 1884, and to avoid the difficulties arising from the changes which are taking place in the beds of the Bravo del Norte and Colorado Rivers in those parts which serve as a boundary between the two Republics;

And whereas the period fixed by Article IX of the Convention of March 1, 1889, extended by the Conventions of October 1, 1895, November 6, 1896, October 29, 1897, December 2, 1898, and December 22, 1899, expires on the 24th of December, 1900;

And whereas the two High Contracting Parties deem it expedient to indefinitely continue the period fixed by Article IX of the Convention of March 1, 1889, and by the sole article of the Convention of October 1, 1895, that of November 6, 1896, that of October 29, 1897, that of December 2, 1898, and that of December 22, 1899, in order that the International Boundary Commission may be able to continue the examination and decision of the cases submitted to it, they have, for that purpose, appointed their respective Plenipotentiaries, to wit:

The President of the United States of America, John Hay, Secretary of State of the United States of America; and

a See Supplementary Extradition with Mexico (p. 551).

The President of the United States of Mexico, Manuel de Azpiroz, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the United States of Mexico at Washington;

Who, after having communicated to each other their respective full powers, found in good and due form, have agreed upon and concluded the following Article:

ARTICLE.

The said Convention of March 1, 1889, as extended on the several dates above mentioned, and the Commission established thereunder shall continue in force and effect indefinitely, subject, however, to the right of either contracting party to dissolve the said Commission by giving six months' notice to the other; but such dissolution of the Commission shall not prevent the two governments from thereafter agreeing to revive the said Commission, or to reconstitute the same, according to the terms of the said Convention; and the said convention of March 1, 1889, as hereby continued, may be terminated twelve months after notice of a desire for its termination shall have been given in due form by one of the two contracting parties to the other.

This Convention shall be ratified by the two High Contracting Parties in conformity with their respective Constitutions, and the ratifications shall be exchanged in Washington as soon as possible.

In testimony whereof, we, the undersigned, by virtue of our respective powers, have signed this Convention in duplicate, in the English and Spanish languages, and have affixed our respective seals.

Done in the City of Washington on the 21st day of November, one thousand nine hundred.

JOHN HAY [SEAL.]
M. DE AZPÍROZ

SEAL.

1902.

SUPPLEMENTARY EXTRADITION CONVENTION.

Concluded June 25, 1902; ratification advised by Senate March 11,

1903; ratified by President March 18, 1903; ratifications exchanged March 28, 1903; proclaimed April 3, 1903. (U. S. Stats., vol. 33, p.)

ARTICLE.

Extraditable offense; bribery.

The United States of America and the United States of Mexico being desirous to add the crime of bribery to the list of crimes or offenses on account of which extradition may be granted under the Convention concluded between the two countries on the 22nd day of February, 1899, with a view to the better administration of justice and the prevention of crime in their respective territories and jurisdictions, have resolved to conclude a Supplementary Convention for this purpose and have appointed as their Plenipotentiaries, to-wit:

The President of the United States of America, Powell Clayton Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of said United States at Mexico, and

The President of the United States of Mexico, Don Ignacio Mariscal, Secretary of Foreign Relations.

Who, after having communicated to each other their respective full powers, which were found to be in due and proper form, have agreed to and concluded the following

ARTICLE

The following crime is added to the list of crimes or offenses numbered 1 to 20 in the second Article of the said Convention of February 22, 1899, on account of which extradition may be granted, that is to say:

Bribery, defined to be the giving, offering or receiving of a reward to influence one in the discharge of a legal duty.

The present Convention shall be ratified and the ratifications shall be exchanged at the City of Mexico as soon as possible.

It shall come into force ten days after its publication in conformity with the laws of the High Contracting Parties, and it shall continue and terminate in the same manner as the said Convention of February 22, 1899.

testimony whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the present Convention in duplicate and have hereunto affixed their seals.

Done in duplicate at the City of Mexico, in the English and Spanish languages, this twenty-fifth day of June one thousand nine hundred and two. SEAL.

POWELL CLAYTON (SEAL..

IGNO. MARISCAL

MOROCCO.

1787.

TREATY OF PEACE AND FRIENDSHIP.

Concluded January, 1787; ratified by the Continental Congress July

18, 1787. (Treaties and Conventions, 1889, p. 724.) This treaty of twenty-six articles, negotiated by Thos. Barclay and signed by John Adams and Thom. Jefferson, was superseded by the following Treaty of 1836.

1836.

TREATY OF PEACE AND FRIENDSHIP.

Concluded September 16, 1836; ratification advised by the Senate Jan

uary 17, 1837; ratified by the President January 28, 1837; proclaimed January 30, 1837. (Treaties and Conventions, 1889, p. 729.)

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ARTICLES.

I. Emperor's consent.
II. No service with an enemy.
III. Captures.
IV. Ships' passports.

V. Right of search.
VI. Release of captives.
VII. Supplies to vessels.
VIII. Repairs to vessels.
IX, Shipwrecks.

X. Protection of war ships.
XI. Immunities of ports.
XII. Freedom of war ships.
XIII. Salutes.
XIV. Most favored nation commerce.

XV. Privileges to merchants.
XVI. Exchange of prisoners.
XVII. Trade privileges.
XVIII. Examination of exports.
XIX. No detention, etc., of vessels.
XX. Consul to decide disputes in

Morocco.
XXI. Trials of homicides and assaults.
XXII. Estates of deceased Americans.
XXIII. Consular privileges.
XXIV. Agreement in case of differ-

ences; most favored nation

privileges. XXV. Duration.

In the name of God, the Merciful and Clement!

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This is the copy of the treaty of peace which we have made with the Ainericans, and written in this book; affixing thereto our blessed seal, that, with the help of God, it may remain firm forever.

Written at Meccanez, the City of Olives, on the 3d day of the month Jumad el lahhar, in the year of the Hegira 1252. (Corresponding to September 16, A. D. 1836.)

554

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ARTICLE I. We declare that both parties have agreed that this treaty, consisting of twenty five articles, shall be inserted in this book, and delivered to James R. Leib, Agent of the United States, and now their resident Consul at Tangier, with whose approbation it has been made, and who is duly authorized on their part to treat with us concerning ail the matters contained therein.

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ARTICLE II. If either of the parties shall be at war with any nation whatever. the other shall not take a commission from the enemy, nor fight under their colors.

ARTICLE III. If either of the parties shall be at war with any nation whaterer, and take a prize belonging to that nation, and there shall be found on bourd subjeets or effects belonging to either of the parties, the subjects shall be set at liberty, and the effects returned to the owners And if any goods belonging to any nation, with whom either of the parties shall be at war, shall be loaded on vessels belonging to the other party, they shall pass free and unmolested, without any attempt being made to take or detain them.

ARTICLE IV. A signal, or pass, shall be given to all vessels belonging to both parties, by which they are to be known when they meet at sea; and if the commander of a ship of war of either party shall have other ships under his convor, the declaration of the commander shall alone be suficient to exempt any of them from examination.

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ARTICLE V.

either of the parties shall be at war, and shall meet a vessel at So belonging to the other, it is agreed, that if an examination is to on made, it shall be done by sending a boat with two or three men the offending parir shall make good all damages. and it any gun shall be fired, and injury done, without reason,

ARTICLE VI.

If any Moor shall bring citizens of the United States, or their effects, the effects restored; and, in like manner, if any Moor, not a subject to llis Minjesty, the citizens shall immediately be set at liberty, and of these dominions, shall make prize of any of the citizens of America or their effects, and bring them into any of the ports of His Majesty, they shall be immediately released, as they will then be considered as

under His Majesty's protection.

have occasion for provisions or other supplies, they shall be furnished

If any vessel of either party shall put into a port of the other, and

ARTICLE VII.

without any interruption or molestation.

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