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ARTICLE LX.

The Geneva Convention applies to sick and wounded interned in neutral territory.

In pursuance of the stipulations of Article III of the said Convention the ratifications of the said Convention were deposited at The Hague on the 4th day of September, 1900, by the Plenipotentiaries of the Governments of Germany. Austria-Hungary, Belgium, Denmark, Spain, France, Great Britain, Italy, the Netherlands, Persia, Portugal, Roumania, Russia, Siam, and Bulgaria; on the 6th day of October, 1900, by the Plenipotentiary of the Government of Japan: on the 16th day of October, 1900, by the Plenipotentiary of the Government of Montenegro; on the 4th day of April, 1901, by the Plenipotentiary of the Government of Greece; on the 17th day of April, 1901, by the Plenipotentiary of the Government of Mexico; on the 11th day of May, 1901, by the Plenipotentiary of the Government of Servia; on the 12th day of July, 1901, by the Plenipotentiary of the Government of Luxembourg; and on the 5th day of April, 1902, by the Plenipotentiary of the Government of the United States of America:

SUPPLEMENT:

CONTAINING TREATIES PROCLAIMED SINCE THE ADJOURNMENT OF THE SECOND SESSION OF THE FIFTY-EIGHTH

CONGRESS, APRIL 28, 1904.

947

FRANCE.

RELATIONS IN TUNIS.

Signed March 15, 1904; ratification advised by the Senate March 24, 1904; ratified by the President May 6, 1904; ratifications exchanged May 7, 1904; proclaimed May 9, 1904.

ARTICLES:

I. Renunciation of treaties with Tunis, etc.
II. Ratification.

The President of the United States of America and the President of the French Republic, acting in his own name as well as in that of His Highness the Bey of Tunis, desiring to determine the relations between the United States and France in Tunis, and desiring to define the treaty situation of the United States in the Regency, have named for that purpose the following plenipotentiaries:

The President of the United States of America, John Hay, Secretary of State of the United States; and

The President of the French Republic, J. J. Jusserand, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of France at Washington;

Who, after communicating to each other their full powers, which were found in good and due form, have agreed upon the following Articles:

ARTICLE I.

The Government of the United States declares that it renounces the right of invoking in Tunis the stipulations of the Treaties made between the United States and the Bey of Tunis in August 1797, and in February 1824, and that it will refrain from claiming for its Consuls and citizens in Tunis other rights and privileges than those which belong to them in virtue of international law or which belong to them in France by reason of treaties in existence between the United States and France. The Government of the French Repuglic agrees on its side to assure these rights and privileges in Tunis to the Consuls and citizens of the United States and to extend to them the advantage of all treaties and conventions existing between the United States and France.

ARTICLE II.

The present convention shall be ratified and the ratifications shall be exchanged at Washington as soon as possible.

In witness whereof, the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the foregoing Articles and have affixed their seals.

Done in duplicate at Washington, in the English and French languages, the 15th day of March, in the year 1904.

JOHN HAY [SEAL.]
JUSSERAND [SEAL.]

EXTRADITION WITH THE NETHERLANDS.

1904.

EXTRADITION.

Concluded January 18, 1904; ratification advised by Senate January 27, 1904; ratified by the President May 26, 1904; ratifications exchanged May 28, 1904; proclaimed May 31, 1904.

ARTICLES.

I. Convention applicable to possessions | IV. Amendatory of the treaty of June 2, and colonies.

II. Extraditable crimes.

III. Procedure.

1887.

V. Provisional arrest and detention. VI. Duration; ratification.

The United States of America and Her Majesty the Queen of the Netherlands, having judged it expedient to extend to their respective island possessions and colonies the Convention for the extradition of criminals, concluded at Washington on June 2, 1887, by means of an additional Convention, have to that end appointed as their plenipotentiaries:

The President of the United States of America: John Hay, Secretary of State of the United States; and

Her Majesty the Queen of the Netherlands: Baron Willem Alexander Frederik Gevers, Her Majesty's Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to the United States;

who, after having communicated to each other their respective full powers, found in good and due form, have agreed upon and concluded the following articles:

ARTICLE I.

The provisions of the Convention for the extradition of criminals concluded at Washington June 2, 1887, shall be applicable to the island possessions of the United States of America and the colonies of the Netherlands; but, since they are based upon the law of the mother country, only provided that they are compatible with the laws or regulations in force in those island possessions and colonies, and with the observance of the following stipulations:

ARTICLE II.

In addition to the persons mentioned in article II of that Convention, those shall also be surrendered who are charged with or have been convicted of the crime of bribery, provided it be an extraditable crime by the laws or regulations in force in the respective island possessions and colonies of the contracting parties, or of the crime of piracy by statute or by the law of nations.

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