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Congress I find that all reports of committees, together with the views of the minority, shall be referred to the Committee of the Whole.

The President

To the Committee of the Whole?

Mr. Cochran-Yes, sir, and on page 23 of the Congressional Manual, it says "the common practice is to allow the minority to submit their views in writing, which shall be printed with the majority report." But I do not think it necessary even to go into the Congressional Manual. We have a manual here, and on page 99 I find here," Minority Report." I find that it is not usually called a report, but is recognized as the views of the minority and goes on to say, that in Congress they are recognized and received with the report of the majority and are printed, postponed or considered in the same manner. I submit that this minority is entitled to some consideration. Up to this time I think we have received but very little, and if we cannot get our views before the Convention in the shape of a minority report it is going to lengthen debate very much. The minority of a committee knows exactly what the points are they desire to have presented, and if we can have those points presented, it will tend to shorten and not lengthen debate.

Mr. McMillan Mr. President, I desire to read for the information of the Convention the rule which the gentleman has just referred to. That refers only to private bills.

The President put the question on Mr. Root's motion to reconsider the vote by which Mr. Osborn's amendment to rule 32 was adopted and it was determined in the affirmative.

The President put the question on Mr. Osborn's amendment to insert after the word "reported" in line 4 of rule 32, the words "by such committees or minorities thereof."

Mr. Root I offer as a substitute for the motion of Mr. Osborn the following: Add at the end of rule 32 "all constitutional amendments proposed by a minority report from any committee shall be printed and placed upon the files of the members of the Convention."

Mr. Osborn-Mr. President, in view of the explanation of the chairman of the Committee on Rules that the amendments proposed by minorities shall be considered in Committee of the Whole, I will accept the substitute.

The President - Mr. Osborn having accepted Mr. Root's substitute, the question is on the amendment of Mr. Root.

The President put the question on the amendment of Mr. Root and it was determined in the affirmative.

Mr. Peck - Mr. President, I have an amendment. After the word "printed" insert "unless the proposed constitutional amendment shall have been on the files of the members for at least one Convention day or shall have been read in full from the desk of the Secretary." That is to be added at the end of the second paragraph. My former motion was voted down for the reason that it was thought that it might be used for the purpose of obstruction. The real purpose of my amendment is such that I believe it should be in some form adopted; that is, that this Convention should have some opportunity of knowing what constitutional amendments were before it on any particular subject, before they were placed on general orders, and therefore, I have now amended the rule, in addition. making it alternative either that it shall have been one day on our desks or read from the desk of the Secretary, so that we shall know what is before the Convention.

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Mr. Root Mr. President, may I inquire what it is that the gentleman wishes to have upon the desks?

Mr. Peck - The proposed constitutional amendments, or I now make it in the alternative that it shall have been read from the desk of the Secretary.

Mr. Griswold - Mr. President, if an amendment is in order, I would propose to strike out the words "unless the amendment is read in full."

Mr. Durfee - Mr. President, it seems to me that if this amendment comes in at the close of the second paragraph that it refers to the majority report of a committee and prevents the reference of that report to a Committee of the Whole, unless it has been on the files of the members for at least one day.

Mr. Peck—Or read from the desk of the Secretary, so that we shall know what it is.

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Mr. Durfee Mr. President, I would like to ask the mover of the amendment whether it is his desire that the majority report of a committee shall be on the files of the members or read from the desk before it goes to the Committee of the Whole?

Mr. Peck - That the committee shall not report until the proposed amendments have been printed and placed upon the desks of the members one day, or read from the Secretary's desk, so that the Convention may know in some form what proposed amendments are before it, at the time of sending the report to general orders.

Mr. Durfee- Then I would suggest to the gentleman that the purpose of his amendment would not be accomplished by it if it were adopted. That part of the rule will then read as follows:

"All proposed amendments reported shall, if the report be received, be committed to the Committee of the Whole and immediately printed unless the proposed constitutional amendment shall have been on the files of the members for at least one Convention day, or shall have been read in full from the desk of the Secretary."

Mr. Peck Mr. President, the rule as it now stands, provides for the printing of these proposed amendments instead of reading in full from the desk. That was accepted by the Committee on Rules.

Mr. Durfee - If the amendment goes in at the close of the first paragraph it would not have that effect, but I understood the President to say that the amendment was intended to follow the second paragraph.

Mr. Root I think it makes the rule wholly unintelligible.

The President — The Chair apprehends that there will be confusion upon the adoption of this amendment unless it is ascertained. where it comes in. Will Mr. Peck state now definitely where he wants his amendment to go in.

Mr. Peck At the end of the first sentence of rule 32.

Mr. Veeder - Mr. President, may I ask a question why it should remain there and on the files of the members before it is referred to a standing committee? This amendment provides that it shall not go to a committee until it is printed. It seems to me that my friend has made a mistake in the location of his amendment.

The President put the question on Mr. Peck's amendment and it was determined in the negative.

Mr. Veeder Mr. President, I move to amend the last paragraph of the rule by striking out all after the word "had" and insert the matter which the Secretary will please read.

The Secretary read the amendment as follows: Amend rule 32 by striking out all after the word "had" in next to last line and insert in lieu thereof the words "a reasonable time to consider the same."

Mr. Root Mr. President, may I ask the gentleman from Kings if he will be good enough to offer his amendment so that it will apply only to the printed matter. There has been a clause added.

Mr. Veeder Mr. President, this provision of the rule, as I understand it, is that no standing or select committee shall be discharged from the consideration of a proposition referred to it

unless the committee has had a meeting subsequent to such reference. The object is to allow the committee a reasonable time to consider it, and then if they do not agree to it, they may be discharged.

Mr. Root Mr. President, I will agree to that, although I would like to have the language changed.

Mr. Becker- Mr. President, I desire to offer an amendment to Mr. Veeder's amendment. Strike out the last clause of rule 32, “no standing or select committee shall be discharged from the consideration of a proposed amendment referred to it until the committee has had a meeting subsequent to such reference." As this rule now stands, it would be in the power of a standing committee, or what is perhaps liable to be far more dangerous, in the hands of a select committee appointed by the Chair or otherwise to delay any action whatever by the Convention until in its discretion it has had a meeting. Even as amended by my friend from Brooklyn (Mr. Veeder), as proposed to be amended by his amendment, it would always be doubtful what was a reasonable time. We know, those of us who are lawyers, how often both courts and juries have difficulty with that question. It seems to me that it ought to be in the power of this Convention at any time to discharge a committee from a report, even if it was five minutes after the matter had been referred to the committee, and send it to another committee. I do not believe in placing in the hands of a committee any option to delay on any matters which have been referred to that committee. Suppose that a question has been referred to a committee. A motion is then made to discharge that committee from further consideration. How easy for members of the committee or some person interested to explain that it should not be discharged on the ground that the committee had not had a reasonable time. On the other hand, there may be reasons why, notwithstanding any explanation which may be made, it is required in the business of the Convention that whatever might be referred to any committee might at any time, in the discretion of the Convention, be taken out of its hands and the committee be discharged from further consideration. I think the best way to get at that is to strike out this whole provision and leave it to the Convention to say how long any matter should remain in any committee. I do not believe in tieing up the action of the Convention by an arbitrary iron-bound rule of this character, so that the Convention cannot have control over its business at any time.

Mr. Veeder Mr. President, I accept Mr. Becker's amendment.

Mr. Root Mr. President, that is perfectly satisfactory to me. Rule 25 already provides that the Convention can discharge a committee at any time.

Mr. Veeder

The President put the question on Mr. Becker's amendment to strike out the last clause of rule 32, and it was determined in the affirmative.

Mr. Vedder Mr. President, I offer an amendment that the word "received" be stricken out and the words "agreed to" be inserted in place thereof. The words "agreed to" are known to all legislative bodies. A report may be received when it is in the hands of a secretary, but it may not be agreed to until the report has been considered by the Convention.

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Mr. McClure Mr. President, I would like to ask if "agreed to" disposes of this matter?

Mr. Vedder - Not at all. What I mean is this. If a committee reports that they are in favor of the passage of a certain amendment and that is agreed to, it goes to the Committee of the Whole. If the committee report a proposition adversely, and that is agreed to, that ends it, because it was adverse to the consideration of it. You will find in the rules of the Assembly that the words "agreed to" are used in this connection.

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Mr. McClure Mr. President, it seems to me that the word which appears in the rule is the most acceptable. We understand what the receiving of a committee's report is, that the Convention takes it and does with it whatever it deems proper. They may recommit it to the committee which makes the report; they may commit it to the Committee of the Whole or do whatever they deem proper. The words "agreed to " may mean that the report in favor of the amendment is adopted, and that is the end of it, and that it may not go in the Committee of the Whole. I think leaving the plain word "received" there is better. I hope the rule will stand, so far as that word is concerned, as it is.

Mr. Vedder Mr. President, I have simply made the motion because it is in accordance with all rules of legislative bodies. Every favorable report, if agreed to, goes to the Committee of the Whole in every legislative body. It is not the bill which they agree to. It is the amendment which they agree to at that time. It is simply the report of the committee which reported favorably, which means that it shall be committed to the Committee of the Whole. If the report is adverse it means that the committee have reported that it must not go to the Committee of the Whole, and if that is agreed to,

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