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price of fuel, we therefore request our senators and representatives in congress to make all reasonable efforts to secure the passage of laws effectual to prevent such combinations, destroy such monopolies, and put the supply of fuel as nearly as may be beyond the reach of private speculation.

The secretary of the Commonwealth is requested to transmit forthwith a copy of this resolution to each of our senators and representatives.

In Senate, adopted May 13, 1892. In House of Representatives, adopted in concurrence May 19, 1892.

Relating to the immigration of paupers, criminals, etc.

RESOLUTIONS RELATING TO THE IMMIGRATION OF PAUPERS, CRIM

INALS AND DEPENDENT PERSONS. Resolved, That the senate and house of representatives of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, in general court assembled, earnestly and respectfully urge upon the congress of the United States and the executive and legislative departments of the several states, the importance of adopting legislative measures establishing a uniform policy in dealing with immigrants from foreign countries, and persons migrating from state to state, who are dependent upon public or private charity, and are of idle, vicious or criminal habits.

Resolved, That the secretary of the Commonwealth be requested to transmit copies of the foregoing resolution to the presiding officers of both houses of the congress of the United States, to each of the senators and representatives therein from this Commonwealth, and the governors of the several states of the United States.

In Senate, alopted May 13, 1892.

In House of Representatives, adopted in concurrence May 23, 1892.

On the death of
Horace E.
Miller.

RESOLUTIONS UPON THE DEATH OF HORACE E. MILLER, LATE REP

RESENTATIVE FROM THE FOURTH FRANKLIN DISTRICT. Resolved, That the house of representatives learns with sorrow of the death of Horace E. Miller, late a member of this house from the fourth Franklin district;

Resolved, That the house desires to publicly attest its regard for him as a man of great integrity of character and one who had won the respect of all his associates by

his estimable personal traits and the conscientious manner in which he discharged his public duties; and that the house further desires to express its sympathy with the family and friends of the deceased ;

Resolved, That these resolutions be entered at length upon the journal of the house, and that an engrossed copy be transmitted to the family of the deceased.

In House of Representatives, adopted June 16, 1892.

The general court of 1892, during its annual session, passed four hundred and twenty-nine acts and one hundred and six resolves, which received the approval of his excellency the governor. In addition to these the following acts were laid before the governor and failed to receive his approval, but as they were not returned by him, with his objections thereto, within five days after receiving the same, the general court not having adjourned in the meantime, said acts had “ the force of a law,” under the provisions of the Constitution, and have been so certified, viz. :

An Act to establish the salaries of the justice and clerk of the police court of Marlborough. [Chap 93.)

An Act to establish the salary of the justice of the East Boston district court. [Chap 100 ]

An Act to establish the salaries of the county commissioners for the county of Plymouth. [Chap 298 ]

An Act to establish the salaries of the county commissioners for the county of Essex. [Chap 351]

An Act to incorporate the Roxbury Trust Company. [Chap 394.] An Act to incorporate the Beacon Trust Company. [Chap. 395.] An Act to incorporate the West Lynn Trust Company. [Chap. 396.]

An Act to incorporate the Essex County Safe Deposit and Trust Company [Chap 397.]

An Aci to incorporate the Plymouth County Safe Deposit and Trust Company. [Chap. 398]

An Act to establish the salaries of the county commissioners for the county of Norfolk (Chap 399.]

An Act to incorporate the Columbia Trust Company: [Chap. 400.]

Six acts, entitled respectively, “ An Act to establish the salary of the justice of the fourth district court of eastern Middlesex”, Act to establish the salary of the justice of the police court of Willianistown ", " An Act to authorize the Connecticut River Railroad Company to increase its capital stock ”, “ An Act to permit the sale of trout artificially raised in this Commonwealth, between the fifteenth day of January and the first day of April in each year ”, “ An Act to authorize the city of Woburn to appoint a superintendent of public buildings " and "- An Act to establish Fire District Number One in the town of Webster" were passed and laid before the governor for his approval and were returned by him with his objections thereto, to the branch in which they respectively originated; were reconsidered, agreeably to the provisions of the constitution, and the vote being taken on passing the same, notwithstanding the objections of the governor thereto, they were rejected, two thirds of the members present and voting thereon not having voted in the affirmative.

An

“An Act to promote temperance by the suppression of the liquor saloon and tippling shop", was laid before the governor for his approval and was returned by him to the house of representatives, the branch in which it originated, with his objections thereto; was reconsidered and passed, notwithstanding the objections of the governor thereto, two thirds of the members present and voting thereon having voted in the affirmative. The act was thereupon sent to the senate, was reconsidered, and the vote being taken on passing the same, notwithstanding the objections of the governor thereto, it was rejected, two thirds of the senators present and voting thereon not having voted in the affirmative.

The general court was prorogued on Friday, June 17, at 12.46 A.M. the session having occupied one hundred and sixty-three days.

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At twelve o'clock on Thursday, the seventh day of January, his excellency the governor, accompanied by his honor the lieutenant governor, the members of the executive council, and officers of the civil and military departments of the government, attended by a joint committee of the two houses, met the senate and house of representatives, in convention, and delivered the following:

ADDRESS.

Gentlemen of the senate and house of representalives.

Profoundly grateful to the people of the Commonwealth for the renewed confidence which has again entrusted me with important public duties, I enter upon their discharge by bmitting to you such suggestions and recommendations as seem to merit your consideration and action.

This privilege of addressing the legislature, accorded the governor by long established custom, is not, in my judgment, best used in a perfunctory statement of the recommendations of the various departments of the Commonwealth, all of which are set forth fully in their reports

I believe it better to make this the occasion for a broader treatment of public questions, for giving expression to the people's wishes and wants, and for suggestion to the legislature, and through it to the public, of any policy or reform which seems to the governor wise and necessary, and for which he is ready to assume responsibility. Department recommendations can be called to your attention in a later message, if necessary,

to you.

with such endorsement or criticism as they suggest. This course separates more clearly the views of the executive and of the departments, and gives to both greater emphasis and responsibility. It requires the chosen representative of the people, as his first duty, to submit to you their opinion, indicated by their votes, upon such public matters within your jurisdiction as demand your attention. So will elections mean a choice between principles and measures rather than between

men.

The close dependence of the people upon their state government, the great and immediate control it exercises over them and their liberty, property and welfare, make the duty imperative of keeping that government efficient and responsible in its work, and of adopting any changes or reforms necessary to this end. With the tendency each year to increase its duties and to multiply its subjects, and thus to enlarge its power over public and individual interests, the greater is the necessity that this power should be restrained by such official responsibility as will keep it well within the control of the people, and make every administrative officer answerable to them. “ The first requisite of efficient administration,” says an experienced writer, “is power with responsibility to a constituency which can readily call it to account.” Machinery of government which worked easily and well when its duties were comparatively few and simple, may be too cumbersome to meet its many and complicated duties of later days, and entirely inadequate to bring the government, now more and more felt by the people, within their control. Faithful and efficient service may make a bad system work well, or mitigate its lack of responsibility ; but sound administration cannot permanently be had under such conditions, nor until the system itself is changed and corrected.

In my judgment the time has come when the attention of the legislature ought to be directed to the executive branch of our government, to the great increase of its duties, the lack of uniformity or system in the organization created for their discharge, and its entire absence of responsibility, except in the high character and conscientious service of officials in its various departments. My criticism is not of officials, but of a system ; and the test of that system is not the faithful work which they have

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