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A STAND OF SECOND GROWTH NEAR AXTON, N. Y.

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EDUCATION AND CO-OPERATION OF PUBLIC If you can get together and develop these ideas and propositions, with due consideration for the public interests, and enlisting the public with you in your eflorts, through a campaign of educa. tion and publicity, so that they will co-operate with you, and harmonizing those tuo views of it—the purely economic and the sentimental and the idea of using the forests for pleasure and recreation purposes, you will then have an economic field of great value. That is the endeavor of the National Forestry Association. Thank you. (Applause.)

THE TOASTMASTER: This concludes our program, gentlemen. I want to thank you all, individually and collectively, who have helped us in our program, which has been most admirable and interesting and instructive; and I wish to thank you all for your attendance here, and to thank each member of the Association for the support which he has given our work during the past year, and I trust we may count upon your support in even greater measure during the coming year in our endeavors to accomplish the things which we have set our heart on. (Applause.)

AN APPRECIATION MR. W. L. Sykes: Just a moment, Mr. Toastmaster, before we adjourn. I like bouquets. I heard Billy Sunday say once that he would rather have a rose-bud given him while he was living than a whole bunch of flowers piled on his bier when he was dead.

Now I don't know whether there is anything the matter with me or not (Voice: You're all right.) but I have never attended a meeting of this Association when I felt there was so much good common sense talked as there has been at our meetings here today and this evening,-so much good, sound hard thought that meant something in a practical way; and I believe we ought to—and that we all will go away from here feeling that we have made a big advance. I don't know who is responsible for bringing all this about, but I would like to throw a rose-bud at our President. I move that we all throw a rose-bud at the President.

Voice: Fine! Fine!
ANOTHER Voice: I second the motion.

A SPEAKER: Centlemen, you have heard the motion. All in favor of throwing a rose-bud at the President as a testimonial of their appreciation of the part he has taken in furnishing us the

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splendid program we have had here today and this evening, will make it manifest by such action. Let's do it! Ready-Fire! ! (Bombardment of President with rose-buds.)

ALL AGENCIES WORKING TOGETHER MR. SYKES: I am glad Dr. Hall is here. He has attended most of our meetings. I want to say just a word regarding Dr. Hall and the Association for the Protection of the Adirondacks, of which I am also a member. I believe the paper he read here tonight contains many things which we can endorse very heartily. I don't think our Association and the Association Dr. Hall represents are so far apart–certainly not half as far apart as we are with Germany! (Laughter and applause.)

Dr. Hall, I hope you will continue coming to our meetings right along;—and we ought to go to your meetings. We ought to get together on this thing and conserve those Adirondack properties and do the thing that is best to be done in regard to them in a practical manner, looking to the future as well as the present; and let's all get some new ideas into our heads; and you get your Association to come to us—and we will do the same with youfor conferences, so we may all get together on this thing. And I want to suggest that we both prevent fellows trying to slip in and put something over that neither of our Associations want, at Albany. Let us do this, in the interest of the public and ourselves.

We are all a part of the people of the State of New York, and I have always taken the position that the mother of a baby knows pretty nearly as well what to do with it as a wet nurse that is hired somewhere else! (Laughter and applause.) Professor Recknagel has shown that we have a child of our own and that we are jointly interested in it, and we ought to co-operate in helping to spank it; and I think we ought to get along together in the same back yard harmoniously and act together in our policy as to what is to be done regarding what we own and the State owns. (Applause.)

The TOASTMASTER: I think Professor Recknagel is entitled to "fifty-fifty" on the success of this meeting. He has rendered most efficient assistance from the start, and he is certainly entitled to a large share of the roses. Gentlemen, the meeting stands adjourned.

APPENDIX

CONSTITUTION OF THE EMPIRE STATE

FOREST PRODUCTS ASSOCIATION

ARTICLE I Section 1. This association shall be known as "Empire State Forest Products Association.”

Objects. Section 2. The objects of this association shall be to promote the interests of its members; to protect, perpetuate and increase the forest growth of the state through the establishment of a rational and constructive system of forestry; the conservation and development of water power in the State of New York, and to promote friendly intercourse between the members, and to co-operate with others interested in like objects.

ARTICLE II

Membership. Section 1. Every person, firm or corporation owning forest land or engaged in the industries of manufacturing or shipping lumber, wood pulp, and paper, and other forest products, or in the establishment of a rational system of forestry or in the conservation and development of water power in the State of N. Y., who shall be duly elected by the Board of Directors of the association, and shall pay the initiation fee herein fixed, within 30 days thereafter, shall become a member of the association.

Section 2. Any member may resign from the association by delivering his written resignation to the secretary; such resignation in no case to become effectual until 20 days after it is received by the secretary and the payment to the association of all dues and assessments falling due before the expiration of such 30 days, together with all dues and assessments that were levied before the receipt of such resignation by the secretary.

ARTICLE III Section 1. The affairs of this association shall be managed by a board of seven directors, six of whom with the president and vicepresident shall be elected at the annual meeting of the association, who shall serve one year or until their successors are elected. Any duly authorized representative of any corporation or firm, which is a member of this association, shall be eligible as a director, or officer. The president shall be ex-officio a member of the Board of Directors.

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