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time to time. Though words are irrevocable, yet the last corrections of any author should be considered as the sense which he wishes to express, or to enforce. Impertinence and fallhood I have at all times despised and neglected. It will be seen however, that, by omissions and alterations, I have expressed a liberal concern for my unintentional mistakes, with the spirit and breeding of a gentleman.

Additions made to a history, or to any professed work of science, may (if it be thought worth the trouble) be printed separately. But- in a compofition of this nature, a moment's consideration will suggest to any man, that it is impracticable.

The following, or similar, words are recorded to have been once delivered in Parliament a few years before the Rebellion in 1745. I sha!! apply the spirit of them to the enemies of the principles of this work, but not to the enemies of the work itself. The words are these : " The

" heat which has offended them is the ardour of

6 convi&tion,

time to time. Though words are irrevocable, yet the last corrections of any author should be considered as the sense which he wilhes to express, or to enforce. Impertinence and fallhood I have at all times despised and neglected. It will be seen however, that, by omiffions and alterations, I have expressed a liberal concern for my unintentional mistakes, with the spirit and breeding of a gentleman.

[iii] “ conviction, and that zeal for the service of

my country, which neither hope nor fear shall “ influence me to suppress. I will not fit un“ concerned when (PUBLICK) LIBERTY is threat“ ened or invaded, nor look in silence upon

(intended) PUBLICK ROBBERY. I will exert

my endeavours, at whatever hazard, to drag “ the aggressors to justice, whoever may protect

WHOEVER MAY (ULTIMATELY) “ PARTAKE OF THE (NATIONAL) PLUNDER!"

" them, AND

Additions made to a history, or to any professed work of science, may (if it be thought worth the trouble) be printed separately. But in a compofition of this nature, a moment's consideration will suggest to any man, that it is impracticable.

It is remarkable: the Speaker was WILLIAM PITT; the Reporter SAMUEL JOHNSON.

See Dr. Johnfon’s Parliamentatary Debates in 1941.

Vol. 1. p. 307

The following, or fimilar, words are recorded to have been once delivered in Parliament a few

March 30, 1798.

THE

years before the Rebellion in 1745. I fha!! apply the spirit of them to the enemies of the principles of this work, but not to the enemies of the work itself. The words are these: The 6. heat which has offended them is the ardour of

conviction,

!

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I RECOMMEND the following anecdote to fagacious persons, who know all authors (and me among the rest) by their style, or by any other certain, or infallible sign. The anecdote is known to those who are accurately versed in literary history. Julius Scaliger wrote and published an oration, without his name, against the celebrated tract by Erasmus, cailed Ciceronianus. Erasmus, having perused it, immediately, (and upon convi&tion as he thought), fixed upon Hieronimus Aleander, who was afterwards made an Archbishop by Leo X. and a Cardinal by Pope Paul the Third, as the author of the whole, or of the greatest part of it, by signs which he conceived to be certain and infallible. These signs were strong indeed. His phraseology, his manner of speaking, his peculiar di&ion, his habits of life, and even the very intercourse which Erasmus had daily with him. Nay, his genius and disposition were so evident, that Aleander A

could

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could not be more intimately known to himself, than he was to Erasmus. YET ERASMUS WAS

MISTAKEN ENTIRELY. His judgment and sagacity will not be questioned. But hear his own words, for on such an occasion, as the present, they are particularly remarkable.

66 Ex s phrasi, ex ore, ex locutione, aliisque compluribus, mihi

persuasi hoc opus, maximâ saltem ex parte, esse Hiera " onimi Alexandri. Nam mihi Genius illius ex domestico “ convidu adeo cognitus perfpe&tusque est, ut ipse sibi non

poflit esse notior !! (a)"

I recommend this anecdote to the confideration of those persons who, from random conjecture, without any knowledge, or any proof whatsoever, continue to ascribe the following work to men, who ate all equally guiltless of my labours, and all equally ignorant of my intentions. But I believe, no gentleman to whom it either has been, or may hereafter be, liberally or illiberally attributed, will so far forget his character, as to appropriate my composition to himself.

“ The Town's enquiring yet;" and will enquire, as I think, for a long time.

I am of opinion, that if the Poem is read once without reference to the notes, the plan, connection, and manner of it will be perceived. I may add, that, The Firit Dialogue was first published in May 1794, the Second and Third in June 1796, and the Fourth in July 1797.

(a) Erasmi Epist. 370. C. 1955. Op. Fol. Ed. Opt. Lugd.

AN INTRO.

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