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THE BIBELOT is issued monthly, beautifully printed on white laid paper, uncut, old style blue wrapper, in size a small quarto, (5 x 6), 24 to 32 pages of text, and will be sent postpaid on receipt of subscription. Remit (preferably) by P. O. Money Order. Librarians will do well to have one or more sets of The Bibelot on file before the early numbers are advanced in price.

THE BAKER & TAYLOR CO.,

5 and 7 East Sixteenth Street, New York,

MAKE

AKE a specialty of supplying public, private, and school LIBRARIES, for which they have exceptional facilities through their connection with many of the largest houses as special agents, and by carrying the stock of all American Publishers.

SITUATIONS WANTED.

WANTED.-A position as librarian, by a woman having four years' practical experience in library work. Competent to take charge. Address D., care of LIBRARY JOURNAL.

They are pleased to give estimates at lowest rates on lists of proposed purchases, and solicit correspondence with Librarians and other bookbuyers.

This house is characterized by its Promptness, Carefulness, and Low Prices.

CATALOGUER. Gentleman with upwards of ten years' experience in bibliographical work, and who has taken a special course in the Library School, wants position as cataloguer in a university or other large library. Holds at present such position in large library in New York. Position in charge of catalogue preferred. Cataloguing acquaintance with most European languages; familiar with European literature; specialist in the literature of philology, natural sciences, and social science. A. J., care of LIBRARY JOURNAL.

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There will be sent to any address on application a topically arranged General Library List selected from the books of all publishers.

The Reference Catalogue

Of Current (English) Literature.

1 VOL., HALF BOUND, NET, $3.50. (Subject to raise in price.)

The new edition of the above (the English publishers' trade list) for 1894 is larger and more complete than any former issue. The Index, also, is much more copious, containing about 90,000 entries. Orders for the United States will be supplied by

The Office of THE PUBLISHERS' WEEKLY,

59 Duane Street), New York.

The
Annual
Literary Index,

1894,

complements the "Annual American Catalogue" of books published in 1894, by indexing (1) articles in periodicals published in 1894; (2) essays and book-chapters in composite books of 1894; (3) authors of periodical articles and essays; (4) special bibliographies of 1894; (5) authors deceased in 1894, and, in its special features, supplements "Poole's Index to Periodical Literature, 1887-'92," and the "A. L. A. Index to General Literature."

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ESTABLISHED 1872

LONDON:

PARIS:

30 WELLINGTON ST., STRAND. 76 RUE DE RENNES.

LEIPZIG:

HOSPITAL STR. 10.

GUSTAV E. STECHERT Purchasing Agent for Colleges & Libraries

810 BROADWAY, NEW YORK,

(TWO DOORS ABOVE GRACE CHURCH)

begs to call attention to his facilities for obtaining FOREIGN BOOKS and PERIODICALS at more economical rates THAN ANY OTHER HOUSE IN AMERICA OR EUROPE can offer, because:

He employs no Commission Agents, but has his own offices and clerks at London, Paris and Leipzig. He has open accounts with all the leading publishing houses in the world.

His experience enables him to give information at once about rare and scarce books.

He receives weekly shipments from England, France and Germany, and can thereby fill orders in quicker time.

MORE THAN 200 LIBRARIES FAVOR HIM WITH THEIR ORDERS.

SPECIAL REFERENCES,

"Mr. Stechert has for years furnished this Library with most of its periodicals and European books, and has bought for us many thousand volumes. Mr. Stechert's success is due to his constant personal attention to the business, and the reasonable terms he is able to offer. I consider a New York agent far preferable to reliance on foreign agents alone.'

GEO. H. BAKER, Librarian of Columbia College, New York.

"Seven years ago, in reorganizing the Columbia College library, I spent much time in trying to discover how to get our foreign books and periodicals with the least delay, trouble and expense. The result of the comparison of three methods, viz: ordering direct from foreign dealers, ordering through one agent in London, or ordering through one agent in New York showed us that it was to our advantage to give Mr. Stechert all our foreign orders, as he delivered in the library in a single package and with a single bill at as low cost as we were able with vastly greater trouble, to get a half dozen different packages in different bills from different places. In reorganizing the New York State Library, I opened the whole question anew, and the result of the comparison was the same as before, and we find that the library gets most for the time and money expended by taking advantage of Mr. Stechert's long experience, and the careful personal attention which he gives to our orders."

MELVIL DEWEY, Director of N. Y. State Library, Albany, N. Y.

"Mr. G. E. Stechert of New York has served us with fidelity in procuring English, French and German books, both new and second hand and also periodicals. His terms are more reasonable than any others that have come to our notice, while he has always guarded our interests very carefully. We find it a great convenience to have one agency in New York, represented by branches in different European countries."

Prof. ARTHUR H. PALMER, Librarian of Adelbert College, Cleveland, O.

"Your methods and facilities for doing business, as I have examined them here as well as at the Leipzig and London ends, seem to me admirably progressive and thoroughly live. I deal with you because I judge it for the advantage of this library to do so. If I did not, I should not. Up to date I am unable to find a method which is, all things included, so economical of time and money as dealing through you.'

ERNEST C. RICHARDSON, Librarian of College of New Jersey, Princeton, N. J.

"Our library committee speaks in the highest terms of your services. You have not only saved us many dollars, but have shown an intelligent appreciation of our wants for which we thank you.'

""

A. 8. COLLINS, Act. Librarian of Reynolds Library, Rochester, N. Y.

GUSTAV E. STECHERT,

LONDON. PARIS. LEIPZIG. NEW YORK.

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YEARLY SUBSCRIPTION, $5.00.

AUGUST, 1895

THE TRAINING OF LIBRARY EMPLOYES, III. - Adelaide R. Hasse.

THE

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PAGE

265

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Contents

266

279

A CLASSIFICATION OF MUNICipal Literature.
G. S. Josephson. . . . .
THE CATALOG OF THE ROYAL LIBRARY AT BERLIN. 279
BINDERY NOTES.
280

267

270

272

274

NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY SCHOOL.
Closing Exercises, 1894 - 95.

STATE LIBRARY ASSOCIATIONS.
Massachusetts Library Club.

REVIEWS.

A. L. A. Pub. Section, List of Books for Girls and Women.

Bierstadt, Library of Robert Hoe.

Larned, History for Ready Reference, v. 5.
Nörrenberg, Die Volksbibliothek.

LIBRARY ECONOMY AND HISTORY..

GIFTS AND BEQUESTS..

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PAGE

281

MONTHLY NUMBERS, 50 cts.

Price to Europe, or other countries in the Union, zos, per annum ; single numbers, as.

Entered at the Post-Office at New York, N. Y., as second-class matter.

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NEW YORK

PUBLICATION OFFICE, 59 Duane Street.

LONDON: SOLD BY KEGAN PAUL, TRENCH, TRÜBNER & Co., PATERNOSTER HOUSE, CHARING CROSS ROAD.

292

The Rudolph Indexer and Indexer Books.

A Boon Especially for Librarians and Booksellers,

ALSO FOR

Large Newspapers, Official Recorders, Abstract Firms, Publishers, Courts of Law-in short, for all purposes where it is necessary to keep alphabetical lists of names to which new names are constantly being added.

The only competitor of the RUDOLPH INDEXER SYSTEM is the OLD CARD CATALOGUE which was adopted about 40 years ago. Can you think of anything else in which there has been no improve ment in 40 years?

Time saved over card system, say three-fourths.

Money saved over card system, say two-thirds.

Patience saved over the card system, beyond computation.

Compare looking for a word and its meaning in an Unabridged Dictionary, and for the same word in the latest Card Index drawer, and you have about the difference between the old card system and the Rudolph Indexer.

PLEASE Send for CATALOGUE AND PRICES.

THOMAS KANE & CO.,
137 Wabash Avenue, Chicago.

THE LIBRARY JOURNAL

VOL. 20.

AUGUST, 1895.

THE board of women managers of the Cotton the broadening of its physical environment there States and International Exposition, which is to will also be a broadening of the spirit of adopen in Atlanta in September next, has appoint- ministration. It would seem that even before ed a committee, of which Anne Wallace is chair- the present library is completely finished, the woman, with special reference to library rela-present congestion should be relieved by occupytions. This committee desires to make a model ing the space which is practically ready, and it library a feature of the exposition and it has may be suggested also that it would be very fitbeen suggested that it would be proper for ting should room be found in the basement of the Bureau of Education to loan the model li- the new building for handling the government brary collected by the A. L. A. and exhibited documents during the trying period when the in Chicago in 1893. Whether or not this be vast accumulation stored here and there throughpracticable, it is very desirable that this oppor- out Washington has to be sorted, distributed, tunity should be utilized to call the attention of or otherwise disposed of. Mr. Spofford has a the South to the importance of the public li- splendid opportunity before him to do a large brary movement. With the exception of the public service by making the most of his new Howard Library in New Orleans, there have been building at the earliest possible date, and we few evidences that the South has caught the trust he will not fail to improve it. spirit of the modern library movement. There is no part of the country in which public progress could be better served by a development of free libraries than in the South, and it is to be hoped that all possible co-operation will be given to Miss Wallace, who is the librarian of the Young Men's Library of Atlanta, to show to the South what advantages may be gained by a local free library in each important centre of population.

It has been generally understood that the investigation on the part of the Treasury Department of the affairs of the Library of Congress implies no reflection upon Mr. Spofford, except a failure to keep the accounts of the library in the accurate shape required by government routine. As the Publishers' Weekly has said "Mr. Spofford has always made the mistake of acting as his own office boy — or mailing clerkoverlooking the fact that no executive in charge of such extensive machinery as that of the library of Congress and the Copyright Office must be, can afford to do his own detail work." This investigation is, however, doing some service in calling public attention to the fact that the methods of the Library of Congress are not fully up to the times. Now that the new building is nearly ready for occupancy, there will be no longer the old reason for that library falling below the modern standards of administration and usefulness, and it is to be hoped that with

No. 8

THE work done by the University of the State of New York in furthering library development in that state is admirably set forth by Mr. Eastman in the present issue of the JOURNAL. New York has never ranked with Massachusetts and other New England states in number of libraries; but the work accomplished by the regents within the past three or four years has brought it to the front in organization and efficiency. In that time they have succeeded in establishing an excellent standard for the libraries of the state, in largely awakening public interest in the subject, in reorganizing somnolent institutions and in establishing libraries in many cities and towns. The admirable example that has been set in this special field by Massachusetts, New York, and other states has within the present year had effect on several other states, and this influence will undoubtedly widen and strengthen with time. There is, indeed, a wide field for such influence. State libraries, as a rule, fall much below accepted library standards and fail to utilize the possibilities before them. This has been shown with special force in the compilation of the bibliography of state publications, forming an appendix to the American Catalog of 1890-95. The preparation of this material has been a labor of time and tribulation, and, though there has been a notable improvement over the

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