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YEARLY SUBSCRIPTION, $5.00.

MARCH, 1895

R. R. Bowker.

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Contents

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SOME LIBRARIes of the NorTHWEST.

(Illustrated).

77 THE COLLATING OF LIBRARY BOOKS. — W: I. Fletcher. 80 Co-OPERATION IN THE CATALOGING OF SCIENTIFIC

LITERATURE.

·

A CARD Catalog of Scientific Literature.

A GREAT PUBLIC LIBRARY FOR NEW YORK CITY.
THE MASSAChusetts State Library.
CRERAR LIBrary to be a Library of Science.
THE MILWAUKEE PUBLIC LIBRARY BUILDING.

THE AUTOTYPE REPRODUCTION OF GREEk, Latin,
AND OTHER MANUSCRIPTS.
ADVERTISING a Library.-J. C. Dana.

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No. 3.

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AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION.

Seventeenth Conference, Denver, Aug. 12-18,

1895.
State Library Section.

NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY SCHOOL.
Saint Valentine.

Library School Examinations.

STATE LIBRARY ASSOCIATIONS.

Connecticut Library Association.
Pennsylvania Library Club.
Ohio Library Association.
Wisconsin Library Association.
Iowa Library Society.

LIBRARY CLUBS.

New York Library Club.
Chicago Library Club.

LIBRARY ECONOMY AND HISTORY.

GIFTS AND BEQUESTS.

LIBRARIANS.

CATALOGING AND CLASSIFICATION.
BIBLIOGRAFY.

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Price to Europe, or other countries in the Union, zos, per annum ; single numbers, as.
Entered at the Post-Office at New York, N. Y., as second-class matter.

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MONTHLY NUMBERS, 50 cts.

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NEW YORK: PUBLICATION OFFICE, 28 ELM STREET (Near Duane). LONDON: SOLD BY KEGAN PAUL, Trench, TRÜBNER & Co., PATERNOSTER HOUSE,

CHARING CROSS ROAD.

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Established 1785.

BY APPOINTMENT,

General Agents in Europe for many Public Institutions in America, for the Imperial Public Library in St. Petersburg, etc.

Stock of about half a million of second-hand volumes in all branches of literature. Systematic catalogues issued regularly and sent post free on application.

Old and new books supplied at best terms and forwarded by quickest and cheapest routes. Cheap and durable bindings for libraries.

LAST ACQUISITION:

The Library of the late Sir Charles Thomas Newton, Keeper of the Greek and Roman Antiquities, and Chief Editor of the Ancient Greek Inscriptions in the British Museum, author of "Discoveries at

Halicarnassus," etc., etc.

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This splendid library is one of the most complete collections of books on classical archæology ever offered for sale. We intend to sell it in one lot. Catalogue in preparation. Buyers are requested to apply.

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LAST CATALOGUES OF SECOND-HAND BOOKS PUBLISHED:

No. 305, 311, 312, 317, 318, 325. Library of Prof. W. von Lexer. (Germanische Sprachen und deutsche Literatur, 7200 items.)

319, 322, 323. Library of Prof. Wilhelm Lübke. (Archæology, Fine Arts, Industrial Arts, 5000 items.)

328, 329, 338. Political Economy (4800 items).

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Telegraphic Address, "Gutenberg."

JOSEPH BAER & CO.,

FRANKFORT O. M. (GERMANY),

BOOKSELLERS AND PUBLISHERS.

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46 339.

The Byzantine Empire, Modern Greece, Turkey, Hungary (1200 items).

340. Library of Prof. O. Feistmantel, of the Indian Survey. (British India and the East

Indian Archipelago; with Appendix on the Gypsies, 1300 items.)

330. Library of Prof. F. Miklosich. (Historia et litteratura Slavorum.)

331. Reference Books, Library Editions, Periodicals and Publications of Learned Societies (1800 items).

332. Library of Prof. F. Noll. (Zoology, 2800 items.)

333. Pedagogical Sciences.

334. History of Costume, Festivals, etc.

335.

336.

337.

History of the Catholic Church, with Appendices on the Reformation and the Jesuits.
Library of Mr. Lucas, Architect of the Cathedral of Mayence. (Christian Art.)
Classical Archæology.

341. Lepidopterology.-342. Geology.-343. Numismatics.

344, 345. Library of Fr. von Bodenstedt. Part I. Literature and History of Russia. Part II. Shakespeare and his time.

346. Botany.

VOL. 20.

THE

LIBRARY

JOURNAL

MARCH, 1895.

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THE finest piece of co-operation in library history is that which has been announced within the month in the proposed consolidation of the library foundations of New York City. The Astor Library, the Lenox Library and the Tilden Trust were each sufficient, in almost any other city than metropolitan New York, to provide adequately for a great library, and it is most creditable to the recent administration of the Lenox Library that this, as well as the Astor Library, has, within its limitations, been put freely at the service of the public. But no one of these individually, with those limiting conditions, could be adequate in New York, while the consolidation of all into the "New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundations," as it is ingeniously proposed to call the new institution, brings everything together into a happy whole. New York will now fairly rival Boston and Chicago as a library city, and we may fairly expect that Brooklyn will take the hint and begin' a like consolidation of its library enterprises. Such a movement has, indeed, been considered in Brooklyn, and one seems also under way in Philadelphia, where the consolidation of the Pepper Free Library with the libraries of the board of education has

led to definite plans for a general consolidation of libraries, so that the spirit of co-operation for which the American Library Association has stood, through so many years, is now bearing most noble fruit. With the several libraries of the New York Free Circulating Library as branches, it is scarcely possible to conceive of a finer system than this new plan for New York outlines, and the greatest credit that is possible within words should be given to the trustees of the several bodies, who have voted to combine the individualities of their several institutions to this grand consummation.

No. 3

ing of scientific books, and the correspondence from the Royal Society, already given in Science, which we reprint elsewhere. There is nothing more wasteful in the whole range of duplication than incomplete and inadequate indexing, where practically complete and adequate work is possible. The Royal Society, which is officially and in practice the leading organization of the scientific world, renders a great service to science and to bibliography in initiating this undertaking, and it is scarcely necessary to appeal to American librarians on their side to do everything possible to promote the success of this admirable plan. We heartily second the peal to publishers to do everything in their power to make the enterprise possible.

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WHILE it is not improper that books in a state library should be to a certain extent at the ser

ANOTHER example of proposed co-operation on a large scale is outlined in the report of the | vice of the citizens of the capital city, and that Harvard University committee on the index- | a state library should thus become in a measure

a local circulating library, this policy is only possible under wise limitations, and it seems to be the general opinion, within and without the New York State Library, that the circulating feature of that library, under its present liberal administration, has cramped too much its value as a reference collection. Both the library profession and the public have reason to know that under Mr. Dewey's administration the most liberal arrangements possible are sure to be made in everything tending towards the accommodation of all kinds of readers, so that if the State Library determines to curtail the use of its books for circulation, it may be taken for granted that it is right in so doing, and that the books are refused for less valuable uses, not that they may stand idle on the shelves but that they may do more important service elsewhere. It is well known to librarians that there is a great growth in the extent to which books are sent from the State Library to the over 500 institutions in the university and to scholars in different parts of the state who have claims on the collection in prosecuting their studies. ́It was inevitable that the State Library, in doing this very important work, should find it necessary to curtail somewhat the merely local and incidental use of books. This curtailment, however, has been greatly exaggerated by the newspapers, as it really amounts to little beyond refusing to supply citizens of Albany with current novels for their recreation.

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that will find rightful place in the Crerar Library of Science. But it is an excellent thing that the trustees have given so broad and wise a construction to the terms of a will that might have been interpreted in a far narrower spirit. They have shown a real appreciation of their responsibility and a desire to use the trust committed to them in such a way as to afford "the greatest good to the greatest number." Their declared intention is to take the term science in its most catholic sense, including not only abstract and technical science, but the science of sociology, of architecture, of astronomy, of art and government, as well as the science of electricity, engineering and mechanics. A library planned on these lines, rightly developed, freely and broadly administered, would be a boon not only to the city possessing it, but to scholars, students, and investigators throughout the country-and such a library it is within the power of the Crerar trustees to establish.

THERE has been a most gratifying development along the lines of library progress since the new year. Vermont has now a state library commission and a state association, both of which are doing effective work, Wisconsin is about to join the ranks of states possessing library commissions, in Ohio a state library association has just been formed, with a large membership and larger supply of enthusiasm, and a bill is pending in the Pennsylvania legislature providing for the establishment of libraries in THE announcement that the trustees of the every school district of the state. Each of these John Crerar Library have determined to estab- movements has been the direct result of active lish a scientific reference library is of very gen- and persevering effort on the part of A. L. A. eral interest. The decision has come as some- workers, and two of them, at least, had their inthing of a surprise, for though it was understood ception at the Lake Placid Conference. It is that no attempt would be made to enter the not to be expected that this rate of progress will general" field, so fully occupied by the Chi- be continued during the year-that were too cago Public Library, it was believed that the di- millennial a prospect; but there is certainly a rectors were inclined towards Americana or most hopeful promise for the future, and it does religion as the specialty of the library. The not seem unduly optimistic to look forward to choice of science is an admirable one, covering, the time when each state shall have its library as it does, a field that it is practically impossible laws, its library commission, its state association for most libraries to occupy even partially, and and its local library societies. Indeed, in this that is of the utmost use and value to a very large movement every state that joins the library portion of the public. Whether the develop-ranks may be counted twice, once for itself and ment of the library on these lines is entirely in once for its example - for state pride is almost accord with the intention of its founder is another as vital a point as civic pride, and the argument matter; it is probable that Mr. Crerar, who in that a state is behind its sister states in progreshis will forbade the inclusion of " French novels siveness, and especially in educational matters, and all skeptical trash" in his library, would is one of the most powerful levers of public have included in the latter category many books sentiment.

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SOME LIBRARIES OF THE NORTHWEST. By R. R. Bowker.

How large a country and how great a nation | we have in these United States of America is the subject of vast spread-eagle oratory. Perhaps it is more accurate to say was the subject of the large-voiced orator, since both he and his subject have given way in later years to the careful student who is, perhaps, inclined to emphasize the difficulties and dangers of national vastness, rather than to glory indiscriminately and promiscuously in that characteristic feature of our national being. The orator stayed at home and talked; the student travels and observes and reports. But when a hundred such students and observers and reporters crossed the continent in 1891 to visit their library brethren on the Western coast, their journey from the Atlantic to the Pacific opened their eyes and their minds to a serious sense of the largeness and greatness, in the true sense, of the national life, in the best features of which they were becoming so important a part. It was a comfortable surprise to Eastern librarians to find how important and how educational a part in national progress was taken by the librarians of the Pacific coast, whether in the great libraries of San Francisco, the original and pioneer work at Los Angeles, or the modest, but intelligent endeavors of the smaller libraries in the still younger communities scattered through the state of California. But this visit included only California itself, and except that the ubiquitous and industrious Mr. Fletcher found time to make a working missionary visit as far north as Seattle, little has been known by librarians in the East of the library development of the Northwest.

The finest separate library building on the Pacific coast is the home of the Library Association of Portland, Oregon. The site is at the corner of Seventh and Stark streets, a third of a mile back from the Willamette River front, just beyond the high-water mark of the flood of June, 1894, on the river plain, above which rise the picturesque heights of this venerable city of the Pacific coast- already a half century old! It is a noble building, in Romanesque design, of simple and effective lines, occupying a frontage of 144 feet on Stark street, its base of Nelson Island granite with upper walls of light-colored sandstone, surmounted at a height of 50 feet with a tile roof. In design, the façade has some resemblance to the new Boston Public Library building. The

main entrance is through a three-door vestibule, which leads up by a few steps to the main corridor, through which one reaches the main bookroom, handsomely furnished, with stacks effectively arranged on either side, and having the librarian's quarters at one end and the ladies' room at the other. This floor also contains newspaper and magazine rooms and a chessroom. In the basement are accommodations for receiving and handling books. On the second floor is a large memorial hall, which is to be the home of the Portland Art Museum, with lecture-room, reference-room and directors' room. The memorial hall is dedicated to the memory of Miss Ella M. Smith, from whose bequest the edifice was built. She left for this purpose real estate appraised at the time the building was commenced, in 1890, at from $130,000 to $140,ooo, and it was decided to hold this property, borrowing upon its security such money as might be required as the building progressed. This plan proved a profitable one until the crisis of 1893, when values and rentals fell to such an extent as to cause some embarrassment to the Library Association; but the property is still valued as high as $127,000, and the library has surmounted its difficulties fairly well. The new building was finished in 1893, and the books were removed, to the extent of nearly 20,000, in June, 1893, in seven working days. The stack-room contains present accommodations for about 30,000 volumes, and provision can ultimately be made for 120,000 volumes.

The Association was started as a subscription library in 1864, and it was not until 1894 that the dues were reduced from $9 to $5 a year. It had, at the last report, 101 perpetual memberships, 214 half-yearly, 310 monthly, and 36 honorary members. The library had not been opened Sundays, but the directors agreed to provide for Sunday opening if 100 persons would become annual members who had never been members of the Library Association and whose wish was that the library should be open Sunday.

It is pleasant to note that this most important library of the Northwest is under the charge of an active member of the American Library Association and a graduate of the library school of Pratt Institute, and it is also gratifying to record that Mr. Daniel F. W. Bursch, who, in 1893, succeeded Mr. Henry A. Oxen as librarian of

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