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Office.

Commmissioner...
First deputy commissioner.
Deputy commissioner ..
Chief clerk
Assistant chief clerk
Medical referee......
Assistant medical referee..
Law clerk
Chief board of review..
Chief special examination division
Chief old war and navy division..
Chief eastern division
Chief middle division...
Chief western division..
Chief southern division..
Acting chief record division..
Chief certificate division
Chief finance division
Chief stationery division
Acting chief mail division.......
Chief army and navy survivors division
Superintendent of building...

Tennessee.
New Hampshire.
Illinois.
Pennsylvania

Do.

Do.
Nlinois.
Wisconsin.
Illinois.
Missouri.
New Jersey.
Indiana.
Connecticut.
Michigan.
Wisconsin.
Kentucky.
New York.
Michigan.
Florida.
Oregon.
Connecticut.
Pennsylvania.

Name.

Whence appointed.

* Henry Clay Evans... * James L. Davenport. *Leverett M. Kelly.. William H. Bayly. Walter J. Brooks.. *Jacob F. Raub Charles F. Whitney. Stephen A. Cuddy * Ferdinand D. Stephenson Amos B. Casselman.... * Thomas W. Dalton. * Warner Wilhite... Frauk A. Warfield.. * John S. Garrison * Francis H. Allen * Gilbert C. Kniffin *Adolphus B. Bennett Benjamin A. Harlan * John Hancock * T. Mannell Hermann. * Charles W. Filer George W. Barnes

* Served in Union Army or Navy during the civil war.

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Cal

July 18, 1898

July 18, 1898

4, 000 NAVY PENSION FUND,

* Fuller, Jesse B....

TOPEKA, KANS.

* Leland, Cyrus, jr

Kans ... July 20, 1897

July 20, 1897

4,000

WASHINGTON, D. C.

* Willson, Sidney L

N. Y.... Jan. 22, 1885

Feb. 1,1898

4, 000

* Served in Union Army or Navy during the civil war. NotE.- Employees at pension agencies were made subject to the civil-service rules for appointment by the extension of the classification by the President's order of July 15, 1895.

NOTE.-Term of office oxpires four years from " Date of present appointment."

The money accruing to the United States from sale of prizes constitutes a fund, which must remain forever a fund for the payment of pensions to the officers, seamen, and marines who may be entitled to receive the same. The law provides that if such fund be insufficient for the purpose the public faith is pledged to make up the deficiency.

It does not appear that there was any navy pension fund in 1861, but in 1862 it amounted to $1,356,000, and in 1864 to $6,055,585. It now amounts to about $14,000,000. The interest on the fund up to 1868 was more than sufficient to pay navy pensions, and in that year a law was passed reducing the interest on said fund to 3 per cent per annum.

Since 1870 the amount derived from the interest on this fund has been inadequate to pay all navy pensions, and the provision which pledges the public faith to make up the deficiency has been brought into operation since that date.

During the past four years the interest on the navy pension fund available for the payment of navy pensions has been as follows: For 1895

$339, 535 For 1896

340, 685 For 1897

340, 275 For 1898

341, 275 For 1899

342, 275 The amounts paid during said years for navy pensions were as follows: In 1895

$3, 655, 485. 95 In 1896

3,588, 528. 58 In 1897

3, 635, 802. 71 In 1898

3,723, 932. 90 In 1899

3,683, 794.37 It will readily appear that the amount of interest on the navy pen. sion fund made available for the payment of navy pensions during the period above noted was in fact less than 10 per cent of the actual pay. ments made in connection with that branch of the service.

In the naval appropriation act of 1870 it was provided that the present and all future appropriations for the support of the United States Naval Asylum at Philadelphia, Pa., should be charged to and paid from the income of the naval pension fund.

This fund is also charged with the payment of the half-pay allowance made to disabled seamen or marines for twenty years' service, and the allowance made by the Secretary of the Navy to disabled persons who have served in the Navy or Marine Corps for a period of ten years. These allowances are separate from and in addition to any pension to which these persons are entitled under existing laws.

WHO ARE ENTITLED TO PENSIONS.

REVOLUTIONARY WAR.

The act of March 18, 1818, thirty-five years after the termination of the Revolutionary war, was the first general act passed granting a pension for service only. Its beneficiaries were required to be in indigent circumstances and in need of assistance.

About 1820 Congress became alarmed at the large number of applicants for pensions under this act (there were about 8,000), and, on May 1, 1820, passed what has been known as the "alarm act," which required all pensioners then on the roll to furnish a schedule of the amount of property then in their possession. Many of the pensioners whose schedules showed they possessed too much property were dropped from the rolls. Pensioners were dropped who owned as small an amount as $150 worth of property.

On May 15, 1828, or forty-five years after the war, service pension was granted to those who served to the end of the war of the Revolu. tion.

On June 7, 1832, or forty-nine years after the close of the war, a general law was enacted pensioning all survivors who served not less than six months in said war.

On July 4, 1836, being fifty-three years after the termination of the war, an act was passed granting pension for five years to Revolutionary war widows, provided they were married to the soldier or sailor before the close of his last service and that his service was not less than six months.

On July 7, 1838, or fifty-five years after the close of the war, the above act was amended so as to provide where the marriage took place before January 1, 1794.

On July 29, 1848, or sixty-five years after the war, the above laws were amended to include those who were married prior to January 1, 1800.

On February 3, 1853, or seventy years after the war, an act was passed striking out the limitation as to date of marriage.

WAR OF 1812.

The first law granting pension for service in the war of 1812 was passed February 14, 1871, fifty six years after the close of the war. This act required sixty days' service, and widows were not entitled unless they were married to soldier or sailor prior to the treaty of peace, February 17, 1815.

The act of March 9, 1878, sixty-three years after the close of the war, reduced the period of service to fourteen days, and made no limitation as to date of marriage in case of widows.

WAR WITH MEXICO.

On January 29, 1887, thirty-nine years after the close of the war, an act was passed providing for soldiers and sailors and their widows for service of sixty days, if 62 years of age, or disabled or dependent.

INDIAN WARS,

On July 27, 1892, fifty years after period included in the act, pension was provided for those who served thirty days in the Black Hawk, Creek, Cherokee, and Florida war with Seminole Indians from 1832 to 1842 and to their widows.

There has never been any law pensioning widows of soldiers whose death was due to service in time of peace prior to March 4, 1861.

No provision has ever been made for mothers and fathers and brothers and sisters if the death of soldier or sailor resulted from service prior to March 4, 1861.

The laws relating to pension have been more liberal since 1861 than they were prior to that date.

To make it plainer, as an illustration of this fact, I will cite the case of a sailor who lost both arms in the service and line of duty prior to March 4, 1861. He would be entitled to a rating beginning at $3.50 per month and to the various rates provided from time to time to February 12, 1889, when he would receive $100 per month.

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