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LIABILITIES.

Notes or other obligations payable by the institution, secured by real

estate mortgage or deed of trust... Other notes, accounts, or obligations, not contracted for current expenses.

None.
None.

Total liabilities

None.

Net assets

145, 527.66

Receipts and expenditures for the year ending June 30, 1899.

RECEIPTS.

From balance from last year
From private sources.
From appropriation.

Total receipts....

$4, 036. 40 8, 984. 12 6,000.00

19, 020.52

EXPENDITURES. For salaries

3, 108. 19 For medicine, surgical supplies, and instruments

131.08 For repairs to maintain buildings

325. 48 For real estate and permanent improvements.

7, 050.60 For general maintenance not included above.

3,516.06 Total expenditures..

14, 131. 41 Balance in bank June 30, 1899.

4,889, 11 Total balance (including $4,527.66 endowment fund)

4,889. 11 Estimate for appropriation for 1901.

6,000.00 In order to carry on the work of beneficence the board is compelled to ask that the appropriation of $6,000 may be continued for 1900–1. Respectfully submitted by the board of directors.

Z. T. SOWERS, President. The SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR.

HOWARD UNIVERSITY.

BOARD OF TRUSTEES.

Rev. JEREMIAH EAMES RANKIN, D.D., LL.D., President.
Gen. CHARLES H. HOWARD, Chicago, Ill.
Gen. GEORGE W. BALLOCH, A. M., Washington, D.C.
FRANCIS H. SMITH, Washington, D.C.
ZALMON RICHARDS, Washington, D.C.
OTIS F. PRESBREY, New York City.
JOHN F. COOK, Washington, D. C.
Rov. A. F. BEARD, D. D., New York City.
WILLIAM BALLANTYNE, Washington, D.C.
Rev. FRANK J.GRIMKE, D. D., Washington, D.C.
ADAM S. PRATT, Washington, D.C.
Rev. WILLIAM WARING, Washington, D.C.
Hon. JOHN EATON, LL. D., Washington, D.C.
EDWARD M. GALLAUDET, LL. D., Washington, D.C.
Maj. Gen. 0.0. HOWARD, LL. D., Burlington, Vt.
HENRY E. PELLEW, Washington, D.C.
BRAINARD H. WARNER, Washington, D.C.
JAMES H. MERIWETHER, Washington, D.C.
Rev. TEUNIS S. HAMLIN, D. D., Washington, D.C.
Hon. JOHN R. LYNCH, Washington, D.C.
Rev. Bishop BENJAMIN TUCKER TANNER, LL. D., Philadelphia, Pa.
Hon. JOB BARNARD, Washington, D.C.
Rev. CHARLES H. RICHARDS, D. D., Philadelphia, Pa.

THE HONORARY BOARD.

JAMES B.JOHNSON, Washington, D.C.
Rev. DANFORTH B. NICHOLS, M. D., D. D., Yankton, S. Dak.
Hon. WILLIAM B. ALLISON, Dubnque, Iowa.
JOHN A. COLE, Chicago, Ill.
Hon. THOMAS KIRKPATRICK, Lynchburg, Va.
Hon. FRANCIS WAYLAND, New Haven, Conn.
Hon. JOSEPH D.SAYERS, Texas.
S. V. WHITE, Brooklyn, N. Y.
Hon. GEORGE F. HOAR, Massachusetts.
ANDREW LANGDON, New York.
Hon. JOSEPH H. CHOATE, New York.
Hon. GEORGE H. WHITE, M.C., North Carolina.

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE.

Rev. JEREMIAH EAMES RANKIN, D.D., LL.D., President.
Gen. GEORGE W. BALLOCH, LL.D.
JOHN F. COOK.
Rev. WILLIAM WARING.
FRANCIS H. SMITH,

SECRETARY AND TREASURER,

GEORGE H. SAFFORD.

HEADS OF DIFFERENT DEPARTMENTS, 1899–1900.

Rev. JEREMIAH EAMES RANKIN, D.D., LL. D., President.
THOMAS B. HOOD, A. M., M. D., Dean of Medical Department.
B. F. LEIGHTON, LL.D., Dean of Law Department.
Rev. F. W.FAIRFIELD, D. D., Dean of College Department.
GEORGE J.CUMMINGS, A. M., Dean of Preparatory Department.
GEORGE WILLIAM COOK, A. M., Dean of English Department.
LEWIS B. MOORE, Ph. D., Dean of Pedagogical Department.
WILLIAM J. STEPHENS, Musical Director.
CHARLES E. HALL, JOHN F. AKERS, 0. F. N. MADDEN, F. C. LOWEY,

Mrs. B. M. HOWARD, Instructors in Industrial Work.
INT 99—MIS, PT 1-25

385

REPORT

OF THE

PRESIDENT OF HOWARD UNIVERSITY.

HOWARD UNIVERSITY,

Washington, D. C., August 10, 1899. SIR: In compliance with the requirements of the sundry civil bill in connection with the appropriation for Howard University, I have the honor to make the following report, showing “the number of pupils received and discharged during the school year and the number remaining;” “also the branches of knowledge and industry taught and the progress made therein."

For convenience, I render the report by departments.

NORMAL DEPARTMENT.

In the normal department there were enrolled..
Number leaving school of their own accord....

179 35

Number at the close of the school year

144

The department is divided as follows, each class representing one year:

The highest or post-graduate class, the fourth-year class, the thirdyear class, the second-year class, the first-year class, “A” and “B” classes, and the unclassified students.

The following branches are taught in the various classes: Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, reading, spelling, English grammar, English composition, rhetoric, English literature, geography, physical geography, general history, United States history, history of education, science of government, mental science, political economy, civil government, pedagogy, botany, theory and art of teaching, practice in teaching, physics, chemistry, carpentry, printing, tinning, sewing, drawing, stenography, typewriting, Latin, music, bookkeeping, higher arithmetic, astronomy, and physiology.

There is also a practice school, taught by a lady who is a thoroughly educated normal teacher. Her school consists of from 26 to 30 children below any of the established grades of the university, and the advanced pupils of the normal department are required to spend a portion of each day learning how to teach, under her instruction.

This branch of the normal department has been established two years and its success is assured.

With few exceptions, the progress made during the year has been satisfactory and the standard of the school has been raised. Of this the report speaks later.

PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT,

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The preparatory department, which fits students for college, is divided into four classes, each representing one year's study.

In the senior class 14 students entered school. In this class the subjects taught are as follows: Virgil, Anabasis, Iliad, German, English, classics, astronomy, essays, declamations, and discussions during the year.

The middle class entered with 39 students. In this class the following are the subjects taught: Cicero, Greek lessons, physics, chemistry, algebra, English classics, and essays.

In the junior class 17 students were received. The subjects taught are as follows: Cæsar, Latin composition, Greek and Roman history, English classics, geometry, and manual training, such as carpentry, printing, and tinning.

The first year or lowest class entered with 49. Twelve left of their own accord, the number at the end of the year being 37. The subjects taught are as follows: Introductory Latin, algebra, English composition, elementary rhetoric, music, drawing, physiology, manual training four times a week.

There are 8 students pursuing special studies.

The results secured in the year's work have been quite satisfactory in all the branches. The whole number received

127 Number left during the year Number remaining at the end of the year....

115 COLLEGE DEPARTMENT. The college department received at the commencement of the year...

40 Number left during the year

4 Number remaining.

36 These are classified, as in all other American colleges, into seniors, juniors, sophomores, and freshmen.

There are in the senior class 5, of whom 4 graduated with the degree of A. B., and 1 B. S.

The junior class has 3 members, the sophomore class has 3 members, the freshman class has 20 members, and 5 have pursued special studies.

The subjects taught are as follows: Algebra, geometry, trigonometry, analytics, physics, chemistry, geology, zoology, botany, mineralogy, biology, physiology, meteorology, rhetoric, English history, Greek, Latin, French, German, psychology, moral philosophy, natural theol ogy, evidences of Christianity, Constitution of the United States, international law, political economy, and Bible study. The Bible is studied as literature.

There has been within the last year a course of lectures delivered in pedagogy, to which all advanced students in the university who wished to learn that branch and all the teachers of the colored public schools of this city were invited.

MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. In the medical departinent, which includes the dental and pharmaceutical courses, there were at the commencement of the session 160, divided as follows: Candidates for the degree of M. D....

117 Candidates for the degree of D. D. S.

32 Candidates for the degree of Phar. D.

18 Students pursuing special courses...

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