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TREATIES AND LEGISLATION RESPECTING

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TREATIES AND LEGISLATION RESPECTING THEM.

FIRST CONGRESS, THIRD SESSION.

January 27, 1791.

On message of President as to action of France in imposing extra tonnage on vessels of United States, Mr. Morris reported as follows:

Resolved, As the opinion of the Senate, that the fifth article of the treaty of amity and commerce between the United States and His Most Christian Majesty, is merely an illustration of the third and fourth articles of the same treaty, by an application of the principles comprised in the last mentioned articles to the case stated in the former.

Resolved, That the Senate do advise that an answer be given to the court of France, defending in the most friendly manner, this construction in opposition to that urged by the said court.

(Annals, 1st Cong. 1748, 1771; Ex. Jour., pp. 66, 72, 77.)

SECOND CONGRESS, FIRST SESSION.

November 9, 1791.

On the treaty with the Cherokees Mr. Hawkins reported as follows:

That they have examined the said treaty and find it strictly conformable to the instructions given by the President of the United States.

That these instructions were founded on the advice and consent of the Senate, on the 11th of August, 1790.

That the stipulations of the fourteenth article are similar to those gratuitously promised to the Creeks; and although they form an excess to the sum limited in the resolution aforesaid, yet from the beneficial effects likely to be produced thereby, can not be objectionable.

That a new boundary has been arranged, which embraces the people settled to the south of French Broad, and between the same and the ridge which divides the waters running into Little River, and from those running into the Tennessee. That the boundary, in other respects, is nearly the same as that established at Hopewelí.

The committee are therefore of opinion that the Senate advise and consent to the ratification of said treaty. (Ex. Jour., vol. 1, p. 88.)

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December 6, 1791.

On the petition of Charles Colvill and communications in regard to American prisoners in Algiers, Mr. Butler reported as follows:

Resolved by the Senate of the United States, in their capacity as Council of Advice, That if the President of the United States shall enter into any treaty convention for the purpose of establishing and preserving peace with the Regency of Algiers and with Tunis and Tripoli, at an expense not exceeding one hundred thousand dollars annually,” for such a term of years (as) shall be stipulated, and for the purpose of ransoming the citizens of the United States in captivity with the Algerines, “at an expense not exceeding forty thousand dollars for the said ransoin,” the Senate will advise and consent to the same and ratify and approve any measures which the President of the United States shall take for accomplishing these objects to an amount not exceeding five thousand dollars, although such measures should prove unsuccessful.

Resolved, That if a convention or treaty for the establishment and preservation of peace can not be made with the Regency of Algiers the sum of two thousand four hundred dollars annually shall be distributed among the said captives or their families, as they may prefer, in such manner and in such proportion as the President of the United States shall order and direct during their captivity.

Resolved, That the President of the United States be authorized and empowered to draw on the Treasury of the United States for the sum of one hundred and forty-five thousand dollars.

(Annals, 2d Cong., 26; Leg. Jour., pp. 336, 349, 354, 394; Ex.

Jour., vol. 1, p. 91.)

March 15, 1792.

On the message of the President as to treaty with Spain, Mr. Cabot made the following report:

The committee to whom was referred the message of the President of the United States of the 7th instant, with the report of the Secretary of State accompanying the same, stating the reasons for extending the negotiation proposed at Madrid to the subject of commerce, etc., explaining, under the form of instruction, to the commissioners lately appointed to that court the principles on which commercial arrangements with Spain might, if desired on her part, be acceded to on ours, report that it is expedient for the Senate to resolve that they advise and consent to the extension of the powers of the commissioners as proposed, and that they will advise and consent to the ratification of such treaty as the said commissioners shall enter into with the court of Spain in conformity to these instructions.

(Ex. Jour., vol. 1, pp. 110, 115.)

May 5, 1792.

On the message as to treaty with Algiers, Mr. Morris reported as follows:

Resolved, That if the President of the United States shall conclude a treaty with the Government of Algiers for the establishment of peace with them, at an expense not exceeding forty thousand dollars, paid at the signature, and a sum not exceeding twenty-five thousand dollars, to be paid annually afterwards during the continuance of the treaty, the Senate will approve the same; and in case such treaty be concluded, and the President of the United States shall also conclude a convention or treaty with the Government of Algiers for the ransom of the thirteen Americans in captivity there, for a sum not exceeding forty thousand dollars, all expenses included, that the Senate will also approve such convention or treaty.

(Ex. Jour., vol. 1, p. 123.)

THIRD CONGRESS, FIRST SESSION.

June 6, 1794.

As to providing for the payment of a certain sum of money due to the French Republic, Mr. King made the following report:

It appears by a statement of the account between the United States and France, reported to the House of Representatives, that, according to the view which is entertained at the Treasury of that account, the United States, on the 1st day of January, 1794, were in advance to France the sum of 2,111,086 livres tournois and 5 deniers (being $383,162.11), beyond the installments and principal and all interest which had accrued to that period.

It further appears upon inquiry at the Treasury that, since that period, there has been advanced on account of our debt to France the further sum of $71,242.81.

And it appears likewise, from the papers referred to the committee, that the President has promised further payment upon the same account of 1,500,000 livres on the 3d of September next, and of 1,000,000 livres on the 5th of November next, making together $453,750; which payments, it is understood, may be anticipated at the Bank of the United States, in the proportions and at the epochs which are desired by the minister of the French Republic.

These sums embrace all the parts of principal which by contract would become payable to France during the year 1794, beyond which, were there no anticipations, nothing would be demandable during the present year but the interest on the balance of the entire debt, which balance, on the 1st day of January, 1794, is computed at the Treasury at $2,611,587.88; whence it results that the payments which have been made and engaged to be made exceed those which by the terms of contract could be demanded.

This being the case, and the loan in question having been in its origin specifically appropriated to the purpose of the sinking fund, it is the opinion of the committee that it is not advisable to divert it from its destination, as is proposed by the bill referred to them, and consequently that the bill should not pass.

(Annals, 3d Cong., 1st sess., 127, 129.)

FOURTH CONGRESS, FIRST SESSION.

February 25, 1796. On the treaty with the Dey of Algiers of February 15, 1796, Mr. Ellsworth reported as follows:

That the expense of procuring and transporting to Algiers the naval

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