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truly with me, bury me not, I pray thee, in Egypt; but I will lie with my fathers; and thou shalt carry ine out of Egypt, and bury me in their burya ing place : and he said, I will do as thou hast said. And he said, swear unto me.

And he sware unto him. And Israel bowed himself upon the bed's head.

And Joseph dwelt in the land of Egypt, he, and his father's house: and Joseph lived an hundred and ten years. And he saw Ephraim's children, of the third generation : the children, also, of Machir the son of Manasseh, were brought up upon Joseph's knees. And Joseph said unto his brethren, I die; and God will surely visit you, and bring you out of this land unto the land which hè sware to. Abraham, to Isaac, and to Jacob. And Joseph took an oath of the children of Israel, saying, God will surely visit y, and ye shall carry up my bones from hence. So eph died; and they embalmed, him and put him in a coffin in Egypt.

ON THE

SCRIPTURE PROPER NAMES.

S.

C, in the Roman character, sounds like, k.
C, in the Italic ditto,
Ch, in the Roman ditto,

k.
Ch, in the Italic ditto,

tsh,
Except in didrachm, where it is silent.
G, in the Roman character, sounds hard.
G, in the Italic ditto, sounds like, dj.

Ph, always sounds like, f: except in Stephen.
In

pph and tth, the former p and t are generally not sounded, as in, Apph-us, Matth-ew, &c. pronounced Af-us, Math-ew.

X, at the beginning of words, sounds like, z.

Words printed in Italics represent the sound of the preceding word.

Monosyllables have been omitted where the sound is certain.

In other instances Italic letters are not sounded. For further remarks on the principles of pronunciation, the reader is referred to the New English Spelling Book.

THE END.

BY

By the same Author, Price One Shilling,

THE SECOND EDITION OF THE
ART OF TEACHING

THE
Spelling, Accent and Pronunciation of the

English Language,
EXERCISES OF IMITATION.
Containing a great Variety of illustrative Remarks, with

prefatory Observations on Syllabication, or, the Division of Words into Syllables; in which that System, as taugiit by ancient, and some modern, Grammarians, is proved to be founded on erroneous Principles.

Extract from the Critical Review, May, 1801. 66 The Preface to this work should be perused by every “ Schoolmaster. The Plan of Instruction laid down in * the Body of it is admirable; and by the gradual exer6 cising of Children in its System, they will, in riper 6 Years, become Masters of all those Difficulties in our * Language, which, to mere English Scholars, have often “ been represented as insuperable. After the true Sound “ of a few Words has been taught, the Pupil will easily “ gain Access to the Method of analysing his Sounds'; 66 and the Pen, the Ear, and the Tongue, will mutually 46 assist each other."

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THE THIRD EDITION OF THE NEW ENGLISH SPELLING BOOK;

OR, KEY TO THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE. " It has been a Subject of occasional Complaint, and 66 not withoạt apparent Cause, that our rudimental " Treatises on the English Language have been indo66 lently copied from each other, or heedlessly carried on, “ from Edition to Edition, without such progressive Im* provements as practical Observation might, with little “ Labour, have supplied. The recent Productions of “ Messrs. Murray, Walker, and others, have gone far " to remove the Deficiencies complained of; but in no 66 scholastic Publication have the Mysteries of our Lan* guge been so completely unveiled, as in Mr. Robin

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