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Herodotus :

Lib. viii. cap. 8.

Lib. ix. cap. 81.
Plato :-"Egaotas, page 136, s v.

PASSAGES GIVEN TO BE TRANSLATED INTO GREEK.

Translation into Greek is not prescribed for any office, but is

introduced in those competitive Examinations of which Greek forms a part.

“The chief reason that induced me to enter upon this subject is the observation I have made, of the many fallacies and circumventions in the world, especially in servants towards their masters; and I have always found that proud and stately princes who will hear but few are more liable to be imposed on than those who are open and accessible : but of all the princes that I ever had the honour to know, the wisest and most dexterous to extricate himself out of any danger or difficulties in time of adversity, was our king (Louis XI.]. He was the humblest in his conversation and habit, and the most painful and indefatigable to win over any man to his side, that he thought capable of doing him either much mischief or good : though he was often refused, he would never give over a man that he once undertook, but still pressed and continued his insinuations, promising him largely, and presenting him with such suns and pensions as he knew would satisfy his ambition; and for such as he had discarded in the time of peace and prosperity, he paid dear (when he had occasion for them) to recover them again ; but, when he had once reconciled them, he retained no pique to them for what had passed, but employed them freely for the future. He was naturally kind and ndulgent to persons of indifferent condition, and morose to such as he thought had no need of him.”—PHILIP DE COMMINES. (For Iambics.) Shelley.- Prometheus unbound. “ Then Prometheus

the shape of death.”

LATIN.

PASSAGES GIVEN TO BE TRANSATED FROM LATIN INTO ENGLISH.

Translation from Latin is prescribed to Candidates for the Civil Service Commission. Record Office. House of Commons.

Office of Paymaster of Civil Customs (Solicitor's Office). Services in Ireland (Record Ecclesiastical Commission. Department). Home Office.

MENT.

IT MAY BE SELECTED AS A BRANCH OF EXAMINATION BY CANDIDATES.

FOR THE ADMIRALTY (WHITEHALL).

PARLIAMENT OFFICE. DITTO (SOMERSET HOUSE). DEPARTMENT OF

SCIENCE AND DITTO (REGISTRY OF).

ART. CHARITABLE TRUSTS COMMISSION. BOARD OF TRADE. COLONIAL OFFICE.

TREASURY. FACTORY INSPECTORS' DEPART- WAR DEPARTMENT.

QUEEN'S AND LORD TREASURER's FOREIGN OFFICE (UNPAID At- REMEMBRANCER'S OFFICE. Tachés).

ROYAL OBSERVATORY, EDINBURGH. METROPOLITAN POLICE COURTS. MILITARY OFFICES IN DUBLIN.

“Ceterum fama tanti facinoris per omnem Africam brevi divulgatur. Adherbalem omnesque, qui sub imperio Micipsae fuerant, metus invadit. In duas partes discedunt Numidæ : plures Adherbalem sequuntur, sed illum alterum bello meliores. Igitur Iugurtha quam maxumas potest copias armat: urbes partim vi, alias voluntate imperio suo adiungit: omni Numidiae imperare parat. At Adherbal, tametsi Romam legatos miserat, qui senatum docerent de caede fratris et fortunis suis; tamen, fretus multitudine militum parabat armis contendere. Sed ubi res ad certamen venit, victus ex praelio profugit in provinciam, ac deinde Romam contendit. Tum Iugurtha, patratis consiliis, postquam omni Numidia potiebatur, in otio facinus suum cum animo reputans, timere populum Romanum, neque adversus iram eius usquam, nisi in avaritia nobilitatis et pecunia sua, spem habere. Itaque paucis diebus cum argento et auro multo legatos Romam mittit, quibus praecipit, uti primum veteres amicos muneribus expleant: deinde novos acquirant: postremo, quemcumque possint, largiundo parare ne cunctentur. Sed ubi Romam legati venere, et ex praecepto regis hospitibus aliisque, quorum ea tempestate in senatu auctoritas pollebat, magna munera misere, tanta commutatio incessit, uti ex maxuma invidia in gratiam et favorem nobilitatis Iugurtha venerit, quorum pars spe, alii praemio inducti, singulos ex Senatu ambiundo nitebantur, ne gravius in eum consuleretur. Igitur, ubi legati satis confidunt, die constituto, Senatus utrisque datur.” -SALLUST.

Other papers :-
Virgil :

(1.) Georg. ii. 136–157.
(2.) Georg. ii. 475–502.
(3.) Æn. vi. 156–178.
(4.) Æn. xi. 300-323.

(5.) Æn. xi. 376-398. Cornelius Nepos :

(1.) Vita Catonis, cap. iii.

(2.) Vita Alcibiadis, cap. viii. Sallust :-Bell. Jugurth, capp. 57, 58. Cesar :

(1.) De Bell. Gall. lib. viii. capp. 1 and 2.
(2.) De Bell. Civ. lib. ii. cap. 6.
(3.) De Bell. Civ. lib. iii. cap. 37.

Livy

(1.) Lib. v. cap. ii. (to “exercerent").
(2.) Lib. xl. cap. 8 (to “ cecinerim ”).

(3.) Lib. xli. cap. 2. Cicero :

(1.) In Verrem. act ii. lib. ii. cap. 1.

(2.) De Divinatione, lib. i. cap. 27. Tacitus :

(1.) Annal. lib. xiii. cap. 38.

(2.) Agricola, cap. 22. Plautus : -Rudens, Act i. sc. 5. Horace:

(1.) Odes i. 31.
(2.) Epistles i. 2, 1-14.

.

PASSAGES GIVEN TO BE TRANSLATED INTO LATIN.

Translation into Latin is not prescribed for any office, but is

introduced in those competitive Examinations of which Latin forms a part.

What youth can say, any more than an old man, that he shall live until night? Youth catches distempers more easily, its sickness is more violent, and its recovery more doubtful. The youth, indeed, hopes for many more days: so cannot the old man. The youth's hopes are ill.grounded; for what is more foolish than to place any confidence upon an uncertainty ! But the old man has not room so much as to hope: he is still happier than the youth, he has already enjoyed what the other does but hope for. One wishes to live long, the other has lived long. But, alas ! is there anything in human life the duration of which can be called long? Nothing which must end ought to be valued for its continuance. If hours, days, months, and years pass away, it is no matter what hour, what day, what month, or what year we die. The applause of a good actor is due to him at whatever scene of the play he makes his exit. It is thus in the life of a man of sense: a short life is sufficient for him to manifest himself a man of honour and virtue; when he ceases to be such he has lived too long, and while he is such it is of no consequence to him how long he shall be so, provided he is so to his life's end. — Spectator.

Other papers :
(3.) Chesterfield: - Letters to his son, No. C.

“As often as I write .... your only friend."
(4.) Arnold, History of Rome, vol. i. p. 306.

“ Early in the morning .... the crowd gave way.”
(5.) Ditto, vol. ii. p. 221.

“ No attentions .... better omen.”
(6.) Hume, History of England, vol. i. p. 57, cap. 2.

Though sometimes repulsed .... in safety."

:

66

(7.) Ditto, vol. ii. p. 188, cap. 16.
“ Here commences

valour and humanity.”
(8.) Spectator, No. 6.

“ It happened at Athens ..... practise it.”
(For Hexameters) Arnold :—Sohrab and Rustum.

" As when some hunter ..... knew him not."
(For Lyrics.) Shakespeare. Henry VIII. Act iii. sc. 1.
“Orpheus with bis lute .....

die."

FRENCH. PASSAGES GIVEN TO BE TRANSLATED FROM FRENCH INTO ENGLISH. Translation from French is prescribed to Candidates for the Admiralty (Whitehall).

Privy Council Office. Customs (Landing Waiters at Record Office.

Newhaven, Folkestone, & Dublin Metropolitan Police Dover.)

(Divisional Offices). House of Commons.

Education Office. Foreign Office.

Office of Paymaster of Civil Ditto

(Unpaid Attaches). Services Ireland (Record DeHome Office.

partment). Metropolitan Police Office.

IT MAY BE SELECTED AS A BRANCH OF EXAMINATION BY CANDIDATES

FOR THE

MENT.

ADMIRALTY (SOMERSET House). DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART.
CHARITABLE Trusts COMMISSION. BOARD OF TRADE.
CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION.

TREASURY.
COLONIAL OFFICE.

WAR DEPARTMENT. ECCLESIASTICAL COMMISSION. OFFICE OF Woods. FACTORY INSPECTOR'S DEPART- QUEEN'S AND LORD TREASURER'S

REMEMBRANCER's Office. METROPOLITAN POLIce Courts. ROYAL OBSERVATORY, EDINBURGH. PARLIAMENT OFFICE.

MILITARY OFFICES IN DUBLIN. “Il faut que je vous conte une petite historiette qui est très vraie, et qui vous divertira. Le Roi se mêle depuis peu de faire des vers. MM. de St. Aignan et de Dangeau lui apprennent comment il faut s'y prendre. Il fit l'autre jour un petit madrigal, que lui même ne trouva pas trop joli. Un matin il dit au Maréchal de Grammont: 'Monsieur le Maréchal, lisez je vous prie ce petit madrigal, et voyez si vous en avez jamais vu un si impertinent; parcequ'on sait que depuis peu j'aime les vers, on m'en apporte de toutes les façons.' Le Maréchal, après avoir lu, dit au Roi: • Sire, votre Majesté juge divinement bien de toutes les choses ; il est vrai que voilà le plus sot et le plus ridicule madrigal que j'aie jamais lu.' Le Roi se mit à rire, et lui dit: ‘N’est il pas vrai que celui qui l'a fait est un fat?' • Sire, il n'y a pas moyen de lui donner un autre nom.' 'Oh!

6. Tout en

.

bien,' dit le Roi, je suis ravi que vous m'en ayez parlé si bonnement; c'est moi qui l'ai fait. “Ah! Sire, quelle trahison! que votre Majesté me le rende; je l'ai lu brusquement. Non, M. le Maréchal, les premiers sentiments sont toujours les plus naturels.'

“Le Roi a beaucoup ri de cette folie; et tout le monde trouve que c'est la plus cruelle petite chose que l'on puisse faire à un vieux courtisan. Pour moi, qui aime toujours à faire des reflexions, je voudrais que le Roi en fît là dessus, et qu'il jugeât par là combien il est loin de connaître jamais la vérité."— MME. DE Sévigné.

Other papers :-
Montalembert :- L'Avenir Politique de l'Angleterre. Cap. ii.
Angleterre est discuté

pour si peu.” Voltaire : (1.) Mahomet. Act ii. scene v. “ Chaque peuple son tour

il la faut asservir.” (2.) Siècle de Louis XIV. chap. xxviii. “ Louis XIV. avait dans

l'esprit ... un des plus braves.” La Bruyère :- Des Ouvrages de l'Esprit.

(1.) “ Si certains esprits vifs du bon et du beau.”

(2.) “D'on vient que l'on rit se morfondre.” Thiers :- Histoire du Consulat et de l'Empire.

(1.) Liv. xxix. (vol. viii. p. 510.) “Le Prince de la Paix .....

dans sa jeunesse.” (2.) Liv. xliv. (vol. xiv. p. 370.) “ Tandis ... ... Napoléon.” (3.) Liv. xliv. (vol. xiv. p. 370.) "A cet aspect magique.

le dernier.” (4.) Liv. xlv. (vol. xiv. p. 655.) " A la vue des murs de Wilna

. l'autre." (5.) Liv. xlv. (vol. xiv. p. 660.) Aux portes de Wilna ...

un pareil butin." (6.) Liv. xlvii. (vol. xv. p. 154.) “ Le duc de Vicence ...... ni

affaiblie.” Louis Blanc:- Histoire de la Révolution Française. Vol. i. cap. v. Colbert.

“En jugeant Colbert. périt toujours.” Guizot:- Cromwell. “ La République ...... un prétendu Protecteur.” Mémoires de Mme. Roland, II ne partie. “Un jour ...... offrait le repos

et l'abri.” Ste. Beuve :- Portraits Littéraires. M. Thiers. “En histoire la méthode

de M. Thiers .... des plus grandes choses.” Rousseau : Confessions. Partie i. Liv. vi. Ici commence

malgré mes malheurs." Lettres de Mme. de Sévigné :- A sa fille. “Enfin ma fille ...... celui de

sa mort.” Fénélon :- Télémaque. Liv. vii. “Les hommes, dans le Bétique ...

tout leur bonheur.” Mignet :- Histoire de la Révolution Française. (1.) Chap. vi. (vol. i. p. 325.) “Sur ces entrefaites

à tout accusé." (2.) Chap. viii. (vol. i. p. 36.) “Il fit un tableau

de l'armée. Suspect."

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