Слике страница
PDF
ePub

GLOSSARY.

nd

Darsn't, used indiscriminately, either

in singular or plural number, for

dare not, dares not, and dared not. Deacon off, to give the cue to; derived from a custom, once universal, but

extinct, in our New England Congregational churches. An im. portant part of the office of deacon was to read aloud the hymns given out by the minister, one line at a time, the congregation singing each

Act'lly, actually.
Air, are.
Airth, earth.
Airy, area.
Aree, area.
Arter, after.
Ax, ask.

Beller, bellow.
Bellowses, lungs.
Ben, been.
Bile, boil.
Bimeby, by and by.
Blurt out, to speak bluntly.
Bust, burst.
Buster, a roistering blade; used also

as a general superlative.

line as soon as read.
Demmercrat, leadin', one in favour of
extending slavery: a free-trade lec-

turer maintained in the custom-house.
Desput, desperate.
Doos, does.
Doughface, a contented lickspittle; a

common variety of Northern politi.

cian.
Dror, draw.
Du, do.
Dunno, dno, do not or does not know.
Dut, dirt,

Caird, carried.
Cairn, carrying,
Caleb, a turncoat.
Cal’late, calculate.
Cass, a person with two lives.
Close, clothes.
Cockerel, a young cock.
Cocktail, a kind of drink; also, an

ornament peculiar to soldiers. Convention, a place where people are

imposed on; 2 juggler's show. Coons, a cant term for a now defunct

party; derived, perhaps, from the fact of their being commonly up a

tree. Cornwallis, a sort of muster in mas

querade; supposed to have had its origin soon after the Revolution, and to commemorate the surrender of Lord Cornwallis. It took the place of the old Guy Fawkes pro

cession. Crooked suick, a perverse, froward

person.
Cunnle, a colonel.
Cus, a curse; also, a pitiful fellow,

Eend, end.
Ef, if
Emptins, yeast.
Envy, enroy.
Everlasting, an intensive, without re-

ference to duration.
Ev'y, every
Ez, as.

Fence, on the ; said of one who halts

between two opinions ; a trimmer, Fer,

for Ferfle, ferful, fearful; also an inten.

sive.
Fin', find.
Fish-skin, used in New England to

clarify coffee.
Fix, a difficulty, a nonplus.
Foller, folly, to follow,

[blocks in formation]

Mash, marsh.
Mean, stingy, ill-natured.
Min', mind.
Nimepunce, ninepence, twelve and a

half cents. Nowers, nowhere. Offen, often. Ole, old. Ollers, olluz, always. On, of; used before it or them, or at the end of a sentence, as, on't,

on'em, nut ez ever I heerd on.
On'y, only.
Ossifer, officer (seldom heard).
Peaked, pointed.
Peek, to peep.
Pickurel, the pike, a fish.
Pint, point.
Pocket full of rocks, plenty of money.
Pooty, pretty.
Pop'ler, conceited, popular.
Pus, purse.
Put out, troubled, vexed.

Quarter, a quarter-dollar.
Queen's arm, a musket,
Resh, rush.
Revelee, the réveille.
Rile, to trouble.
Riled, angry; disturbed, as the sedi.

ment in any liquid. Riz, risen. Row, a long row to hoe, a dificult

task. Rugged, robust. Sarse, abuse, impertinence. Sartin, certain. Saxon, sacristan, sexton. Scaliest, worst. Scringe, cringe. Scrouge, to crowd. Sech, such. Set by, valued. Shakes, great, of considerable con.

sequence. Shappoes, chapeaux, cocked-hats. Sheer, share. Shet, shut. Shut, shirt. Skeered, scared. Skeeter, mosquito. Skooting, running, or mocing swiftly. Slarterin', slaughtering. Slim, contemptible. Snaked, crawled like a snake; but to

snake any one out is to track him to his hiding.place; to snace a ting

out is to snatch it out, Softies, sofas.

Keer, care.
Kep', kept.
Killock, a small anchor.
Kin', kin' o', kinder, kind, kind of.

Lawth, loath.
Less, let's, let us.
Let daylight into, to shoot.
Let on, to hint, to confess, to own.
Lick, to beat, to overcome.
Lights, the bowels.
Lily.pads, leaves of the water.lily.
Long-sweetening, molusses.

Ugly, ill-tempered, intractable.
Uncle Sam, United States; the largest

boaster of liberty and owner of

slaves. Unrizzest, applied to dough or bread;

heavy, most unrisen, or most, incapable of rising.

Sogerin', soldiering ; a barbarous

amusement common among men in

the savage state. Som'ers, somewhere. Bo'st, 80 as that. Sot, set, obstinate, resolute. Spiles, spoils ; objects of political am

bition. Spry, active. Staddles, stout stakes driven into the

satt marshes, on which the hay-ricks are set, and thus raised out of the

reach of high tides. Streaked, uncomfortable, discomforted. Suckle, circle. Sutthin', something. Suttin, certain.

V-spot, a fire-dollar bill. Vally, value.

Take on, to sorrow,
Talents, talons.
Taters, potatoes.
Tell, till
Tetch, touch.
Tetch tu, to be able; used always after

a negative in this sense. Tollable, tolerable. Toot, used derisively for playing on

any wind instrument. Thru, through. Thundering, a euphemism common in New England, for the profane English expression devilish. Perhaps derived from the belief, common formerly, that thunder was caused by the Prince of the air, for some of whose accomplishments

consult Cotton Mather. Tu, to, too; commonly has this sound

when used emphatically, or at the end of a sentence. At other times it has the sound of t in tough, as, Ware yu goin' tu! Goin' ta Boston

Wake snakes, to get into trouble.
Wall, well ; spoken with great delibo.

ration, and sometimes with the a very much flattened, sometimes (but more seldom) very much broadened. Wannut, walnut (hickory). Ware, where. Ware, were. Whopper, an uncommonly large lie ;

as, that General Taylor is in favour

of the Wilmot Proviso. Wig, Whig; a party now dissolved. Wunt, will not. Wus, worse. Wut, what. Wuth, worth; as, Antislavery perfes.

sions 'fore 'lection aint wuth a Bung.

town copper.
Wuz, was, sometimes were

Yaller, yellow.
Yeller, yellow.
Yellers, a disease of peach-trees.

Zach, Ole, a second Washington, an

antislavery slaveholder, a" humane buyer and seller of men and womex Christian hero generally.

a. Cowan & Co., Strathmore Fress, Perth,

The power of English Literature is in its Poets."

MOXON'S POPULAR POETS.

Edited, with Critical Memoir, by WILLIAM MICHAEL ROSSETTI. New and Enlarged Editions, Red Border Lines, and Eight Illustrations each.

The press and the public, alike in Great Britain and her Colonies, and in the United States, unite in their testimony to the immense superiority of Messrs. Moxon's Popular Poets over any other similar collections published by any other house. Their possession of the Copyright works of Coleridge, Hood, Keats, Shelley. Wordsworth, and other great National Poets, places this series above rivalry.

I. BYRON'S POETICAL WORKS.
2. LONGFELLOW'S POETICAL WORKS.
3. WORDSWORTH'S POETICAL WORKS.
4. SCOTT'S POETICAL WORKS.
5. SHELLEY'S POETICAL WORKS.
6. MOORE'S POETICAL WORKS.
7. HOOD'S POETICAL WORKS.
8. KEATS' POETICAL WORKS.
9. COLERIDGE'S POETICAL WORKS.
10. BURNS' POETICAL WORKS.
II. TUPPER'S PROVERBIAL PHILOSOPHY.
12. MILTON'S POETICAL WORKS.
13. CAMPBELL'S POETICAL WORKS.
14. POPE'S POETICAL WORKS.
15. COWPER'S POETICAL WORKS.
16. HUMOROUS POEMS.
17. AMERICAN POEMS.
18. MRS. HEMANS' POETICAL WORKS.
19. THOMSON'S POETICAL WORKS.
20. MISCELLANEOUS POEMS.
21. HOOD'S POETICAL WORKS (Second Series).
22. WHITTIER'S POETICAL WORKS.
23. LOWELL'S POETICAL WORKS.
24. YOUNG'S POETICAL WORKS.
25. SHAKESPEARE'S COMPLETE WORKS.

26. KEBLE'S CHRISTIAN YEAR. Enlarged in size, and with Red Border Lines, Critical Memoir, and Eight Illustrations each, handsomely bound, cloth gilt, gilt edges,

PRICE 3s. 6d. PER VOLUME. Also to be had in the following varieties of binding-morocco, 75. 6d. ; morocco extra, 8s.; tree calf, ios. 6d.; relief leather, 12s. 6d.

London: WARD, LOCK & CO., Salisbury Square, E.O.

« ПретходнаНастави »