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DEPARTMENT OF STATE

PUBLICATION 2484

CONFERENCE SERIES 82

(Reprinted)

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C.

Price 15 cents

sept of state

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page

Letter of Transmission from the Honorable James

F. Byrnes, Secretary of State, to the President of the United States

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PART I

Preparation for the General Assembly iii

1

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PART II
The Establishment of Functioning Organization

President of the General Assembly
The General Assembly
The Security Council .
The Economic and Social Council
The Trusteeship Council
The Secretary-General and the Secretariat
The International Court of Justice .
Nominations
Languages
League of Nations Functions, Activities, and

Assets
Headquarters of the United Nations
Representation of Non-Governmental Organi-

zations

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PART III
Major Substantive Problems
Control and Use of Atomic Energy for Peaceful

Purposes
Iran; Syria and Lebanon
The United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation

Administration
Refugees
Food Shortage .
Economic Reconstruction
Trade and Employment, and Health
War Criminals.

Spain . .
CONCLUSION

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I. Address by the Honorable James F. Byrnes,

Senior United States Representative to the

General Assembly, January 14, 1946
II. Resolution on Establishment of a Commis-

sion on Atomic Energy .
A. Statement of the United States Posi-

tion in the Committee by Senator
Tom Connally, January 21, 1946 . .

,
B. Statement by the Honorable James F.

Byrnes in the General Assembly,

January 24, 1946 . .
III. Resolution on the United Nations Relief

and Rehabilitation Administration IV. Resolution on Refugees

V. Resolution on Wheat and Rice .
VI. Resolution on Reconstruction of Countries

Belonging to the United Nations Devas

tated by War . . VII. Resolution on Non-Self-Governing Peoples . VIII. Resolution on Representation of Non-Gov

ernmental Organizations on the Economic

and Social Council ..
IX. Resolution on the Extradition and Punish-

ment of War Criminals
X. Resolution on Spain ..:
XI. United States Delegation .
XII. Officers of the General Assembly, and Mem-

bers of the Security Council, of the Eco-
nomic and Social Council, and of the Inter-
national Court of Justice.

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51

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Letter of Transmission from the Honorable James F.

Byrnes, Secretary of State, to the President of the United States.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE

WASHINGTON

March 1, 1946 THE PRESIDENT:

I have the honor to transmit my Report on the activities of the Delegation representing the United States at the First Part of the First Session of the General Assembly of the United Nations held in London from January 10 to February 14. I also enclose a copy of this Report with the suggestion that you may wish to forward it to the Congress for its information and for the information of the American people.

The first formal session of the 51 nations united under the Charter adopted at the San Francisco Conference last June ends a long chapter of preparation for peace carried out even in the midst of war. It opens a new chapter of active collaboration of the United Nations for the maintenance of the peace finally won after that Conference and for the encouragement of relations and the promotion of conditions conducive to peace throughout the world.

The first step along this road took place only three weeks after Pearl Harbor when, on January 1, 1942, the United Nations Declaration was signed at the White House pledging the 26 governments then signatory to the Declaration to cooperate to win the war.

Next began a series of special United Nations conferences called on specific matters which seemed ripe for discussion such as Food and Agriculture, Relief and Rehabilitation, Monetary and Financial Cooperation, Civil Aviation, and Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Cooperation, which by the present date has resulted in the establishment of a group of specialized international organizations.

In October of 1943, the necessity of establishing a general organization for the maintenance of international peace and security was recognized at the Moscow conference of the Foreign Ministers of the United States, the United Kingdom, and the Soviet Union, and their wide and decisive measure of agreement in principle, in which China joined, was announced in the Declaration of Moscow.

In the autumn of 1944, representatives of these powers met at Dumbarton Oaks and agreed upon definite proposals for a general

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