Слике страница
PDF
ePub

to Perth Amboy, thence northerly along the westerly side of the Arthur Kill to a connection with the Middle belt line (No. 1) south of Elizabethport. The portion of this line which exists to be improved and added to where necessary. This line will open up territory for commercial and industrial development. It has a length of approximately fifteen and one-quarter miles, of which about nine and onehalf miles now exist.

No. 12. A marginal railroad extending along the easterly shore of Newark bay and the Hackensack river and connects with the Middle belt line (No. 1). This line which does not now exist will open up territory for commercial and industrial development. It has a length of approximately seven miles.

[ocr errors]

No. 13. A marginal railroad extending along the westerly side of the Hudson river and the Upper New York bay. It is made up mostly of existing lines the Erie Terminals, Jersey Junction, Hoboken Shore, and National Docks railroads. It is to be improved and added to where necessary. This line, connected with Middle belt line (No. 1), and operated as a belt line will serve the waterfront. and open up territory for commercial and industrial development. It has a length of approximately sixteen and one-half miles of which about fifteen miles now exist.

No. 14. A marginal railroad connecting with the Middle belt line (No. 1), and extending through the Hackensack and Secaucus Meadows. It will open up territory for commercial and industrial development. It is a new line and has a length of approximately twenty-three miles.

No. 15. The outer belt line, extending around the westerly limits of the Port District beyond the congested section. Its northerly terminus is on the Hudson river at Piermont above the harbor congestion and it connects by marginal railroads at the southerly end with the harbor waters below the congested section. By spurs it connects with the Middle belt line (No. 1) on the westerly shore of Newark Bay and with the marginal railroad on the westerly

shore of Staten Island (No. 9). It will have great value in that it will afford military protection to the Port District. It will serve as an interchange between the railroads beyond the congestion and will open up territory for industrial development. It has a length of approximately seventy-one miles which is all new construction.

No. 16. The automatic electric system for serving Manhattan Island. Its yards will connect with the Middle belt line and with all the railroads of the Port District. It is a standard gauge underground railroad deep enough in Manhattan to permit of two levels of rapid transit subways to pass over it. The only standard railroad cars that will be brought through to its Manhattan terminals will be those with perishables and food products in refrigerator cars. Cars with merchandise freight will be stopped at its yards. Freight from standard cars will be transferred on to wheeled containers, thence to special electrically propelled cars which will bear it to Manhattan. This freight will be kept on wheels "between the door of the standard freight car at the transfer point and the tail board of the truck at the Manhattan terminal or the Store Door as may be elected by the shipper or consignee, thus eliminating all extra handling. Freight cars will thus be released more quickly from the terminals, thus effecting a material saving in the use of railroad equipment.

66

Union terminal stations located on Manhattan in zones of equal trucking distance, as to pick-ups and deliveries, will be served by this system. These terminals will contain storage space and space for other facilities. The automatic electric system will bring all the railroads of the port to Manhattan on equal terms as to time, service and cost.

This system is described in full detail as to operation, capacity, cost, etc., in Chapter 14 of the report of the New York, New Jersey Port and Harbor Development Commission.

DESCRIPTION OF PLAN FOR PRESENT RELIEF

This plan calls for the establishment of a motor truck service between the railroads of the Port District and the Island of Manhattan.

This service, in order to avoid delays which make for the present high trucking costs, may properly be a service which utilizes the principle of the container and may either be performed by motor trucks with detachable bodies serving as containers or by motor trucks whose bodies carry containers. The container principle is to avoid all unnecessary handlings and to reduce to a minimum the loading and unloading time of the motor truck, leaving it free to perform the function for which it is designed the rapid carrying of freight.

Such a service at present should utilize as far as possible the existing ferries in order to minimize length of haul under power. For the same reason the transfer points between freight car and motor truck should be as near to the ferries as possible.

The service divides itself naturally into two functions the handling of such carload lot freight as is now handled at Manhattan's railroad pier stations and the handling of the less carload lot freight now handled at these piers and at local freight houses.

Part of the carload lot and less carload lot of freight can undoubtedly be delivered to or collected from the store door with no intermediate station between it and the freight car. This is the first and most economic function of the motor truck service.

The second is the handling of carload lot and less carload lot freight between the car and the merchant who does not desire store door delivery or whose business is of such a character as does not permit of it. For this class freight inland freight stations should be provided on Manhattan

« ПретходнаНастави »