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RAILROAD, CANAL, AND STEAMBOAT STATISTICS.

COMMERCE OF THE NEW YORK CANALS.

The following tables, derived from the official report of the Canal Commissioners, show the the total quantity of each article which came to tide-water on all of the canals, and the estimated value of each article during the years 1849, 1850, and 1851: STATEMENT SHOWING THE TOTAL QUANTITY OF EACH ARTICLE WHICH CAME TO THE HUDSON

RIVER OX ALL THE CANALS DURING THE YEARS 1849, 1850, AND 1851.

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Flour

...bbls.

3,263,087 3,256,077 Wheat.

.bushels 2,734,389 3,670,754 Rye

322,942 472,305 Corn...

5,121,270 3,228,056 Corn meal

.bbls.

11,983 Barley...

.bushels 1,400,194 1,744,867 Oats...

2,407,895 2,469,637 Bran and shipstuffs.

.lbs. 2,022,031 402,464,000 Peas and beans.

.bushels 160,234 79,515 Potatoes

242,211 230,699 Dried fruit.

... lbs. 780,369 1,468,000

ALL OTHER AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS. Cotton .....

.lbs. 316,094 1,114,000 Unmanufactured tobacco..

1,896,056 796,000 Hemp...

66,000 Clover and grass seed.

2,479,098 1,418,000 Flax seed.,

1,381,684 1,146,000 Hops ....

1,877,805 860,000

3,358,465 3,163,682

302,608 7,670,345

7,335 1,881,101 3,634,682 45,476,249

129,502 600,182 1,426,350

237,330 3,698,690 1,161,040

559,400 156,500 550,886

MANUFACTURES.

Domestic spirits
Beer.....
Lioseed oil.

..gallons

2,107,595

.bbls. ..gallons

1,517,095

95 903

2,810,498

63 100

1849.

1850. 1851. Oil meal and cake...

.lbs.

6,392,000 6,814,000 Starch ...

2,744,000 2,556,932 Leather...

5,532,610 7,176,000 8,203,605 Furniture..

1,116,300 1,102,000 1,056,719 Agricultural implements.

16,000 316,840 Bar and pig lead.

11,167 88,000 16,400 Pig iron..

9,636,166 5,276,000 6,756,400 Castings.

1,580,000 2,470,730 Machines, and parts thereof.

280,000 153,810 Bloom and bar iron ..

27,906,016 22,126,000 33,449,234 Iron ware.....

1,737,690

3,700 Domestic woolens..

1,055,513 '1,018,000 824,340 Domestic cottons

2,498,425 1,868,000 2,249,835 Domestic salt

283,333 13,164,000 12,962,156 Foreign salt.....

1,326,600 1,195,000

OTHER ARTICLES. Live cattle, hogs, and sheep

lbs.

1,578,000 869,350 Stone, lime, and clay.....

61,323,818 87,916,000 104,167,030 Gypsum.

2,551,600 6,950,000 9,669,600 Eggs

3,280,000 3,678,264 Mineral coal

25,169,939 32,146,000 40,622,220 Fish ...

458,000 277,515 Copper ore.

104,000 417,780 Flint enameled ware

2,000 Sundries ......

110,244,928 94,112,000 111,020,090 STATEMENT SHOWING THE AGGREGATE, IN TONS, UNDER THE DIVISIONS AS SPECIFIED IN

THE ABOVE TABLE.
1849. 1850.

1851.
The forest

665,547 947,768 921,337 Agriculture

796,600 926,048 895,096 Manufactures.

44,288 39,669 53,553 Merchandise...

5,873

7,105 5,349 Other articles...

94,638 113,273 135,365

Total

1,579,946 2,033,863 2,010,700 STATEMENT SHOWING THE ESTIMATED VALUE OF EACH ARTICLE WHICH CAME TO THE HUDSON RIVER, ON ALL THE CANALS, DURING THE YEARS 1849, 1850, 1851.

THE FOREST.
1849.

1850. 1851. Par and peltry ...

.lbs. $692,864 $818,845 $605,200

PRODUCT OF WOOD. Boards and scantling...

.feet 4,459,157 6,365,724 7,226,127 Shingles.

.M. 153,774 202,668 205,899 Timber.

.cubic feet 119,598 440,490 697,465 Staves,

lbs. 693,701 908,812 745,482 Wood

56,892 60,743 58,855 Ashes, pot and pearl

..bbls. 1,016,800 1,518,035 841,732

AGRICULTURE.-PRODUCT OF ANIMALS. Pork.

.bbls. 758,421 612,798 663,940 Beef..

1,244,360 866,789 661,300 Bacon..

lbs. 514,666 580,922 980,956 Cheese

2,736,211 1,955,122 1,663,606 Butter

2,923,832 2,391,863 1,338,997 Lard.

635,814 620,868 973,340 Lard oil.. ...gallons

42,506 168,587

lbs. 4,072,358 4,372,578 4,101,416 Hides.

59,637 54,891 68,432 Tallow

40,524 18,712 VOL. XXVII.--NO. I.

8

...cords

Wool

VEGETABLE FOOD.

1849. 1850. Kour..

..bbls. 16,315,435 16,280,425 Wheat.

.bushels 2,993,160 3,937,763 Bye

187,545 315,928 Corn.

2,970,482 2,000,890 Corn meal

.bbls.

35,949 Barley..

.. bushels 868,116 1,417,827 Oats..

868,084 1,014,678 Bran and shipstuffs

. lbs. 242,755 927,863 Peas and beans.

.bushels 160,234 89,382 Potatoes ..

117,918 123,269 Dried fruit

.. lbs. 78,007 132,019

ALL OTHEE AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS. Cotton..

.lbs.

29,240 153,239 Uvmanufactured tobacco..

237,007 159,005

4,960 Clover and grass seed

148,746 92,106 Flax seed..

30,536 27,745 Hops

162,893 159,647

1851. 13,436,542 3,051,110

198,099 4,447,682

20,172 1,484,541 1,363,352 366,691 143,299 342,275 114,108

Hemp...

25,520 813,712 75,469 41,817

3,130 146,380

MANUFACTURES. Domestic spirits

..gallons 526,938 394,301 632,489 Beer,...

475

815 Linseed oil..

.gallons

591

66 Oil meal and cake..

. lbs.

79,859 85,165 Starch

144,054 135,734 Leather

885,080 1,148,068 1,230,572 Furniture...

111,631 110,180 105,672 Agricultural implements..

777 15,840 Bar and pig lead...

503 4,800

820 Pig iron......

96,362 52,769 67,563 Castings..

47,428 74,350 Machines and parts

27,895 15,331 Bloom and bar iron

558,120 442,508 668,985 Iron ware

52,131

111 Domestic woolens.

895,991 891,204 725,419 Domestic cotton

698,816 558,532 539,312 Domestic salt.....

73,666 52,612 56,975 Foreign salt...

5,311 1,196

OTHER ARTICLES. Live cattle, hogs, and sheep...

lbs.

47,349 26,100 Stone, lime, and clay...

74,060 118,482 139,882 Gypsum.

5,742 14,949 19,339 Eggs.

197,544 220,945 Mineral coal.

56,633 90,951 102,282 Fish.

14,319 12,547 Copper oro.

15,747 62,667 Flint enameled ware

240 Sundries .....

2,183,548 1,823,914 2,205,495 STATEMENT SHOWING THE AGGREGATE VALUE OF THE PROPERTY WHICH CAME TO THE

HUDSON RIVER, ON ALL THE CANALS, DURING THE YEARS 1849, 1850, 1851, UNDEE THE DIVISIONS AS SPECIFIED IN THE ABOVE TABLE.

1849.
1850.

1851. The forest

$7,192,796 $10,316,117 $10,380,259 Agriculture...

38,455,456 38,311,546 36,520,296 Manufactures.

3,899,238 3,960,854 4,355,907 Merchandise

508,048
563,616

406,711 Other articles

2,319,983 2,323,495 2,789,257

Total

$52,375,521

$66,474,637

$64,452,480

GALENA AND CHICAGO UNION RAILROAD. The Galena and Chicago Union Railroad now extends from Galena to Cherry Valley, a distance of 84 miles, and has two branch roads. It is among the most profitable roads in the west, from an advertisement in the Chicago Democrat we learn that this road has declared a half-yearly dividend of eight per cent on the capital stock paid in of the first division of the road. This makes the entire dividend for the fiscal year 1861-2, equal to fifteen per cent, beside leaving a large surplus of cash on hand.

The following table shows the earnings of the entire road and branches for the past three fiscal years. In the month of May, 1849, are included the earuings of March and April preceding. The cars commenced running in March, 1849.

1849–50.

1850–51. 1851-52. May.

$1,231 83 $10,826 01 $16,122 14 June

913 35

9,953 40 18,886 20 July..

1,602 52

9,715 62 19,096 68 August,

2,743 13

7,777 28 14,360 96 September..

4,267 43 14,058 85 19,443 26 October

7,106 03 17,641 40 24,918 14 November..

5,899 48 12,653 11 19,301 10 December...

5,008 21 12,520 96 18,632 48 January..

5,356 46 11,593 39 18,667 38 February..

5,132 62

6,172 34 21,859 16 March...

4,985 81 14,523 66

24,559 50 April..

6,008 67 13,096 96 20,825 35

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Buffalo.

Cents.

Lock.

TOLLS, TRADE, AND TONNAGE OF THE CANALS. The following statement, condensed from the late report of the Auditor of the Canal Department, presents an exhibit for several years of the average tonnage of the boat, of the time necessary to make a passage, and the cost to bring a barrel of flour from Buffalo to Albany, of the lockages at Alexander's lock, and the total tons delivered at tide-water from the Erie Canal, and of the total tolls, is as follows:

Average Days betw'n Fr't on a Lockages at Tons delivered at Years,

tonnage Albany & bbl. flour. Alexander's tide-water from Total. of boat.

Erie Canal.

tolls. 1841...

41
9

30,320 532,520 $2,034,882 1844. 49

60 28,219 790,816 2,446,374 1847...

67 104 77 43,957 1,431,252 3,639,381 1848. 71

58 34,911 1,164,337 3,262,213 1849.

68

84 56 36,918 1,266,724 3,268,226 1860. 76

58 38,444 1,554,675 3,273,896 1851.... 78 84 49 40,396 1,507,677 3,329,737

A comparison of the results of the last year's business with that of 1841, ten years ago, shows that while the boat has nearly doubled its capacity, the time necessary to make a passage from Buffalo to Albany is diminished half a day, transportation is cheapened 30 per cent, or 22 cents on a barrel of flour; and that while the lockages at Alexander's Lock have increased only 33 per cent, the tons arriving have increased 200 per cent. And that though the tons arriving from the Erie Canal last year are 77,000 more than in 1847, the lockages are 3,600 less.

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THE PHILOSOPHICAL RAILROAD ENGINEER. George Stanford, an engineer on the Michigan Central Railroad, at the time of a late accident on that road, had his head cut badly and his back bruised. Before the collision took place, but when it was too late to obviate it, he exclaimed: “This is all carelessness, and if I am killed, it will serve me right, I will not jump off.” That engineer was an honest man, and an intelligent believer in that beautiful Providence that works no miracle to save men from the consequences of transgressing wise laws.

MAINE LAW CONCERNING RAILROADS. The following act concerning railroads passed by the Legislature of Maine, was approved by the Governor on the 13th of April, 1852, and takes effect from and after October 13th, 1862.

AN ACT CONCERNING RAILROADS. Sec. 1. It is hereby declared that no railroad company has or shall have the right to assign its charter or any of its privileges, immunities or franchises, without the express authority of the legislature therefor; nor shall any railroad company, without such express authority, lease its road or any portion thereof, or grant the use and enjoyment thereof or any portion of the same, to any other person or corporation, or in any way grant the use, possession or control of the same to any other party or corporation, or in any way place the control and management of the said road in the hands of any other officers or parties than those contemplated by the charter. And any such lease, contract, agreement, assignment or transfer, heretofore or bereafter made, is hereby declared to be null and of no effect; and it shall be the duty of the Attorney General, on suggestion or request of any person complaining of a violation of the provisions of this act, by any, such corporation, to file an information, in the nature of a quo warranto, against said corporation before the Supreme Judical Court; and said court is authorized to pass such judgment, order, or decree, as to justice and equity may appertain in all such cases. And provided, that nothing in this act shall extend to any agreement

for the lease of the Somerset and Kennebec Railroad to the Kennebec and Portland Railroad, on the terms mutually agreed on by the stockholders in both of said companies ; nor to effect any mortgage made for securing the debts of any corporation, or with any portion of the Atlantic and St. Lawrence Railroad which lies within the States of New Hampshire and Vermont.

SEC. 2. This act shall take effect in six months from and after its approval by the Governor.

A PROFITABLE RAILROAD IN GEORGIA. The last report of the Georgia Railroad Company gives the same encouraging assurance of the value of the railway system, that all their previous reports have done.

Their road is 171 miles long, with 48 miles of branches, and they declare dividends on a capital stock of $4,000,000. They also have a debt, created by subscriptions to other railroad companies. These subscriptions amount to $570,890, and consist of the stocks of the Georgia and East Tennessee, Nashville and Chattanooga, Montgomery and West Point, Atlanta and Lagrange, and Rome Railroad Companies, and the Augusta and Nashville Telegraph Company. After paying interest on these debts, $52,691 65, the net profit remaining was $451,087 93, or 10.78 per cent on the capital. The company paid a dividend of 7 per cent, and devoted $151,087 93 to the payment of the debts. It is evident that without this debt created to aid other works calculated to benefit their road, the company might have declared a dividend of nearly 13 per cent. In fact, the business of this road has exhibited an actual profit of about 13 per cent for years past. The company have pursued the policy of subscribing to the stock of other roads, leading from their road to the interior. The debt created by these subscriptions will be paid off out of the profits of their road, in less than four years, and the company will enjoy largely increased profits, while their markets will command the tribute of Alabama and Tennessee,

THE FIRST AMERICAN LOCOMOTIVE. The Charleston Mercury says the first locomotive built in this country was constructed for and used on the South Carolina railroad.

“This engine would be a curiosity if placed alongside of one of Norris's or Baldwin's last improvements. It was named the ‘Best Friend,' and was built under the direction of Mr. E. L. Miller, of Walterboro', at the West Point Foundry of Messrs. Kemble, New York. The engine bad no tender, but carried its own wood and water. The wheels were of wood, with spokes like a wagon, and the wheel armed with & wrought-iron tire.

“The engineer who ran the first locomotive that was used on this or any other road in the United States, was N. K. Darrell, an apprentice brought up in Dotterer's Machine shop. He is now, and has been for many years past, the well-known and efficient master of the company's workshops in Charleston.

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