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29.-The Lost Senses, Deafness and Blindness. By John Kiri, T. D. 12 mo., pp.

377. New York: Robert Carter & Brothers.

The author of this volume and several others of importance, was, at an early period of his life, afflicted with blindness and deafness. His intellectual acquisitions were almost entirely made subsequently to this misfortune. Having thus suffered for a long period of his life from these evils, they necessarily became prominent subjects before his mind. He has consequently collected and arranged in these pages a large mass of facts in relation to individuals suffering under the loss of either of those senses. These are interspersed extensively with genial thoughts and reflections, all of which breathe a grave and devotional spirit. They are written in an interesting style and will afford both improvement and profit to a large number of readers. 30.Daily Bible Illustrations; being Original Readings for a Year on Subjects from

Sacred History, Biography, Geography, Antiquities, and Theology, especially designed for the Family Circle. By John KITTO, D. D. Evening Series. Isaiah and the Prophets. 12mo., pp. 418. Robert Carter & Brothers.

This volume completes the series of illustrations of the Old Testament by this author. It forms a very interesting compilation, and in the family circle is worthy to be regarded as one of the most valuable of the works iu explanation of the subjects of sacred history. 31.Lectures on the Works and Genius of Washington Alston. By WILLIAM WANE.

12mo., pp. 142. Boston: Phillips, Sampson & Co. The theme and the writer of this volume possess attractions of no ordinary interest. Alston the eminent painter, and Wane the accomplished scholar, are in conjunction. The contents are three lectures upon the genius of Alston and his “ Lesser and Larger" pictures. They are given to the public as they were left by the author at his decease. The criticism is an expression of the result of a long and delightful study of the subject, and conveys the candid impressions of the author. Every lover of the fine arts, or of true manliness and refined scholarship will delight to peruse these pages. 32.- Autobiography of Rev. Tobias Spicer ; Containing Incidents and Observations,

also some Account of His Visit to England. 12mo., pp. 309. New York: Lane & Scott.

At the Annual Conference of the Methodists at Troy, in 1847, a request was made that the author should prepare this volume with special reference to his experience, opinions, and observations, in relation to Methodism. His labors have been confined mostly to that conference, and the incidents related in the volume have occurred within his experience in those limits. The public is here presented with an intelligent outline of the practical operation of Methodism, and the general views entertained by the mass of those who conform to this system of religious faith. 33.— The Upper Ten Thousand; Sketches of American Society. By. C. Astor Bris

TED. Second Edition. 12mo., pp. 275. New York : Stringer & Townsend.

These sketches originally appeared in Frazer's London Magazine, and are reprinted here with the presumption, upon good evidence, that the name prefixed is that of the real author. They are lively, graphic delineations of high life in New York drawn with a pointed pen. 34.- Meyer's Universum, in Half-Monthly Parts, Illustrated with Drawings by the First Artists. Parts 5 and 6. New York: H. J. Meyer.

This is a very tasteful and elegant work. The illustrations are finely executed, and the literary matter is entertaining and instructive. These parts contain plates of “ Notre-Dame Cathedral,” “ Plato's School," " Hudson River near Newburg,” and “Calcutta;"

Roman Aqueduct in Segovia," " Chamouni Village and Valley," «Civita Castellina, Italy,” and “The Castle and Monastery of Illock, Hungary.” 35.-Boydell's Nlustrations of Shakspeare. Nos. 46, 47, 48, and 49. New York : J.

Spooner.

The wonderful engravings, of the elegance of which we have often spoken, are further continued in these numbers, which consist of a representation of Falstaff and Hal, in King Henry IV.; Southampton and Henry, in King Henry V.; Shakspeare nursed by Tragedy and Comedy; the Death of the Cardinal in Henry VI.; King Richard III. and the Prince, from the play of Richard III.; Desdemona Sleeping; a Field of Battle, from Henry VI.; and another view of Desdemona asleep.

36.--Northwood; or, Life at the North and South. By Mrs. SABAH J. Hale. Illus

trated. 12mo., pp. 999. New York: H. Long & Brother. This work is written in that genuine spirit of Christian philanthropy which knows no North and no South,” except as forming parts of one great and glorious Union, of which all the citizens, in every quarter, are brethren. It is marked by strong and excellent sense, is written in an animated and interesting style, and delineates with great fidelity and justness many of the striking traits both of Northern and Southern character. It does justice to the peculiar and embarrassing circumstances of the South, and sets forth many important principles, the practice of which would cement the Union, and foster the prosperity of all portions of the country. We are gratified, for the sake of the "good and gifted” author, to learn that there is a very extensive sale of this work. 37.The National Portrait Gallery of Distinguished Americans, with Biographi

cal Sketches, Containing upwards of One Hundred and Twenty Engraved Por. traits of the Most Eminent Persons in the History of the United States. 850. Nos. 1, 2, 3, and 4. Philadelphia : R. Peterson. New York: Wm. Terry.

The portraits contained in these numbers are those of Gen. Washington and his wife Martha, Thomas Jefferson, John Hancock, Chas. Carroll, W. Irving, Wm. White, John Marshall, Gen. Scott, Gen. Anthony Wayne, and Commodore MacDonough. They are executed with much taste and skill, and generally the resemblance to the best paintings of the originals is very correct. The biographical sketches are general, yet embrace all the leading incidents in the lives of each individual. 38.—The Art Journal for September and October. New York and London: Geo.

Virtue.

This unrivaled organ of the fine arts is embellished in its usual admirable style, and rich in artistic intelligence. The plates in the September number are " Lady Gadiva," from a picture in the Vernon Gallery; “Napoleon's Mother," from the statue by Canova; and the “Infant Bacchus," from a picture in the Vernon Gallery. In the October number the plates are “ The Tired Soldier," and "Cupid Bound,” from pictures in the Vernon Gallery; and the “Faithful Messenger," from the statue by Geets at Antwerp—with numerous illustrations also of German art. 39.—The Waverley Novels. Library Edition. Vols. X, and XI. Boston: B. B.

Mussey.

These volumes embrace “ Kenilworth” and “The Abbot.” The illustrations on wood are in the highest style of the art, and altogether this is one of the most desirable editions of the Scott novels that has yet been published. 40.- Waverley Novels. Black Dwarf” and “Old Mortality.” 8vo., pp. 124. Phila

delphia : A. Hart.

This is the cheapest edition of the Waverley Novels at present published. The appearance, typography, &c., is quite fair. 41.- The Old Engagement. A Spinster Story. By Julia Day. 12mo., pp. 215.

Boston: James Munroe & Co.

This is a simple narrative, the attraction of which must be chiefly sought for in the gracefulness and spirit with which it is related. 42.- The University Speaker; a Collection of Pieces Designed for College Exercises

in Recitation, with Suggestions on the Appropriate Elevation of Particular Passages. By WILLIAM Russell. 12mo., pp. 528. Boston: James Munroe & Co. The pieces in this volume consist of rhetorical, oratorical, and poetical extracts

. They are selected with judgment and good taste, forming a book as meritorious as any of the kind. 43.-Philosophers and Actresses. By ARSENE HOUSSAYE. 2 vols, 12mo., pp. 411 and

406. New York: J. S. Redfield.

These volumes should be regarded as a second part of the " Men and Women of the Eighteenth Century"-a work by the same author, which has recently appeared. They are written with the same taste and interesting style of narrative. Intermingled with the lives are prominent events of an influential kind, which were remarkable in the career of individnals. The volumes contain sketches of Voltaire, Mademoiselle Gaassin, Callat, Tardiff, Chamfort, Madame Parabere, Prudhon, and very many others.

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CONTENTS OF NO. VI., VOL. XXVII.

ARTICLES. ART.

PAGE. I, DEBTS AND FINANCES OF THE STATES OF THE UNION.-WITH REFERENCE

TO THEIR GENERAL CONDITION AND PROSPERITY.- CHAPTER IX.-THE WEST-
ERN STATES--ILLINOIS. By Tuomas P. KETTELL, of New York .......

659 IL, SUGAR: AND THE SUGAR TRADE.........

671 III, COMMERCIAL CITIES AND TOWNS OF THE UNITED STATES.-No. XXXIII. NEW YORK.- Part IV. By E. HALE, Jr., of New York.....

686 IV. MERCANTILE BIOGRAPHY.--JAMSETJEE JEEJEEBHOY-A PARSEE MERCHANT 694 V. TRADE AND COMMERCE OF MOBILE, 1851-52......

702

JOURNAL OF MERCANTILE LAW. Under what circumstances a foreign minister can sue and be sued in the United States......... 710

COMMERCIAL CHRONICLE AND REVIEW: EMBRACING A FINANCIAL AND COMMERCIAL REVIEW OF THE UNITED STATES, ETC., ILLUSTRA

TED WITH TABLES, ETO., AS FOLLOWS: General commercial prosperity -- Distinction between the spirit of enterprise and speculation

The danger of a thirst for sudden riches--Banks and bankers-Increase of new banks--Domestic trade and interior collections-Prices of stocks and bonds-Deposits and coinage at the Philadelphia and New Orleans Mints for October-Ditto at all the Mints since January 1st -Production of California gold, and export to Great Britain-Imports of foreign merchandise at New York for October and from January 18k-Classification of imports, with the receipts of foreign dry goods- Revenue of the country-Cash receipts at the port of New York-Exports from New York for October, and from June 1st-Shipments of leading articles of produce-Diversion of shipping to Australia, and consequent advance in rates of freigbt... 713-720 VOL. XXVII.—NO. VI.

42

.............. 730

730

COMMERCIAL STATISTICS.

PAOL. Production and consumption of cotton...

721 Export of leather, boots, and shoes from the United States.. Virginia Tobacco trade, 1851-52. .... Advance in the price of sperm and wbale oils..

723 The butter trade of Cincinnati. Prices of tobacco in New Orleans. The pork trade of Cincinnati... Agricultural statistics of the United States...

728
The trade and revenue of Ireland..
Receipts of produce by the new canal at New Orleans.
Shipments of brandy from Charente to Great Britain.......

COMMERCIAL REGULATIONS.
Postal treaty between the United States and Prussia..
Signals for ships ordered by Sweden......
Tribunals of Commerce........

732 Method of putting up produce for market..

733 Ship building in Louisiana.-of ocean postage.

735 The passengers' act of the United Kingdom.- Reduction of export duty at Turk's Island...

736 JOURNAL OF BANKING, CURRENCY, AND FINANCE. Capital and dividends of New York city banks... Production of Precious metals in the world

738 Progress of the British penny postage system..

739 Receipts and expenditures of the United States..

740 United States treasurer's statement, October 25, 1852.... Banks under the general banking law of Illinois.-Gold and silver in the Bank of England.. 749 British post-office system of remitting money.-Shipments of gold dust from San Francisco..... 743 Weighing department of the Bank of England

NAUTICAL INTELLIGENCE. The American Nautical Almanac...

744 of entering the channel of the Bay of Smyrna.-or the light on the Island of Seiro.

745 South Foreland High Light.-Directions for sailing into and out of Harbor Grace...

746 West Coast of Jutland, and the Coasts of Bornholm.-Detention of vessels at Hampton Roads.. 746

JOURNAL OF MINING AND MANUFACTURES. The first mining operations in North America....

747 The manufacture of glass.- No. iv. By DEMING Jarvis, Esq., of Massachusetts....

749 Industrial progress of Georgia...

751 Statistical account of tanneries in the United States, compared with the returns of 1850.

752 Manufacture of ladies' muffs in London.-Items of gold mining in California..

753 Progress of British cotton manufactories...

753 Production of Indigo in South Carolina....

734 RAILROAD, CANAL, AND STEAMBOAT STATISTICS. Florence and Keyport plank road..

754 Cost and expenses of seven railroads of Massachusetts for the years 1850 and 1851. Statistics of Massachusetts Railroads...

756

757 Rates of freight on the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad Influence of railroads on Agriculture

758

759 Persons employed on railways in England...

760 Key West as a depot for California steamers..

761 STATISTICS OF POPULATION. Emigration from the United Kingdom....... Population and territory of the Austrian empire in 1851.

764 MERCANTILE MISCELLANIES. “Naval dry-docks of the United States.". Mercantile Library....

766

767 of the tax or duty on foreign coal..

767 Talleyrand and the banker

768 Invention for Negro clothing

768 The banker's Saturday night..

769 An eye to business.. A creditor's stratagem to collect a debt. No antagonism between capital and labor..

769 American trade in India

770 THE BOOK TRADE. Notices of new books, or new editions.....

771-776

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770

HUNT'S

MERCHANTS' MAGAZINE

AND

COMMERCIAL REVIEW.

DECEMBER, 1852.

Art. 1.- DEBTS AND FINANCES OF THE STATES OF TIE UNION.

WITH REFERENCE TO THEIR GENERAL CONDITION AND PROSPERITY.

CHAPTER IX.

The Western StatesNlinois.

Among all the States of the Union which succumbed to the financial storm of 1836-40, none had more canvas spread, or so little ballast, as that gem of the West, Illinois ; nevertheless, none has more promptly recovered its position, or more satisfactorily responded to the hopes of its friends, or the wishes of its creditors. The locality of Illinois is highly favorable for the development of its great natural resources, under the influence of modern improvements. The north-eastern extremity borders Lake Michigan.

• The first of this series of papers was published in the Merchants' Magazine and Commercial Review for November, 1847, (vol. xvii., page 466.) That article, an introduction to the series, related chiefly to the State debts of Europe and of the United States. It was followed in the number for December, 1847, (vol. xvii., page 577,) by an article on the New England States, embracing Maine and Massachusetts; and in March, 1848, a vol. xviii., page 243,) by New York; in March, 1849, (vol. xx., page 256,) by Pennsylvania; in May, 1849, (vol. XX., page 481,) by Maryland; in August, 1849, (vol. xxi., page 148,) by Indiana; in October, 1849, (vol. xxi., page 389,) by Ohio; and in the number for February, 1850, (vol. xxii., page :31,) by an article on Michigan. The series, it will be seen by reference to the preceding chapters, with the exception of the first, published in November, 1847, have all appeared under the same general title prefixed to the present chapter. The articles contain the most comprehensive and reliable account of the debts, finances, and resources of the several States, that have ever been grouped in a connected and convenient form for reference -present and future.

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