Слике страница
PDF
ePub

RELATIONS BETWEEN THE
UNITED STATES AND

GERMANY
AUGUST 1, 1914-APRIL 6, 1917

BASED ON OFFICIAL DOCUMENTS

BY

JAMES BROWN SCOTT

Doctor of Jurisprudence of the University of Heidelberg: Technical Delegate of the United States
to the Second Hague Peace Conference, Member of the Institute of International Law :
President of the American Institute of International Law. Major and Judo.

Advocate, United States Reserves

Rnow once and for all that in the matter of kingcraft we take when we
can, and that we are never wrong unless we have to give back what we
have taken.

- FREDERICK THE GREAT: Les Matinées Royales, circa 1764.
The true honor and dignity of the Nation are inseparable from justice.

-ALBERT GALLATIN: Peace with Mexico, 1847.

NEW YORK
OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS

AMERICAN BRANCH : 85 WEST SEND STREET
LONDON, TORONTO, MELBOURNE, AND BOMBAY

1917

[blocks in formation]

RESPECTFULLY DEDICATED TO THE HONORABLE ROBERT LANSING,
SECRETARY OF STATE OF THE UNITED STATES, AND
THROUGH HIM TO HIS COUNTRYMEN AND TO ALL
PARTISANS OF JUSTICE BETWEEN NATIONS,
WHOSE CAUSE HE HAS FINELY STATED

AND FAITHFULLY SERVED

380473

The publishers announce, separate and distinct from, but to be used in connection with the present volume, the Diplomatic Correspondence between the United States and Germany from August 1, 1914, to April 6, 1917, the date of the declaration of a state of war by the Congress of the United States against the Imperial German Government, and President Wilson's Messages, Addresses, and Papers on Foreign Policy. These volumes are of the same format as the Survey of International Relations between the United States and Ger. many, 1914-1917, and they are edited by its author.

The differences of opinion, crystallizing into opposition, and resulting eventually in war between the United States and Germany, are stated clearly, unmistakably, and officially in the Diplomatic Correspondence between the two Governments since the outbreak of the European War in 1914, and up to the declaration of war by the United States because of the controversies between the two countries. The Diplomatic Correspondence makes the case of the United States, just as the Diplomatic Correspondence is the defense of Germany. Upon this Correspondence each country rests its case, and upon this Correspondence each is to be judged. It is thought best to present it in a volume by itself, disconnected from narrative or from correspondence with other belligerent nations, which would indeed have been interesting but not material to the present case.

President Wilson's views upon foreign policy were important during the neutrality of the United States, and it is even more important to understand them now, inasmuch as they are the views of the United States at war and indicate in no uncertain way the attitude which the United States under President Wilson's guidance may be expected to assume in the negotiations which must one day bring about peace to a long-suffering and war-ridden world. This volume is of interest to Mr. Wilson's countrymen; it is of interest to the belligerents; it is of interest to the neutrals, whose cause Mr. Wilson has championed.

The publishers have pleasure in announcing that the author of “A Survey of International Relations between the United States and Germany" and editor of “President Wilson's Messages, Addresses, and Papers on Foreign Policy” and of the “Diplomatic Correspondence,has directed that the royalties due him be presented to the Department of State War Relief Work Committee, of which Mrs. Robert Lansing is President.

OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS

American Branch September 16, 1917.

« ПретходнаНастави »