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COMMITTEE ON APPROPRIATIONS

GEORGE H. MAHON, Texas, Chairman JAMIE L. WHITTEN, Mississippi

ELFORD A. CEDERBERG, Michigan JOHN J. ROONEY, New York

WILLIAM E. MINSHALL, Ohio ROBERT L. F. SIKES, Florida

ROBERT H. MICHEL, Illinois OTTO E. PASSMAN, Louisiana

SILVIO O. CONTE, Massachusetts JOE L. EVINS, Tennessee

GLENN R. DAVIS, Wisconsin EDWARD P. BOLAND, Massachusetts HOWARD W. ROBISON, New York WILLIAM H. NATCHER, Kentucky

GARNER E. SHRIVER, Kansas DANIEL J. FLOOD, Pennsylvania

JOSEPH M. McDADE, Pennsylvania TOM STEED, Oklahoma

MARK ANDREWS, North Dakota GEORGE E. SHIPLEY, Illinois

LOUIS C. WYMAN, New Hampshire JOHN M. SLACK, West Virginia

BURT L. TALCOTT, California JOHN J. FLYNT, JR., Georgia

WENDELL WYATT, Oregon NEAL SMITH, Iowa

JACK EDWARDS, Alabama ROBERT N. GIAIMO, Connecticut

WILLIAM J. SCHERLE, Iowa JULIA BUTLER HANSEN, Washington ROBERT C. McEWEN, New York JOSEPH P. ADDABBO, New York

JOHN T. MYERS, Indiana JOHN J. McFALL, California

J. KENNETH ROBINSON, Virginia EDWARD J. PATTEN, New Jersey

CLARENCE E. MILLER, Ohio CLARENCE D, LONG, Maryland

EARL B. RUTH, North Carolina SIDNEY R. YATES, Illinois

VICTOR V. VEYSEY, California BOB CASEY, Texas

LAWRENCE COUGHLIN, Pennsylrania FRANK E. EVANS, Colorado

C. W. BILL YOUNG, Florida
DAVID R. OBEY, Wisconsin
EDWARD R. ROYBAL, California
LOUIS STOKES, Ohio
J. EDWARD ROI'SH, Indiana
GUNN MCKAY, Utah
TOM BEVILL, Alabama
EDITH GREEN, Oregon
ROBERT 0. TIERNAN, Rhode Island
BILL CHAPPELL, JR., Florida
BILL D. BURLISON, Missouri

KEITH F. JAINLAND, Clerk and Staff Director

STAFF ASSISTANTS
GORDON E, CASEY
AMERICO S. MICONI

KAREX J. SCHUBECK
NICHOLAS G. CATAROCCHI DEMPSEY B. MIZELLE

EARL C. SILSBY
GEORGE E. EVANS
ExID MORRISON

G. HOWER SKARIN
ROBERT B. FOSTER
PETER J. MURPHY, Jr.

C. WILLIAM SMITH
JOHN M. GARRITY
HENRY A. NEIL, Jr.

CHARLES W. SXODGRASS AUBREY A. GUNNELS

ROBERT C. NICHOLAS III HCXTER L. SPILLAN
CHARLES G. HARDIN
BYRON S. NIELSON

PAUL E. THOMSON
F. MICHAEL HUGO
JOHN G. (STHAUS

GEORGE A. TRIAX
THOMAS J. KINGFIELD
FREDERICK F. PFLUGER

DEREK J. VANDER SCHAAF
ROBERT L. KNISELY
JOHN G. PLASHAL

EUGENE B. WILHELM
EDWARD E. LOMBARD
EDWIN F. POWERS

J. DAVID WILLSON
RICHARD N. MALOW

SAMUEL R. I'RESTON
MILTON B. MEREDITH

DONALD E. RICHBOURG
SURVEYS AND INVESTMENTS

C. R. ANDERSON, Chief
DAVID B. SCHMIDT, Director
DENNIS F. CREEDON, First Assistant

MARION S. RAMEY, Second Assistant Xote.—This Surreys and Investigations supervisory staff is supplemented by selected personnel borrowed on a reimbursable basis for varying lengths of time from various agencies to staff up specific studies and investigations. The current average annual fulltime personnel equivalent is approximately 42.

ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT
GERARD J. CHOU'IXARD MARCIA L. MATTS

AUSTIN G. SMITH
PAUL V. FARMER
FRANCES MAY

CHRISTINE STOCKMAN
SANDRA A. GILBERT
GENEVIEVE A. MEALY

AXX M. STI'LL
Eva K. HARRIS
JANE A. MEREDITH

RANDOLPH THOMAS
PATRICIA A. KEMP

LAWRENCE C. MILLER GEMMA M. WEIBLINGER VIRGINIA MAY KEYSER DALE M. SHULAW

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JOHN W. INGRAM, FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATOR
HENRI F. RUSH, JR., DEPUTY FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINIS-

TRATOR
DONALD W. BENNETT, CHIEF COUNSEL
MILTON KLEIN, ASSOCIATE ADMINISTRATOR FOR RESEARCH,

DEVELOPMENT AND DEMONSTRATIONS MAC E. ROGERS, ASSOCIATE ADMINISTRATOR FOR SAFETY FREDERICK G. BREMER, ASSOCIATE ADMINISTRATOR FOR ADMIN

ISTRATION WILLIAM E. LOFTUS, ACTING ASSOCIATE ADMINISTRATOR FOR

POLICY AND PLANS WILBERT E. CANTEY, ACTING ASSOCIATE ADMINISTRATOR FOR

ECONOMICS WALKER S. JOHNSTON, GENERAL MANAGER, THE ALASKA RAIL

ROAD ROY M. COLLEY, BUDGET OFFICER RICHARD W. SLOCUM, DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF THE BUDGET, OFFICE

OF THE SECRETARY

Mr. McFall. The committee will come to order.

We will begin the testimony on the budget request of the Federal Railroad Administration. Our principal witness is the Administrator, John W. Ingram.

Mr. Ingram, we will be glad to hear your statement at this time.

GENERAL STATEMENT

Mr. INGRAM. Mr. Chairman, I am again pleased to be before your mmittee, and to present the Federal Railroad Administration's appropriation request for fiscal year 1973).

This is my 3d year before the committee, and I believe you will : uree that in that period the problems besetting railroad transportation have become very visible, significant public issues.

Beginning in 1970, (Congress has enacted major rail legislation at €2 i session. The legislation included action on intercity passenger

Tulce, safety standards, loans to bankrupt carriers, loans to restore torni damaged rail facilities, and, of course, the Regional Rail Reorganization Act passed late last year. This year, hopefully, C'ongress wil act on the administration's recommendations regarding regulatory benges and general rail assistance.

These legislative actions and the activities and programs initiated rinder them illustrate the fact that the public sector is very much in

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volved—and will likely continue to be involved for some time to comein solving rail transportation problems and in promoting the most efficient use of rail transportation. The growth of the public sector's role in rail transportation matters centers on the Federal Railroad Administration's activities and programs. The budget requests that we have submitted to the committee reflect our response to critical problems affecting the rail industry and those who look to it for service and employment. This year more than ever, they also reflect our response to the increasing public demand for energy-efficient and environmentally sound solutions to transportation problems.

The Federal Railroad Administration has a major role in dealing with the critical issues requiring immediate solutions as well as participating in the determination of the appropriate long-term role of rail transportation within the country's overall transportation system.

For example, FRA people developed the basic approach used in the Secretary's report containing recommendations for a revitalized railroad network in the Midwest and Northeast, and we also developed the data base and analytical methodology. On a continuing basis, FRA is responsible for the grant and loan programs authorized by the Northeast rail legislation. We are developing the program related to rail service continuation subsidies made available to States under the act. We will be working closely with States to help them in dereloping rail planning capabilities. Of course, we are active in the development of the Northeast corridor improvements as required by the act.

These are perhaps the more visible and direct activities of FRA, but I am more concerned that we continue the path we charted a few years ago when we started the long needed railroad research program. The attention we have focused on economie, operational, and technological factors that influence our rail systems is beginning to pay dividends.

We are now able to better understand rail problems and articulate them for the ('ongress, the community of users, and for the industry itself.

The specifics of where we've been and where we are going will be part of our discussion of the budget. I think it is important to note that your committee gave us the necessary support to structure this railroacl research program and to begin looking for solutions and supporting the decisionmaking process in both the public and private sectors.

OPERATING EXPENSES This appropriation represents a consolidation of three appropriations authorized in fiscal year 1974 which were : Office of the Administrator, salaries and expenses; railroad safety; and crants-in-aid for railroad safety. This consolidation is consistent with the desires to rationalize the appropriation structure for our programs, while at the same time maintaining the integrity of the major efforts included within the appropriation.

An amount of $15.760,000 in budget authority, or $2.060,000 over fiscal year 1974, is requested for furthering the effective investigation and enforcement of Federal railroad safety rules and regulations;

assisting the States in carrying out a railroad safety program; and increasing employment for supporting staff to improve FRA capability to fulfill its expanding missions in finding solutions to the rail industry problems.

GENERAL MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION The request provides for a net increase of 14 positions under this activity (21 new positions and a decrease of 7 positions which are proposed for transfer to the railroad research and development appropriation). The 21 new positions are to improve FRA's capability, through its in-house staff efforts, to fulfill its expanding missions in finding solutions to the rail industry problems as they relate to increased emphasis being placed on the role of rail transportation in the economy; the requirement in the public interest for increased safety operations; the need for increased efficiency within the industry; and the need for finding ways that the rail industry can contribute toward lessening the impact of the energy crisis, such as achieving more efficient use of fuels.

RAILROAD SAFETY, FEDERAL PROGRAM Under this activity, we are requesting an increase of $1,320,000 over the fiscal year 1974 level of $8,900,000, the major part of which is for rental of office space (previously paid for by GŜA) and annualization of employment. We are making progress in this area. To illustrate, we have:

Developed a system for assigning FRA inspectors based on where the problem is.

Published track safety standards and regulations which became fully effective October 16, 1973.

Published freight car safety standards and regulations, as of November 21, 1973, covering three basic areas: Inspection standards, lubrication standards, prohibited equipment.

Prepared, in draft form, proposed regulations on employee physical qualifications, alcohol and drugs, and certain railroad operating rules.

Made other efforts, as discussed in the justification. Our goal is to have 66 additional inspectors on board by June 30.

GRANTS TO STATES FOR RAILROAD SAFETY

FRA began holding meetings in February 1974 with groups of State representatives throughout the country to review with them provisions of the regulations and to assist those interested in preparing for certification. The initial certification will cover track safety. Those State track inspectors who are fully qualified will be given a minimum of instruction and on-the-job training, and then be immediately utilized as inspectors. Other State inspectors will be given orientation, training courses in their specialties, and on-the-job training to make them fully effective as soon as possible.

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