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å. S. Exploring Expeditions.

I.

PERSONAL NARRATIVE OF EXPLORATIONS AND INCIDENTS IN TEXAS, NEW MEXICO, CALIFORNIA,

SONORA, AND CHIHUAHUA."

Connected with the Mexican Boundary Commission, during the years 1850, '51, '52, and '53.

By Hon. JOHN RUSSELL BARTLETT,
UNITED STATES COMMISSIONER DURING THAT PERIOD.

In 2 vols. 8vo., of nearly 600 pages each, price $5, printed with large type and on extra fine paper, to

be illustrated with nearly 100 Woodcuts, sixteen Tinted Lithographs, and a beautiful Map en

graved on steel, of the extensive regions traversed. In addition to the interest connected with the explorations of our newly acquired territories and the Mexican States adjacent, this work possesses unusual attraction from the detailed account which it contains of one of tho proposed routes for a railroad from the Atlantic to the Pacific. The author traversed tho country near the parallel of 32 degrees North latitude, for five hundred miles through Texas, and about three hundred miles west of the Rio Grande, in the States of Chihuahua and Sonora, near the same line. In these two States, which are now attracting the deepest interest, be made extensive journeys through their entire length, and describes with great minuteness the natural features of tho country, so that, as a guide to emigrants to these States or to California, the information will be invaluable.

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II.

NICARAGUA; ITS PEOPLE, SCENERY, MONUMENTS, AND THE PROPOSED INTEROCEANIC CANAL

WITH NUMEROUS ORIGINAL MAPS AND ILLUSTRATIONS.

By E. G. SQUIER,
LATE CHARGE D'AFFAIRES OF THE UNITED STATES TO THE REPUBLICS OF CENTRAL AMERICA.

2 vols. 8vo., beautifully printed, $5; or, in 1 vol., $4 50.

III.

THE ISTHMUS OF TEHUANTEPEC:

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Being the Results of a Survey for a Railroad to connect the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, made by the

SCIENTIFIO COMMISSION, under the direction of
MAJOR J. G. BARNARD, UNITED STATES ENGINEER.

WITH A RESUME OF THE

Geology, Climate, Local Geography, Productive Industry, Fauna and Flora, of the Region.

ILLUSTRATED WITH NUMEROUS MAPS AND ENGRAVINGS.
Arranged and prepared for the Tehuantepec Railroad Company of New Orleans,

By J. J. WILLIAMS, Prin. Assist. Eng.

One volume, 8vo., with Atlas separate, price $3 50.

PÆDIA

A NEW, CHEAP, AND MOST VALUABLE ENCYCLOPÆDIA.

D. APPLETON & CO.
Have in course of Publication in consort with the London Publishers,
THE ENGLISH CYCLOPÆDIA.

A New Dictionary of Universal Knowledge.
Illustrated with Upwards of Five Thousand Wood Engravings,

EDITED BY MR. CHARLES KNIGHT.
Many of the articles written by the most Eminent Scholars and Scientific Men of the Day.

Upon completing the first two volumes of the “The English CYCLOPÆDIA namely, one of Geography, and one of Natural History—the public attention to the distinctive character of this work is respectfully requested by the Publishers.

“The English CYCLOPÆDIA,” as now announced, is based upon “The Penny Cyclopædia of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge.” The copyright of that great work being the property of Mr. Knight, he alone had the power of remodelling it throughout, so as to adapt the original materials to the existing state of knowledge. The amount of literary labor which this adaptation has involved will at once be seen by any one who will compare the present work with the original. It has not been a labor merely of correction and revision; it has involved the necessity of introducing a great body of newly-written matter. The changes which have elapsed since “The Penny Cyclopædia was commenced, twenty years ago, have rendered every branch of information in some degree a new study. In “The EnglisII CYCLO

no diligence has been spared to collect every fact not previously recorded; to systematize articles that from the long course of publication of the original work were disconnected to make the references complete ; and truly to present, as far as a “DicTIONARY OF UNIVERSAL KNOWLEDGE can present, the advanced opinions of our own times.

During the progress of its completion, it has become more and more evident that the plan of issuing “THE English CYCLOPÆDIA” in Four Divisions is a judicious arrangement. It has the obvious advantage of completing, in a comparatively short space of time, large departments of knowledge with the most recent information. Finishing the great branches of Geography and Natural History in two years, the beginning and the end of each series will not present different aspects, the one somewhat antiquated, the other perfectly fresh. The editorial labor, too, being more condensed, the relations and proportions of each article and subject can be better preserved. The old materials were of the highest value; but the edifice required to be rebuilt; and thus “The English CYCLOPÆDIA” is essentially a new Cyclopædia; not only taking a new form, but now in all the ossentials of literary novelty.

It is necessary to add, that an Atlas to accompany the Geographical Division of “The English CYCLOPÆDIA” will be prepared; but as it will not be an isolated collection of Maps, but one adapted to the text of the Cyclopædia, it will not be issued till the work is more advanced ; and thus the most recent information will be therein embodied.

“The English CYCLOPEDIA ” will be comprised in four Divisions, each having its own alphabetical arrangement, and each forming, when complete, four distinct volumes. GEOGRAPHY,

4 vols., IIIstorY, BIOGRAPHY, LITERATURE, &c., 4 vols, NATURAL HISTORY,

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4 vols. SCIENCES AND Arts,
Now ready, price $2 50 each, handsomely and strongly bound in cloth

VOL. I. OF THE GEOGRAPHICAL DIVISION, AND

VOL. I. OF THE NATURAL HISTORY DIVISION, Subscribers names solicited. All persons subscribing must engage to take the complete work.

4 vols,

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NOTICES OF THE PRESS. “A decidedly happy production for all "Each chapter begins with a smile and who love fun and novelty. The author of ends with à horse laugh.”—Troy Daily a work like this need not stop to make Times. apologies. There is a spice of real wit "Since the publication of Judge Long. throughout the book that renders it greatly street's Georgia Scenes, we have had nothing attractive, while the subjects are of interest more amusing than some sketches in this to every body, not even excepting the wor- volume. We bave laughed consumedly over thy members of the legal profession. To all the narratives in this volume, which is we say, get and read this book.”—Daily illustrated by a clever artist.”Buffalo Daily Pennsylvanian, Phila.

Courier. “One of the most entertaining books we “They are brim full of humor, “Laughter" have read in a long time.”—National Demo- must “hold both his sides” while reading crat, New-York.

them. We predict for it most flattering fa“This is a series of dashing, graphic, and vor."- Western Literary Messenger. able sketches of men, manners, habits, scenes, “His pictures of Life in the West, at the incidents, accidents, and events which passed time it was newly settled and comparatively before the author's observation, while prac- uncivilized, are inimitable. No one could tising law and studying the world in Ala- procure a more efficient book for expelling bama and Mississippi.”— Worcester Daily the blues. Let all hypocondriacs and unSpy.

fortunate persons of that class purchase the “There is not a page of the book that is work instanter. It must cure them." not invested with the deepest interest, and Southern Literary Messenger. which will serve to beguile a weary hour “This is one of the most entertaining vol. with reading of the most entertaining kind.” umes of the season ; for a winter evening or -Commercial Advertiser.

a rainy day, it is a charming book. It will “We are but giving an expression to a chase away the blues," fill the mind with widely entertained opinion, when we say, pleasant and agreeable fancies, and rob life that they are the very best things of the kind of its cares. Baldwin, the author, is a dethat the age has produced. The drollery of lightful writer. His style is fresh, free, and the writer is irresistible; but apart from flowing. He draws his characters to nathis, there are graces of style which belong ture.”Lynchburg Virginia. peculiarly to him. •The Virginians in a “One of the best things in the season. New Country' is worthy of Goldsmith in its Portraits drawn, con amore, of bench and easy and quiet satire, and its smooth descrip-bar, where prominently figures our old actions." --Southern Literary Messenger. quaintance, Simon Suggs, Esq. Mr. Bald

“A book which will be in great demand.” win ranks, intellectually, and as a lawyer, - Winchester Republican.

among the very first men in the State, and “This book will be good any where, but for dry, and genial humor, we know not his in Alabama and Mississippi it will be read superior in the South."- Mobile Daily Adv. with an appreciative gusto which few in this "One of the most mirth-provoking little latitude can comprehend.”—Springfield Re- works we ever met with."-- Louisville Jour. publican.

“ As a delineation of character and inci“It would provoke laughter from the dent developed by the Flush Times, this saddest phiz.”Lansingburg Gazette. book is a verity, corroborated by the recol

". It abounds in sparkling wit and irre- lection of every observant man of those days sistible humour, and to members of the bar It is truly an admirable performance, evincparticularly, must prove a source of much ing abilities of a very high order. Brilliant merriment.”—Newark Daily Adveriiser. as its wit and irresistible as its humor are,

"There is a vein of quiet humor running one sees that they are among the rich gifts through the whole; and as the volume con- with which nature has lavishly endowed the tains 330 pages, the reader may be sure of author. He is a man to write books to en830 laughs alone to himself before he reaches dure. The gambols of his genius, in a merely the conclusion. A friend of ours says that frolic mood, indicate the power and the grace he considers him his greatest benefactor who which capacitate him, when he chooses to can make him laugh the most."- Worcester take high rank on the roll of American av. Palladium

thors "-Chambers' Tribune, Ala.

THE WORKS OF JOHN C. CALHOUN.

D. APPLETON & COMPANY

HAVE IN COURSE OF PUBLICATION,

THE WORKS

OF

JOHN C. CALHOUN,

NOW FIRST COLLECTED.

TO BE HANDSOMELY PRINTED IN OCTAVO VOLUMES

THE FOLLOWING WILL BE THE ORDER OF PUBLICATION:

L

ON THE CONSTITUTION AND GOVERNMENT OF THE UNITED STATES

(NOW READY.)

1

SPEECHES IN CONGRESS.

DIPLOMATIC PAPERS AND CORRESPONDENCE.

IV.

HIS LIFE.

CALHOUN, Clay, and WEBSTER are three naines which will long be venerated by American Citizens. Of the three, Calhoun, during the early part of his life, was perhaps the greatest favorite with the people. His highiy cultivated mind, profound views of government, and his pure character, gave great weight and importance to his opinions with all parties. Of the writings and speeches of American statesmen, there are scarcely any which bear so directly upon the great measures adopted by our Government, during the last forty years, as thuse of the lamented Calhoun. The War, the Revenue System, the Currency, and States Rights, were subjects upon which he took a leading position, and greatly aided the decisions which were made on them. With those who take an interest in our national history, the value of the writings of our public men cannot be too highly estimated.

The works of Calhoun will follow each other rapidly from the press. Hir friends who are desirous of procuring them, are invited a subscribe without delay The terms are two dollars per volume, payable on deliver

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