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The value of goods thrown upon the market shows a less relative decline than the value entered at the port, from the fact, as already stated, that the withdrawals from warehouse have been larger than the entries. We annex, also, a comparison of the receipts of dry goods at the same port since January 1st :

IMPORTS OF DRY GOODS AT THE PORT OF NEW YORK FOR SEVEN MONTHS ENDING JULY 30.

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Total entered at the port...... $40,414,677 $42,240,217 $34,994,294 The receipts for duties continue to decline, although not in the same proportion as the imports, the payments upon the stock taken from warehouse having otherwise added to the revenue. We annex a comparison of the total from the 1st of January for three years :

RECEIPTS FOR DUTIES AT NEW YORK.

January 1st to March 31 st.....
April 1st to June 30th
July....

1850.
$6,996,656 48
6,033,253, 57
4,210,115 95

1851.
$9,295,257 30
7,357,408 30
3,658,400 12

1852.
$7,617,887 72
6,632,425 16
3,240,787 18

Total since January 1st.... $17,240,026 00 $20,211,065 72 $17,491,100 06 The revenue of the United States for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1852, is about $2,500,000 less than for the preceding year, as will be seen by the following comparative statement, to which we also annex a summary of the imports for the last four years, the figures for 1852 being estimated from the duties, in anticipation of the official returns :

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Years.

Dutiable.

Free.

Total. 1852

$178,000,000 $25,000,000 $203,000,000 1851

191,118,345 25,106,587 216,224,932 1850

155,427,936 22,710,382 178,138,318 1849

125,479,774 22,377,665 147,857,439 Considering the diminished imports, it would be but reasonable to expect a corresponding decline in the exports, but this has not thus far been realized, judging from the returns at the same port. The exports from New York to foreign ports for July have indeed fallen off from last year in the item of specie, but in the value of produce and merchandise there is no material difference.

!

EXPORTS FROM NEW YORK TO FOREIGN PORTS FOR JULY.

dutiable.

free.

Total.

Domestic Foreign Foreiga Years. produce.

Specie. 1852.

$2,965,512 $325,732 $20,759 $2,971,499 $6,283,530 1851

3,188,027 284,397 2,311 6,004,170 9,478,905 1850

3,574,260 413,671 17,563 1,618,080 5,523,574 Taking the total from January 1st, (exclusive of specie,) the value of goods exported from New York show a slight advance upon the amount for the corresponding period of 1851, and a considerable excess as compared with the same period of 1850.

1852 ...

EXPORTS FROM NEW YORK TO FOREIGN PORTS FOR SEVEN YONTHS ENDING JULY 31.

Domestic Foreign Foreign
Years.
produce. dutiable.

free.
Specie.

Total. $25,111.363 $2,745,307 $541,978 $15.595,508 $43,994,156 1861

25,644,866 2,266,139 373,656 25.097,685 53,382,346 1850

22,491,133 2,411,578 444,533 3,971,812 29,319,056 It will be seen from this that the falling off from last year in shipments of

amount to about nine-and-a-half millions of dollars, and this notwithstanding undiminished receipts from California. We annex a comparative summary of the total exports of merchandise, recapitulated from the above table :

EXPORTS FROM NEW YORK FOR SEVEN MONTHS.

Pearls.

Whale......

...bbls.

Oats.

Years.

Specie. Merchandise. Total. 1852..

$15,595,508 $28,398,648 $43,994,156 1851

25,097,685 28,284,661 53,382,346 1850....

3,971,812 15,347,244 29,319,056 We continue our monthly table of the comparative exports to foreign ports of some of the leading articles of domestic produce, showing the total from January 1st to August 20th, inclusive :1851. 1852.

1851. 1852. Ashes-Pots....bbls. 13,968 11,450 Naval Stores....bbls. 232,768 282,500

1,333 481 OilsBeeswax.. ...lbs 195,905 159,181

galls. 831,367 30,912 Breadstuff's

Sperm.

277,005 448,896 Wheat flour ..bbls. 782,819 856,588 Lard

187,519 21,975 Rye flour 6,079 7,883 Linseed.

4,718 9,731 Corn meal.

30,197 33,076 ProvisionsWheat. ......busb. 606,703 1,072,762 Pork

30,885 25,697 Rye... 236,460 Beef.

22,596 34,866 2,658 8,053 Cut meats., ..lbs. 2,721,722 1,190,302 Barley

367 Butter

1,682,411 419,754 Corn... 1,346,978 700,800

Cheese

2,755,493 551,456 Candles-Mould, bxs. 26,601 40,370 Lard

3,970,807 2,518,131 Sperm .. 1,601 2,669 Rice...

tcs. 19,976 22,378 Coal.

tons 3,517 26,431 | Tallow... . lbs. 1,504,961 271,570 Cotton. .bales 227,065 273,051 Tobacco-Crude.pkgs. 11,437 16,887 4,354 6,393

Man'd....lbs. 2,273,798 2,583,799 Hops..

123 482 Whalebone....... 1,126,549 577,636 There is considerable excitement in the market for breadstuffs, owing to the partial failure of the English wheat harvest, now thought to produce less than an average crop; and the prospect of damage to potatoes, which each succeeding arrival more fully confirms. The exports to supply the expected deficiency will be large for the coming month. It is well to notice the change in the description of breadstuffs shipped to English markets. During the “famine year we shipped large quantities of Indian corn, intended for consumption in Ireland; ever since, the exports of this article have been gradually declining. It will be interesting to trace the progress of this decline, which has extended to all other ports, and we therefore annex a statement of the comparative shipments of the principal breadstuffs from New York for the last five years, which we have carefully compiled exclusively for this review :

EXPORTS OF BREADSTUFFS FROM NEW YORK.
1847.

1848. 1849. 1850. 1851. Flour.....bbls.

1,678,590 821,666 819,291 1,057,728 1,264,322 Wheat... bush.

2,114,792 680,587 752,318 690,056 1,468,465 Corn..

6,193,902 4,565,601 4,237,973 2,471,871 1,605,674

Hay.

It would seem from this, that while our flour and grain have been well received, corn has been gradually given up. As an article of human consumption, it is certainly less popular than wheat, and wheaten flour. There is also another change; so mueh of our flour has reached its destination in bad order, that the grain is now evidently preferred; and the orders for wheat are disproportionately increased. We give a comparison of the shipments of these three items from the 1st of January to the 20th of August in each of the last three years :

1850.
1851.

1852. Wheat flour. .bbls. 397,626 782,819

856,588 Wheat..

.bush.

104,505 606,703 1,072,762 Corn....

2,321,402 1,346,978 700,800 Thus we see that, while the export of flour has slightly increased from last year, that of wheat has been nearly doubled, and that of corn only about half as much, up to the present date. This difference will be still more perceptible as the season progresses. The late orders have been nearly all for wheat, and the clearances will now be quite large compared with the corresponding period

of last year.

JOURNAL OF BANKING, CURRENCY, AND FINANCE.

Rate

Date.

a year.

6

DEBT AND FINANCES OF NEW ORLEANS. We are under obligations to W. H. Garland, of New Orleans, for a pamphlet, written by him, containing an expose of the financial affairs of that city, from which we gather the statements here presented :

The indebtedness of New Orleans consists of two kinds:-1. That which was contracted before the division of the city into Municipalities, called the Old City Debt. 2. That which has been incurred by the Municipalities separately, since that division, The following is a statement of the Old Debt as it stood on the sih November last :STATEMENT OF BONDS ISSUED FOR OLD CITY DEBTS AND OUTSTANDING ON NOV. 8, 1851.

When due Interest of interest. and payable.

Amount. 1830, May 1......

1850 $3,420 $57,000 1833, March 1.

5

1851 8,850 177,000 1833, February 1

5

1858 7,500 150,000 1847, January 16.

5

854

450 9,000 1835, March 20

1855
450

9,000 1830, July 1.

1855 6,000 100,000 1834, November 1

5

1855 17,500 350,000 1835, January 1.

1859 5,000 100.000 1835, January 1.

5

1860 5,000 100,000 1835, September 1

5

1860 5,000 100,000 1833, December 30...

1863 10,000 200,000 1834, August 1....

6

1864 21,540 859,000 1834, September 15

1864 2,250 45.000 1836, January 1.

1866 25,000 500,000 1833, July 20..

5

1873 18,200 364,000 1836, March 1

5

1876 2,300 46,000

per cent

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$138,460 $2,666,000 Interest coupons due and unpaid on the 8th November, 1851...... 202,065 Total of Old City Debt...

$2,868,065 At the division of the city a sinking fund was created, with large assets, for the purpose of liquidating this debt, but through bad management and the changing vicissitudes of commercial revulsions, these assets bave become almost worthless. With the exception of some $60,000 of available assets still in the hands of the liquidators, the amount that may be obtained from the sale of the Batture, and the contingent hope of realizing something from the donation by Stephen Girard of negroes and land on the Ouachita, the means of paying this debt will have to be drawn from the general resources of the city.

There may, however, be deducted from this debt a series of bonds, originally $500,000, issued to the Commercial Water Works, in exchange for an equal amount of the stock of the company. From the dividends arising from this stock, a portion of these bonds have been redeemed, and the amount remaining is $364,000, while the city still holds the $500,000 of stock in the water works. Although the market value of this stock is now only about $40 a sbare, it will undoubtedly increase in value so far as to be amply sufficient to meet the bonds for which it was exchanged. From the sale of the Batture, it is estimated, sufficient will be received to pay the interest past due. $202,065. These two sums amount together to $566,065, and reduce the debt to $2,302,000.

By an act of 8th March, 1836, the means of paying the interest on this debt were to be drawn from the several Municipalities in proportion to their respective resources, and not in proportion to their assessed wealth. The neglect of the Municipalities to respond to the requisition of the General Council for the payment of the interest of this debt, has had the effect to injure materially the credit of the city. The amount 1 of the yearly interest is $138,460, and, as will be seen by the table, the interest for about a year and a half, $202,065, was remaining unpaid at the cominencement of the present year, which, with $234,000 past due of the principal of the debt, makes the sum of $486.065 due to the holders of this stock. The neglect in question arises from no indisposition to meet the obligations which the city is so abundantly able to provide for, but is the result of the peculiar administration of her municipal affairs. The population of New Orleans is made up of classes not only differing from each other in language and manners, but confined according to these differences to particular sections, and constituting thus almost separate communities. Time and the genius of our institutions, it is admitted, are gradually wearing away these distinctions, but still they exist to a very considerable extent, with all their prejudices and influences. The prevalent feeling between the sections is a constant jealousy lest either one should acquire an undue influence, and should abuse its power by aggressions upon the others. To this sensitiveness, it has become necessary that the general principle, so much in favor as the conservator of the rights of the weak, representation based upon population, should bend—and hence the division of the city into Municipalities, supreme in certain matters within themselves, and among these, each liable only for such debt as it may itself contract. This is carrying into extended practice the principle involved in the old dogma of State Rights ; and although this may be the best system that the city in question could adopt, under existing circumstances, it could not but be the occasion of serious inconveniences. Among others, is this very neglect, injurious alike to the city and to its creditors, of meeting punctually its obligations. The Mayor draws bis warrant on the several Municipalities, and has done therein all that is required at his hands-- farther authority in the matter he has none. The present Municipal Councils, not having contracted the debt themselves, and seeing that its adjustment is to pass through the Mayor's hands, profess to know little about the matter, and thus the government of the city fails of doing what it ought, in consequence of a divided responsibility, which is, of course, everywhere, no responsibility. The want of punctuality in the Municipalities gave rise to a system of giving twelve months' drafts upon them severally for the accrued interest; which drafts were paid or not, as circumstances would dictate. Against the injustice of this, no practical remedy has been found Undoubtedly, the evil will continue, getting more and more aggravated, until some change is made in the construction of the city government. A prostration of credit, and the inconveniences therefrom, might induce a temporary promptness on the part of the Municipal Councils, in furnishing their respective contributions, but the evil would be sure to recur when the spur was no longer felt, and must at last permanently affect the reputation of the city. Such a change, at least, sbould be effected as will establish sufficient centralism to prevent all considerations of the general interest from being swallowed up in the intense selfishness of a morbid sectionalism.

The other debt, attaching to the several Municipalities, and contracted since the division of the city, was, at the commencement of the present year, as follows:

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